Driver Fatigue: A serious hazard!

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-08-18
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Driver fatigue played a role in two separate incidents involving an empty logging truck and a loaded logging truck.

Both were single vehicle accidents which fortunately resulted in only minor injuries. In addition, there was approximately $55,000 in damage caused.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Fatigue can be as much of a hazard as someone who is impaired by other means.

Employees should ensure they have adequate rest and hydration and are encouraged to self-report and assess their ability to perform their assigned duties.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Ron Neufeld (250) 845-8960

New weigh scale safety procedures aim to protect workers

Safety Alert Type: 
Worksites
Location: 
Grand Forks, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-07-20
Company Name: 
Interfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A log truck driver left the scales without following correct procedures, putting a Weighmaster at risk. Drivers must not get in their cabs when a worker is on the scales.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

A cone will be placed outside of driver’s door upon arrival (see photo in attached pdf). Driver may not move the cone or leave the scales until the Weighmaster/Scaler determines the area is clear and removes the cone.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

J. Walker Scaling Ltd. (250-574-0802) or Ron Last (778-206-4082)

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-Scale_Procedures_2016-7-20.pdf

Hazard Alert: Worker caught, seriously injured in unguarded auger

Safety Alert Type: 
Booming and Towing
Location: 
Coastal British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2014-07-03
Company Name: 
Issued by WorkSafeBC
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A worker was operating an unguarded, gas-powered auger mounted to a floating deck tied to a barge. The auger was being used to drill holes in boomsticks.

While positioning a boomstick under the auger — which was still running — the worker was exposed to the rotating auger shaft. The worker’s clothing got caught in the counterbore portion of the auger drill bit, and he became entangled in the bit. The worker sustained serious injuries.

Several factors played a role in this incident:

  • Failure to inspect or safely maintain equipment — Purchased secondhand, the auger was made operational using unmatched engine parts. As a result, the unguarded auger and transmission parts were always moving or turning while the engine was running.
  • Lack of safeguarding — Workers had direct access to the rotating drill bit because no guards or barriers prevented auger contact.
  • Lack of safe work procedures — Safe work procedures were not on site and did not address lockout.
  • Lack of supervision and training — The worker received a site orientation but no formal training or written instructions for auger use or lockout.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

 

Safe work practices:

  • Conduct risk assessments of boom augers and follow the manufacturer’s instructions on using augers safely.
  • Conduct inspections of equipment before use.
  • Ensure augers are guarded — and belts safeguarded — as required.
  • Train supervisors on auger guarding requirements.
  • Review safe work procedures with supervisors and workers before using equipment.
  • Ensure workers are fully trained before operating any equipment, even seemingly straightforward equipment.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For assistance and information on workplace health and safety, call toll-free within B.C. 1.888.621.SAFE (7233) or visit their website at worksafebc.com.

To request a copy of the complete investigation report, contact the WorkSafeBC Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy office toll-free at 1.866.266.9405.

File attachments
HazardAlert-BoomstickAuger-WorkSafeBC-June_30-2016.pdf

Log pushed into cab emphasizes the importance of completing a tug test

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Mesachie Lake (south Vancouver Island)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-04-20
Company Name: 
Mount Sicker Lumber Co. Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

After being loaded, a logging truck proceeded downhill. When stopping at an intersection the jeep came ahead, pushing a log through the bulk head /head ache rack and into the cab, narrowly missing the driver.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • The driver did not perform a tug test once loaded, before proceeding downhill
  • Best practise: Perform a tug test every time, before leaving the landing to ensure the jeep dogs are in and set.

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Mount_Sicker_Lumber_2016-4-20.pdf

Inspection of log truck reveals broken frame

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Campbell River Forest District
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-05-25
Company Name: 
Fearless Log Salvage Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The driver of a self-loading log truck reported to the shop that he noticed his truck was handling differently.

After a quick inspection, he suspected that one front spring had a broken leaf.

When the mechanics arrived to carry out repairs, they found the frame was broken behind the loader mount.

The truck was taken out of service.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Regular thorough inspections of the truck are essential and are not limited to pre/post trip inspections.

Should you notice a difference in the driving/operational performance of your truck, it is imperative that the cause be accurately diagnosed to ensure continued safe operation.

The increased frequency of these inspections is even more critical when hauling on rough roads or carrying heavier weights.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Fearless Log Salvage Ltd. (250) 286-6630

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Fearless_Log_Salvage-2016-5-25.pdf

Log truck driver loses trailer brakes on 23% grade, crashes truck into ditch

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
TFL 39 (Vancouver Island)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-05-12
Company Name: 
Kurt Leroy Trucking Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A loaded logging truck was travelling down an 18-24% grade section of the spur road in first gear when the driver felt the load pushing.

As the driver engaged the brakes and pulled on the hand valve, the truck “hopped” and it was apparent the trailer brakes were not engaged.

With no relief for nearly 400 metres further down the road, the driver feared losing control of the truck due to an upcoming switchback. He removed his seatbelt and initially planned to jump from the truck but instead decided to put the rig into the ditch. The driver estimates he was travelling at a speed of 15 – 20 km/h.

