Login

Trailer reach breaks, loaded log truck crashes on Forest Service Road

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-08-25
Company Name: 
CANFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A loaded logging truck (tandem axle jeep configuration) was travelling down a forest service road when the driver noticed the trailer tracking off the road. The trailer reach came apart, causing the trailer to go into the ditch on the other side of the road while pulling the tractor in with it and consequently spilling the load of logs.

The driver had previously noticed a small piece of the stopper on the reach was broken, which caused the trailer to inadvertently unhitch before, but was ignored because the damage was thought to be insignificant.

As a result of the incident the driver sustained luckily only minor injuries but the damages were estimated to exceed $15,000.

Potential Hazards

  • A very serious incident can result whenever a trailer comes unexpectedly unhitched from the tractor towing it, especially one fully loaded with logs.
  • Loose objects can cause personal injury to the occupants during a flop over/rollover. A coffee thermos in the cab of tractor struck driver in the head during incident resulting in minor injuries (i.e., scrapes & bruising).

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Preventative Actions

  • The contractor has clearly communicated to their subcontractors that all trucks must be 100% in a safe working condition before starting work.
  • The contractor has mandated that all of this particular subcontractor’s trucks pass a maintenance safety inspection before being hired back for work.
  • All drivers have been told to park trucks if they ever notice any potential mechanical or safety issues that they can’t address.
  • All truck cabs will be inspected and any loose objects will be removed or securely stored.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Tyson von den Steinen, Canadian Forest Products Ltd (250) 962-3229 Tyson.vondenSteinen@canfor.com 

File attachments
safety_alert_canfor_contractor_REACH_STOP_8_25_2016.pdf

Logging Trailer - Broken pole trailer reach leads to tip over

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Shuswap region
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-12-12
Company Name: 
INTERFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Upon exiting the FSR, while having to negotiate a road obstruction, this unit had to make a sharp left-turn. Turning the cab into the West-bound lane, the driver felt something was not right – “like something was dragging”. Immediately after the unit completely rolled over.

Investigation revealed that the reach broke within the trailer body housing. This action caused the bunk slipper to drop below the bolster plate, thus not allowing the trailer to track in its proper path, causing the trailer and truck to roll over.

Fracture lines within the reach showed the fresh break on the drivers-side of the reach, however it also showed three other fracture lines that were of an old nature.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Driver unable to detect a defect during trip inspections because, the previous cracks were well within the trailer body housing and out of sight.
  • Legislated Government Commercial Vehicle Inspections performed by a certified inspector, require that during the inspection process the reach must be inspected for its entire length. The reach must be fully extended for the inspection. Owners need to confirm that this procedure is followed.
  • It is recommended that operators of these types of units slide their reaches on a periodic basis to free up any debris or rust that may cause issues where the reach and trailer housing may seize.
  • Owners of these types of units, should check with the manufactures of their reaches to find the expected life-span of their specific reach.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Erik Kok, Interfor Adams Lake Division. erik.kok@interfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-Logging_Trailer-Broken_Pole_Trailer_Reach-Dec_12_2016.pdf

Changing a flat tire is easier with a wire brush and some wood

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-07-30
Company Name: 
CANFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 
  1. After the sidewall blew out an employee had to change a tire but was unable to get one of the lug nuts off because the tire iron was inadequate.
  2. An employee was changing a flat tire in the field but had a difficult time placing the jack on a flat supportive surface due to the road condition at that particular location.
  3. An employee was changing a flat tire but had difficulty replacing it because the posts and hub were so dirty.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

 Potential Hazards

  • If tires are installed with incorrect torque they can be difficult to remove manually.
  • Not having the correct tools can lead to the inability to change the tire and ultimately the potential to be stranded in the field.
  • The jack could slip from not being properly placed on a stable surface, which could result in serious injury.
  • If lugs, posts, and hubs are dirty or rusted then a proper replacement will be difficult and the wheel might not be secure.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Tyson von den Steinen, Canadian Forest Products Ltd (250) 962-3229 Tyson.vondenSteinen@canfor.com 

File attachments
safety_alert_canfor_FLAT_TIRE_PREPAREDNESS_07_30_2016.pdf

NEAR MISS: Log Truck and School Bus Safety

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
Nazko Highway (Cariboo Region)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-12-01
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

There have been several incidents reported by school bus drivers where log trucks have passed school buses with lights flashing and stop signs out.

