Cougar encounter (near Lumby, BC)

Safety Alert Type: 
Wildlife encounter
Location: 
Camel’s Hump, Clier Lake Road
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-11-20
Company Name: 
Cabin Forestry Services
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

While a worker was engineering a road location, a small cougar appeared 6 metres above on top of a rocky slope.

Worker shouted at cougar and pulled bear spray out, but the cougar held its position. Worker shouted and chased after it until cougar retreated 15 metres without taking his eyes off of worker.

Coworker was then notified of incident as worker began walking back to the truck less than a kilometre away. When worker safely got back to the truck, the cougar appeared on the road in front of the truck.

The cougar had circled around to appear where the worker may have been had he continued to walk down the road.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Always carry bear spray
  • Watch for tracks in the snow
  • Do not run. Flight might trigger pursuit
  • Face the cougar - don’t turn your back. Stand up
  • Maintain eye contact with the cougar
  • If you are working with a partner or crew use your radio to notify them that you have encountered a cougar. Let others within radio contact know your situation and location
  • Be aware of surroundings, especially what is up slope of your position.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kevin Chau – Cabin Forestry Services, Vernon, B.C. Phone: (778) 475-3655 Email: kchau@cabinforestry.com

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Cabin_Forestry_2015-11-20-cougar-encounter.pdf

Log truck driver not in the clear while loading

Safety Alert Type: 
Yarding and Loading
Location: 
Interior Operations, Adams Lake Division
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-11-16
Company Name: 
Interfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Hazard: Truck drivers are at risk of being struck by a log if they are not in-the-clear while being loaded.

Summary: A log loader was loading a truck with cut-to-length logs when a log slipped from the grapple and slid over bullboard and in front of truck (shown in picture). As per safe work procedures, the driver was in the clear and there was no issue.

On a separate site, on the same day, a different truck driver was observed standing near his bullboard watching his air gauge while being loaded. He was NOT in the clear. Luckily, a log from this loaderman’s grapple did not slip out and strike him.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Actions to Prevent a Re-Occurrence:

  • Prior to loading, loader operators must confirm that the driver is in–the clear at ALL times
  • While being loaded, drivers must stay out of the “circle of danger” to prevent being struck by a log.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Erik Kok, RPF, Interfor, Interior Operations, Erik.Kok@Interfor.com (250) 679-6842

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-DriverNotInTheClear_2015-11-16.pdf

Tripping hazard in low light: barbed wire fencing

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
Blue Springs (southern interior region)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-11-17
Company Name: 
Cabin Forestry Services
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

It was getting dark early on a northern aspect. Worker could no longer read the slopes from clinometer and decided it was time to head back to the truck.

Worker was walking at a brisk pace along a brushed in trail and failed to see an old fence. Two rusted brown barbed wires hanging at shin height took out both feet, and sent the worker tumbling forward. In the dim lighting the fence was camoflaged by brown leaves on the ground, as well as being hidden in the cedar regen.

Fortunately no cuts or puncture wounds were sustained, perhaps in part prevented by raingear. Only injuries sustained were bruise lines across the shins.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Watch out for old fence structures where private lands or range tenures exist - or may have existed
  • When walking down a trail for the first time, slow down and assess the hazards
  • Don't be in a rush getting back to the truck at the end of the day.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kevin Chau – Cabin Forestry Services, Vernon, B.C. Phone: (778) 475-3655 Email: kchau@cabinforestry.com

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Cabin_Forestry-fence_2015-11-17.pdf

Fatigue during chainsaw use leads to close call

Safety Alert Type: 
Bucking and Limbing
Location: 
Tulip Creek, west Kootenays
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-11-05
Company Name: 
Cabin Forestry Services
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A worker became extremely tired with prolonged chainsaw use. After delimbing a branch, worker let his arms down while the chain was still turning and coming to idle.

A section of chain near the base of the bar hit the chainsaw chaps on his upper thigh and produced an 11 cm rip into the protective material within (see picture in attached pdf).

