Log falls on truck driver at de-wrap station

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Northern Interior Region
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-06-29
Company Name: 
CANFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A truck driver was pulling his wraps at the de-wrap station when a log came down and struck him on the head.

The weighmaster and two other drivers responded before finding the driver lying on the ground unconscious.

The driver was transported to the hospital and was held for several hours before being released. The driver is unable to drive for a few days as a result of the concussion.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Hazard:

• The driver hadn’t delivered to the log yard or used the particular de-wrap station in over a year.

• A shorter log was loaded on top of the load and not within the load, as per the log transportation procedures.

• The de-wrap station arms were resting against the trailer stake and not the load, which created room for the log to pass through and make contact with the driver (see photo).

Corrective actions to be taken:

• Log yard Supervisor will initiate more observations at the de-wrap station to ensure all safe work procedures are followed and equipment is used correctly.

• Contractor will review proper loading procedures with entire crew to ensure proper loading procedures are understood.

• Short logs must be contained within the bundle and not on top of the load.

• Drivers are responsible for the safety of the load before leaving the loader and before arriving at the scale.

• Incident will be reviewed with all drivers so they are aware of the risk associated when de-wrap arms are not resting against the load.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Tyson von den Steinen, RPF - Manager, Safety & Continuous Improvement CANFOR Tyson.vondenSteinen@canfor.com 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Canfor_2015-6-29.pdf

Mechanical Alert: Steering bracket failure on off-highway log truck

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Vancouver Island
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-04-28
Company Name: 
Western Forest Products Inc.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A 1980 model Pacific P-16 off highway log truck was backing out of a fuelling site when the driver heard a bang. The driver noticed that his steering had stopped working.

Upon investigation, it was discovered the bracket that connects the steering ram to the draglink had broken. The failed bracket was supplied by a machine shop in Campbell River, BC. A bracket of the same design had failed a few months prior to this incident. However the supplier was unknown.

The manufacturer of the part did a failure analysis and found that the way the brackets were made could cause a premature failure. The bracket is now made in a different way and reinforced to avoid the failure (see photos in attached pdf).

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • The steering brackets on all off-highway trucks with a Vickers Steering Ram on the driver’s side should be checked to see if they look like the failed bracket. The failed brackets have short gussets that do not extend past the bore for the draglink ball stud. They also have a tapered boss welded into the bottom plate for the ball stud to be anchored to.
  • These brackets with shorter gussets and welded-in ball stud bosses could have been made by different manufacturers over several years. If your truck has a steering bracket with shorter gussets it should be removed and replaced with a bracket that has been engineered to withstand the steering load of these trucks. Consult your Parts supplier for the correct bracket.
  • Brackets that have a solid 2” bottom plate that has the taper for the ball stud machined into it and has gussets that extend past the ball stud bore are proven in this application.
  • Any time a draglink steering bracket is removed it should be cleaned and inspected for cracks.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Western Forest Products Inc. - Bob Glisinski (250) 283-2840

File attachments
Safety_Alert_WFP-Steering Bracket-2015-4-28.pdf

Attempt to remove key ring on water pump intake leads to sliced finger, stitches

Safety Alert Type: 
Firefighting
Location: 
Martin Mountain (near Monte Creek, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-05-19
Company Name: 
Interfor (Adams Lake Div.)
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Logging crew was actively fighting an operation fire. A supervisor (in a rushing state) was attempting to replace a non-functional water pump with a working one.

In the process of unbuckling the intake connection, the supervisor had to pull extremely hard on the key ring (he had no knife to cut the zap strap) to break the seal.

The key ring could not sustain the pulling force and quickly spread apart – the sharp end of the ring sliced through the supervisor’s middle finger. He was not wearing work gloves.

The supervisor required medical attention and received 3 stitches in his finger. He just missed cutting the tendons.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Force yourself to slow down in high pressure situations. Give yourself time to think things through.
  • Always wear appropriate PPE (including work gloves).
  • Consider changing out key rings on suction hose intakes. Possible solutions could be zap-straps, nylon coated aircraft cable key rings, etc.
  • Consider always carrying a pocket tool (leatherman, knife, etc.)