These incidents have fortunately been near misses to date, as the school bus drivers were able to keep the children in the bus when these incidents occurred.

We are all cognizant that a near miss is an opportunity to identify causes and prevent a more serious incident from occurring.

Remember! It is illegal to pass a school bus when its lights are flashing and the stop sign is out.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

 

  • Plan ahead: Be aware and take note of the bus stops along your route. Observe the time of day when school buses are operating (7:00am-9:00am and 3:00pm-5:00pm)
  • Be prepared to accommodate (buses or other traffic)
  • Drive according to conditions
  • Under no circumstances is it ever ok to pass a school bus when its lights are flashing and stop sign is out.

 

File attachments
SchoolBus-LogTruck-NearMisses-Dec_2016.pdf

Winter Operations: Poor conditions, late start emphasize importance of driver diligence

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-11-25
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Current State: Conditions provincially have been very challenging this fall due to wet and warm weather conditions. This has resulted in lower than normal operational activity which has increased the amount of wood in the bush and reduced the amount of wood making it to the mills.

It has also led to night shifts in many areas of the province which is unusual for this time of year.

Currently weather conditions are improving and operational activities are returning to normal levels. Night shifts in many areas have and are transitioning to normal operating hours.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

The hazards:

  • Stress caused by increased pressure for deliveries
  • Fatigue as staff transition from night to day shift
  • Road and environmental change to winter conditions
  •  

Considerations:

  • Speed - driving too fast for conditions - remains the number one contributor to fatal motor vehicle crashes in BC. Each fall, the number of people killed or injured in a crash as a result of driving too fast for conditions spikes upwards - nearly doubling
  • What is a safe speed? It is not simply the greatest speed at which you can "keep ‘er on the road." Safe speed includes obligations to drive at a speed that does not generate undue risks, and to apply behaviours that provide a margin of error - for you and other drivers.
  • Driving decisions must accurately consider the physical environment. Drivers have to think about the road (e.g. surface materials, lane width, sighting distance, grade, etc.) and the weather. More importantly, your calculations have to account for how these factors influence visibility, traction and vehicle performance.
  • At all times, especially if you are transitioning in or out of night shift you must ensure you are at the top of your game.

Factors that support this:

  • Well-rested and alert - 6 to 9 hours of sleep is recommended.
  • Patience - Use patience with other drivers, road maintenance crews, etc.
  • Proper hydration and diet - Heathy eating is part of overall wellness.
  • Physical / mental fitness - Helps ensure you are best prepared for the job.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Dustin Meierhofer, BC Forest Safety Council 1-877-741-1060

File attachments
Safety_Alert_BCFSC-WinterOperations-November_2016.pdf

EXTREME SLIDE POTENTIAL FOR COASTAL REGIONS

Safety Alert Type: 
Weather
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-11-15
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

This fall has seen an unusually high amount of rainfall in most coastal regions of BC.

As a result, ground conditions are saturated to maximum levels.

With little relief between rainfall systems moving through the coastal region, please remember to continue to ensure that ground and weather conditions are included in all daily hazard assessments – especially in areas pre-identified as High Hazard.

Many falling and logging crews have already missed multiple days due to rain fall limits exceeding safe levels.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Please continue to exercise appropriate caution and base decisions on you and your crews’ safety.

While we all know there is a cost to lost production days, no cost is worth your or anyone else’s life.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

BC Forest Safety Council 1-877-741-1060

File attachments
Hazard_Alert_Extreme_Slide_Potential_Coastal_Region-BCFSC-Nov-2016.pdf

Resource Road Radio Channels Bulletin

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-10-26
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

(in conjunction with the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada)

Revised resource road radio channel standard protocols have been introduced to BC in the last few years. The objectives have been to standardize and simplify a provincially consistent approach to radio communications in order to improve safety of travel on resource roads.

Most of the province has initiated and implemented new resource road radio communication protocols which consist of simplified and consistent procedures, standardized signage, standardized radio call protocols (including use of “up/down”), and establishing a standard bank of resource road radio (RR) channels.