Investigation confirmed the brakes on the tractor (lining, drums, etc) were all within acceptable limits and found to be in good working order. However, it was discovered that a compression fitting used to splice the service air line to the trailer’s air tanks had failed and leaked air. The fitting’s furls had not been crimped properly to the air line and the brass fitting not tightened properly to hold the splice in place.

While the driver did conduct a pre-trip inspection and a cursory check to see the air line was repaired, he did not examine the fitting closely.

The driver stated he did not have any issues while being loaded (as he would have engaged his maxi’s). The landing bucker stated he did not hear any air leaks however the noise from the loader’s engine would have hampered the ability to hear any leaks. Prior to departing for the log sort, the driver did a tug test with the hand valve and determined all to be okay.

As a result of the incident, the log truck driver suffered some small cuts and bruises but more seriously, had also fractured a vertebra in his neck.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • The driver acknowledged not following safe job procedures (SJP) regarding seatbelt use, and failed to conduct a thorough check of the air line splice repair
  • The subcontractor acknowledged the repair had not been inspected by a supervisor
  • Prior to leaving the landing with a load of logs, drivers must ensure they complete a tug test and confirm all air systems are functioning normally
  • Steep grade assessments must be completed prior to hauling on grades great than 18%
  • Log truck drivers should always wear seat belts while driving to prevent injuries in the event of an accident
  • All repairs to braking systems should be thoroughly checked and tested for air leaks.

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Kurt_Leroy_Trucking_2016-5-12.pdf

Staying hydrated: Not just a summertime concern

Safety Alert Type: 
Weather
Location: 
Grand Forks area
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-06-01
Company Name: 
Interfor (Interior Operations)
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Layout worker had been out all day in the heat and ran out of water before the end of the work day, resulting in dehydration and heat exhaustion.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Minor dehydration symptoms include thirst and dry mouth, decrease in urine, dry skin, headache, constipation and dizziness
  • Major signs include sunken eyes, low blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, delirium or unconsciousness
  • Always carry more water than you think you will need. Keep reserves in your vehicle
  • Set up a buddy system to enable workers to look out for signs and symptoms of heat-related illness in each other
  • Use wide brimmed hard hats
  • Find shade when possible.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Lana Kurz, RFP, Woodlands Safety, Interior Operations, lana.kurz@interfor.com                  (250) 679-6838

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor_Dehydration-June_1_2016.pdf

Roadside gunfire an emerging threat to forestry workers, recreation seekers

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
Resource roads throughout the province of British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-05-24
Company Name: 
Western Silvicultural Contractors' Association
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Reckless target shooting is a growing threat to forestry workers around the Province. The fear is it’s only a matter of time before a worker gets caught in the crossfire.

In the Fraser Valley specifically, contractors report it is such a hazard that foresters have cancelled silviculture projects for fear workers will get shot by indiscriminate roadside shooters.

Planters have learned it’s best to stay home on the weekends when gun owners arrive in greater numbers on forest service roads and cut-blocks and begin firing.

Besides shooting trees and signs, irresponsible gun owners often bring old household appliances and furniture to set up as targets.

They leave the roadside covered in spent shells on dozens of sites throughout the working forests in the area.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

The BC SAFE Silviculture Program (www.wsca.ca) has committed to sorting out the authorities involved and in the hope of proposing measures to keep workers safe.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

The Western Silvicultural Contractors’ Association: www.wsca.ca  

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Roadside Gunfire_2016-May 24.pdf

Rushing to complete task results in ATV incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
Kirton Creek, Summerland, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-05-17
Company Name: 
Gorman Bros. Lumber Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Worker was completing quality checks on tree planters on a large cut block, using an All-Terrain Vehicle to get around. While heading back to the pickup, worker was observing the block above the road and hit a water bar unexpectedly, causing the worker to be thrown from the quad.

Worker was aware of water bars on the road, but misjudged the distance between them and was not looking ahead. Worker was also rushing to get back to their pickup, in order to load up and move to a different cut block to continue quality checks.

First aid was provided in the field, and worker proceeded to the local ER where they received stitches.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Rushing results in carelessness and carelessness leads to accidents
  • Always keep eyes on the road/direction of travel when operating an ATV
  • Approach water bars with caution
  • Ensure proper PPE is used when operating mobile equipment
  • Keep First Aid supplies stocked and certifications current.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Stefanie Bulmer, Gorman Bros. Lumber Ltd (250) 768-6249

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Gorman_Bros_2016-5-17.pdf

Close Call: The importance of eye protection

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
Residential property, Parksville, Vancouver Island
Company Name: 
Baseline Archaeological Services Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A worker was standing and monitoring a shallow machine excavation, which involved removing a small concrete structure.

While watching the digging, a small piece of debris flew through the air and into the worker’s eye.

The worker rinsed his eye with water and returned to work. No lost time, or first aid kit or attendant was required.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Ensure your PPE is appropriate for the task at hand. For example, plastic safety glasses opposed to a mesh face shield. This will stop all small airborne particles and dust from entering your eye
  • Only stand as close to a working machine as necessary for the task.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Baseline Safety Representative, Stephanie Allester at (250) 897-3853 or email sallester@shaw.ca 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Baseline_2016-1-21.pdf
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