Worker did not sustain any injuries from the incident.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Recommended Preventative Actions

  • Always wear PPE
  • Be aware of the dangers of fatigue and meeting production expectations
  • Maintain proper nutrition, hydration and adequate sleep
  • Recognize and acknowledge inadequate physical abilities when operating saws
  • Take rest breaks when needed
  • Promote good posture and chainsaw techniques
  • Review chainsaw training prior to operation for new or returning operators

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kevin Chau – Cabin Forestry Services, Vernon, B.C. Phone: (778) 475-3655 Email: kchau@cabinforestry.com

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Cabin_Forestry-chainsaw-chaps_2015-11-5.pdf

HAZARD ALERT : High pressure injection injury results in amputation of worker's finger

Safety Alert Type: 
Mechanical Service (Field)
Location: 
Vancouver Island
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-11-03
Company Name: 
Helifor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A worker was working on a pressurized hydraulic line that had a pinhole leak. The worker inadvertently passed his hand over the leak while attempting to place a cloth over it to contain the escaping fluid.

Unknowingly the worker received a 1 centimetre cut on his right index finger caused by the high pressure from the escaping hydraulic fluid.

Due to the high pressure injection injury, infection spread rapidly resulting in the amputation of the worker’s right index finger (Warning: attached pdf contains graphic image).

Learnings and Suggestions: 

The Causes: Equipment such as paint or grease guns, diesel engine fuel injectors, hydraulic lines and pressure washers are all capable of emitting enough pressure to breach the human skin and inject contents into the human body which can cause workplace high pressure injection injuries.

Only 100 pounds per square inch (psi) is required to break intact human skin.

First Aid: Workers with injection injuries may experience little or no pain at the time of the incident. Entry wounds are frequently small or appear insignificant.

Any injury suspected to be from high pressure injection “Must be treated as Surgical Emergencies and RTC to appropriate facility”.

All details, including injection substances (SDS’s or non-hazardous materials ie: air, water) and observations must be recorded and accompany the injured worker.

Emergency Response Plans must include the name and contact information for qualified surgeons located at a minimum of 2 local hospitals. They must be notified that a worker has (or is suspected to have) a high pressure injection injury and is being medically evacuated to their location for immediate surgery.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Bill Clarke, Safety & Asset Manager - Helifor Office (604) 269-2002 bill.clarke@helifor.com

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Helifor_11-3-2015.pdf

MANUFACTURING: Planer head moves despite being locked out, worker suffers finger amputation

Safety Alert Type: 
Manufacturing
Location: 
Northern Interior Planer Mill
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-09-30
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

In an effort to control combustible dust, a manufacturing facility in the northern interior region increased the ventilation rate on their planer.

The planer was locked out, but due to the increased flow rate of the ventilation system, there was still an uncontrolled energy source present.

The increased air flow caused the opposite head on the planer to rotate. This situation contributed to a finger amputation at this particular manufacturing plant.

The employer did not do a re-evaluation of the planer for hazards after the modifications to the ventilation system were made.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Consider this potential risk and re-evaluate planer lockout programs if the facility has increased the air flow through the ventilation systems.

Video link that shows a planer head rotating despite being locked out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQRiVgupLn4

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Gary Banys, BC Forest Safety Council 1-877-741-1060

File attachments
Safety_Alert_BCFSC_Planer_Head_Movement_2015-9-30.pdf

HAZARD ALERT : Cab Tilt System Failure

Safety Alert Type: 
Mechanical Service (Field)
Location: 
Coastal British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-09-26
Company Name: 
Nootka Sound Timber Co. Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Mechanics were sent out to check the cab tilt system on a Madill 3800c. They found wiring needing repair for the system to function. After the repair was made, the cab was cleared of equipment & debris and anchor bolts were removed.

The cab tilt function was engaged and the cab began to rise as it should. When the cab reached an elevated level of approximately 6” it fell forward extremely fast. The mechanics immediately tried to reverse the cab by pushing the button in the opposite direction but it continued forward until it struck the track and the ground. In the process, the anchor strap came tight and broke under the strain.

At that point the house cylinder was over-extended and the rod was pulled from the cylinder (see photos in attached pdf), breaking at the piston retainer nut. Both mechanics were in the clear and were not injured in the incident. The investigation determined that there was no oil in the hydraulic cab tilt cylinder. Having no fluid to restrict the piston in the cylinder, there was no way the weight of the cab would be supported. It was also determined that the house /cab hydraulic power pack had been replaced at some point so the likelihood of air in the system was high.