The introduction of standardized resource road radio protocols has been a collaborative effort including: the FLNRO, ISED (formerly Industry Canada), FPInnovations, WorkSafeBC, BCFSC, forest and resource industry sectors, and other stakeholders.

The standard bank of RR channels has been assigned to FLNRO by ISED, to be managed and administered in conjunction with ISED. FLNRO will be responsible for operational administration, tracking and application of channel assignments in the field.

  • The standard bank of RR channels consists of 35 road channels and 5 loading channels. The road channels are for communicating location and direction when travelling on resource roads. The 5 loading (LD) channels are for communicating on landings and staging areas to avoid congestion of RR channels. In addition to the RR channels, there are the 4 LAD channels which can also be used for communications. Any of the RR channels may be used for emergency communications such as in the case of incidents. Idle chit-chat is to be avoided when using any mobile radio channel or frequency which is intended for safety communications.
  • It is important to note that there are only a relative few roads that are “radio-controlled” where use of a mobile radio is mandatory to communicate location and direction when travelling on a resource road. Most resource roads in the province are “radio-assisted” and there is no requirement to have and use a mobile radio. Additionally, resource roads on Crown Land, with some exceptions, are open to use by the general public that typically do not have mobile radios.
  • Those travelling on radio-assisted resource roads should not rely solely on mobile radio communications, and must drive safely according to road and weather conditions.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Things to bring to your attention: Use the Resource Road radio channels or radio frequencies that are posted in the field. Do not solely rely on channel maps. What is posted in the field will govern over any map. Those using mobile radios for communicating on resource roads must call according to posted channels/frequencies and protocols.

  • Not all resource roads around the province have been converted to the standard set of RR channels; some industrial users are still using pre-existing frequencies; for some roads, RR channels are being adopted as they become industrially active.
  • The RR channels are available to all mobile radio users, and can be obtained through commercial radio shops, provided they have a radio license with the RR Appendix. Radio licenses are issued by ISED.
  • RR channel maps have been developed as planning tools. However, these should not be solely relied upon to determine the appropriate channels in the field; what is on a map may not be posted in the field; mobile radio users should be relying on what is posted on the roads they are traveling on. Link to RR channel planning maps: https://www.for.gov.bc.ca/hth/engineering/Road_Radio_Project.htm 
  • Programming of select channels into mobile radios (“cherry picking”) of channels is discouraged; all users are encouraged to have the full standard RR channel bank programmed into their radios by commercial radio shops.
  • All resource road users in the affected areas should exercise additional caution during the transition period to new resource road radio communication protocols.
  • A procedure has been developed for permanent and temporary changes to RR channel assignments. All changes require approval by the MFLNRO District Engineering Officer as well as ISED. This is a link to the Channel Change Procedure.
  • RR channel 13 has been removed from service due to conflict with an electronic system in certain Kenworth trucks. RR 13 should not be assigned or used until further notice; if assigned, please move to change the channel following the channel change procedure.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Do the new resource road radio (RR) channels affect private radio channels ownership and use?

A: The new RR channels do not impact private channel ownership & use. However, radio channel or frequency use must reflect that posted on the road being used or area being accessed.

Are there channels available for use in addition to the RR channels?

A: Yes, LAD channels can be used as an addition to existing RR loading channels when radio congestion is an issue.

Is the use of old channel/frequencies (i.e. legacy channels/frequencies Appendix 6) allowed?

A: Yes, the use of existing/legacy road radio channels/frequencies should be used where signage indicates. As the transition of the roads within the province to the RR channels will take significant effort & time, the ongoing use of traditional channels/frequencies is anticipated to decrease.

Can an RR channel assigned to a road be changed?

A: Yes. There is a procedure in place which details the required process to change/assign a temporary RR channel. Link: Channel Change Procedure

Additional information and maps on the initiative can be found at: https://www.for.gov.bc.ca/hth/engineering/Road_Radio_Project.htm

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

MFLNRO District Engineer within your area via Service BC 1-800-663-7867 or the BC Forest Safety Council’s Transportation Safety Program 1-877-741-1060.

File attachments
Safety_Alert_RR_Radio_Channels_Bulletin-BCFSC-2016-10-26.pdf

Chain shot incident injures operator

Safety Alert Type: 
Heavy Equipment
Location: 
near Fort St. James, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-10-16
Company Name: 
KDL Group (K & D Logging)
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Injuries and fatalities have been occurring in the forest industry due to processor ‘Chain shot’. Chain shot is when a processor chain breaks and the broken link is whipped or shot (sometimes in excess of 8,000 feet per second) from the processor head. This link travels at such a high rate of speed that it can severely injure or kill a worker if struck.

Recently, K&D Logging experienced a ‘chain shot’ which pierced through a 12mm Lexan window (see photos in attached pdf) and lodged in an operator’s leg, just below the knee. The operator required surgery to remove the 2 links from his leg.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Actions:

  • Ground crews should never work within a 300ft radius of an operating processor. If an individual is checking log quality (other than the operator), shut the processor off and join the individual with the quality check. Do not run the machine while anyone is within the 300ft limit.
  • Never operate the main saw in front of the cab. Always tilt the head so the bar is angled away from the cab. Positioning the head a few degrees can mean all of the difference in avoiding a direct chain shot.
  • Discuss with your supervisor if you are processing safely to avoid chain shot. Have someone else watch the way you process to ensure that you are being safe and that you are positioned correctly.

Currently, K&D Logging has a chain re-sharpening program. The current program disposes of chains when: there is a broken link, damage to 2 or more teeth, excessive wear or more than 3 sharpenings. There will be more information on this topic as we learn from our chain supplier (Stihl) and from others who manage a chain sharpening program.

WorkSafeBC is working with manufacturers and dealers to develop engineered controls (barriers or guarding) to limit the risk of chain shot. Until these controls are finalized, operators need to ensure proper head positioning while cutting and avoid using chains with excessive wear.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

KDL GROUP

www.kdlgroup.net

 

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_KDL_Group_2016-10-16.pdf

Large stick grabbed by skidder’s tire chains, startles operator by entering cab

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
McLeod Block (near Fort St. James)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-10-05
Company Name: 
DNT Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

While skidding on a block, a stick got caught (2-3" in diameter and several feet long) in the tire chains on the skidder.

The stick was small enough that it passed through the protective grating on the side window on the door of the skidder. The inside window on the skidder door was slid open.

The stick entered the cab about 12" startling the operator.

Root Cause: 

  • Maintenance
  • Chains Loose on Skidder
  • Eyes not on task
  • Inadequate assessment of hazard and risks.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Proper maintenance
  • Keep skidder chains tightened on skidder to help prevent sticks from getting caught in them
  • Mind on task, and review hazards and risks for the job.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Clint Ludwig (250) 567-5167

File attachments
Safety_Alert_DNT_Contracting_2016-5-10.pdf

Good Samaritan Stabbed at Crash Scene

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
Inland Island Hwy – North of Hwy #4 / Port Alberni Turnoff
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-09-21
Company Name: 
Mount Sicker Lumber Company
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A worker was heading to Port Alberni, for work, in the early morning. While en route he witnessed a motor vehicle veer across both northbound lanes, grass meridian and southbound lanes, ending up in the bushes, north of the Hwy #4 junction.

The worker called his Supervisor to advise him he was going to stop and instructed him to contact 911 to send out the police and ambulance.

The worker helped the vehicle driver out of the ditch and up to the road side. The vehicle driver then turned on the worker, stabbed him in the chest and stole the worker’s vehicle.

The worker was able to call his Supervisor back to report the stabbing and vehicle theft. An ambulance was already on its way to the incident and the worker was taken to hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

During a regular workday, forestry employees and supervisors are well versed in ERP for serious injury within their work environment.

The employees have not received ERP training for non-work related, non-industrial incidents or motor vehicle accidents that include upset conditions and unknown citizens.

  • Do not put yourself into an unsafe situation when you are not trained in the upset condition
  • If possible, wait until someone can render assistance
  • If leaving your vehicle ensure you contact someone to advise them first of the incident and location, along with a check back time. Follow working alone Man Check procedures.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Mount Sicker Lumber Company kent@mountsicker.com 

« first‹ previous5678910111213next ›last »
Careers | Contact Us | Top | Privacy Statement | Terms and Conditions |
Copyright © 2006-2018 BC Forest Safety Council. All rights reserved.
|