This particular cab had not been tilted in a long time, factors which were not considered before lowering the cab.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • If a particular machine has not had a cab tilt function performed in considerable time, the cylinder rod should be unpinned and completely cycled to purge the system, and ensure the system is operating correctly before performing the actual cab tilt function.
  • Any time repairs have been made to the house / cab hydraulic power pack, the system must be purged to ensure all air is removed from the system and that fluid levels are adequate.
  • Amend relevant Job Safety Breakdown procedures to reflect the above findings.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Virginia Mountan (250) 830-2292

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Nootka_Sound_Timber_2015-9-26.pdf

Advisory: LED lamps can interfere with a vehicle’s radio transmissions

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-09-30
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

There have been numerous complaints about LED light bulbs interfering with vehicle radio transmissions.

The level of interference varies depending on the installation of the LED lights. The closer the radio antenna is to the lights, the greater the level of interference. Some brands of LED lights are worse than others.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Place the antenna further away from the LED lights (i.e.: install on roof)
  • Install a filter on the lead electrical wires (lines) going to the lights (filter weakens the power emissions of the lights, minimizing the radio interference). The filter is available at your local radio communications shop or auto parts stores (approximate cost of $20/filter)
  • Use a different brand of LED lights

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Contact your local radio communications sales & service provider.

File attachments
Safety_Alert_LED lights-radio interference-Sept-30-2015.pdf

ATV impact with water bar throws driver from machine

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
Side road off the Tulameen Forest Service Road (Cascades Forest District)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-09-08
Company Name: 
Cascadia Environmental Services Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

While driving an All-Terrain Vehicle on a temporarily deactivated road, the operator of the ATV was launched over the handle bars after failing to see a *water bar soon enough to slow down and safely ride through it.

The water bar was difficult to see until it was too late. The driver hit the handle bars with his left shin and right foot, and impacted the ground with the helmet and his left shoulder. Prior to the incident the ATV was travelling at approximately 20 km/h.

(*The purpose of a water bar is to capture and direct road surface water from the road into the ditch line or across the road surface beyond the shoulder of the road.)

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Corrective Actions:

  • When riding a road for the first time ride very slow to assess the hazards
  • Don’t take for granted a nice looking, straight, flat stretch of road - especially when you know there has been some level of deactivation

Learnings & Suggestions:

  • Mark the location of water bars - particularly ones that are hard to see - as they are encountered with a piece of ribbon or paint

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Cascadia Environmental Services Ltd., Abbotsford, BC (604) 287-3225

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Cascadia_waterbar_2015-9-8.pdf

Kenworth’s Nautilus navigation system interfering with Resource Road Radio Channel 13

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
Prince George area
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-08-31
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A contractor in Prince George operates a fleet of 5 Kenworth heavy trucks, all equipped with Kenworth’s Nautilus navigation system. Drivers of these particular trucks have reported that when their radio is on Resource Road channel 13, all they hear over the radio is squelch noise.

The radios transmit fine – others can hear the transmissions unless they’re also driving a Kenworth that features the Nautilus navigation system. The contractor is currently using the TAD M10 radio and has also tested with an ICOM and found the same problem. The contractor reports that all other resource road radio channels are working and appear unaffected.

The contractor went to the shop where the radios were purchased. The shop identified that the Nautilus navigation system creates a harmonic frequency that can cause interference with radio use. The problem does not occur when the navigation system is turned-off.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • The contractor has installed an On/Off switch in his fleet of Kenworth trucks that allows the navigation system to be shut off while operating on resource roads which stops the interference from the system and allows the mobile radio to function properly.
  • Kenworth, the navigation system manufacturer, Industry Canada and Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations have been advised of this issue.
  • Results of investigations shall be provided as they are available.

Item to Note: MFLNRO should be informed of interference issues that are not isolated to particular, single vehicles but appear to be widespread, so that they can be addressed and necessary fixes can be communicated out to users.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Transportation and Northern Safety, BC Forest Safety Council – Prince George (toll free 877-741-1060) or Transport@bcforestsafe.org

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Kenworth_Nav_System_2015-8-31.pdf
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