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Ed Coombes (250) 679-6863 or Dan Todd (250-374-5552)

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-Adams_Lake_2015-5-19.pdf

Pickup truck hits bump, opens up a sinkhole

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
near Bamfield (west coast Vancouver Island)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-05-21
Company Name: 
Baseline Archaeological Services Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

At approximately 8:45am a worker was driving a pickup truck between the Blenheim Mainline and spur road B500 near Bamfield (on the west coast of Vancouver Island) and felt a large bump in the road with the truck’s left rear tire.

At the end of the day, the worker was returning home on the same road and spotted a sinkhole. It was likely caused (or made much worse) by the contact with the truck tire earlier that day.

The sinkhole was marked with spray paint around the opening and painted sticks were placed upright for added visibility (see photo in attached pdf).

The worker advised a safety representative who sent an immediate notification to the company who is using the road and is responsible for it.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Resource roads which look intact or stable may not be. Take special caution on eroding roads and areas near bridges.
  • Reporting immediately such hazards may prevent serious accidents by others using the road.
  • Marking around sinkholes is important to make the hole as visible as possible, helping to prevent any further accidents before the road can be repaired.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Stephanie Allester, safety representative at Baseline Archaeological Services Ltd.: sallester@shaw.ca 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Baseline_2015-5-21.pdf

Improperly stowed equipment on ATV causes unexpected throttle engagement

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
Castlegar Woodlands (Interfor)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-05-29
Company Name: 
Interfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Operator was turning around an All Terrain Vehicle on a narrow trail in a cutblock with a shovel wedged between his legs for transport.

As the operator was backing towards the downslope edge of the trail, the shovel handle came into contact with the throttle as the steering was cranked (see photos in attached pdf). This accelerated the ATV in reverse gear over the edge of the trail to a level location 1.5 meters below.

The operator suffered bruised ribs and elbow as a result. This incident could have been much more serious.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Ensure all equipment is properly stowed when operating an ATV
  • Ensure all ATV operators have been properly trained and have all the necessary protective equipment
  • When possible, back ATV towards cut or upslope position to avoid backing over road edge
  • Consider if anything could inadvertently strike throttle during operations
  • Avoid use of ATV whenever possible.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

David Jackson (250) 265-6107 david.jackson@interfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-Castlegar_2015-5-29.pdf

Trip Cable Bell: update to a previous hazard alert posted on March 3, 2015

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Throughout British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-05-25
Company Name: 
Interfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

This memo serves as a clarification to the Hazard Alert Bulletin Dated March 3, 2015.

Interfor’s safety consultants "First Choice Truck Safety and Consulting" have concluded a thorough investigation into the failures of “D" rings (Tripping Bells). The following information has been compiled for the drivers and owners of all log haulers contracted to Interfor.

INVESTIGATION RESULTS – FACTS FOUND

  • “IF LESS THAN 10%” of the cross-sectional areas of the Tripping Bell has been lost due to a significant gouge or nick, then it must be repaired by rounding out with a die grinder to further avoid cracking
  • “IF MORE THAN 10%” of the cross sectional areas of the Tripping Bell has been lost due to a significant gouge or nick, then the Tripping Bell must be replaced as it has become “UNUSABLE".
  • “THE CURRENT PRACTICE” when changing out a defective cable by beating the end of the Tripping Bell is NOT acceptable unless the Tripping Bell is going to be discarded as well.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Driver Daily Inspection of each tripping bell at beginning of their shift and every time after the tripping system is used.
  • Installation of a "cable guide" on bunk base to control the cable movement, while under pressure during unloading. This will limit damage to the bell from hitting other metal components and causing nicks or gouges.
  • When a bell is found with less than the 10% loss factor, the process of grinding out a nick or gouge is recommended and allowed, however this process should be completed by a certified welder.
  • When changing out a defective cable and utilizing the existing acceptable tripping bell, the cable should be cut off, and the tripping bell placed between two pieces of wood secured into a vise. The free end of the cable must be hammered towards the bell. During this process the bell must not be struck by the hammer, unless the hammer is of a composite cast, standard head, soft- faced hammer.
  • At no time during the use of the tripping system or replacing a cable, is the tripping bell to be hit to cause the mushrooming effect that was commonly found during the inspections.
  • In addition, if any bell has a crack, has 10% or greater loss factor, or the throat portion has been increased by 15 % of the original opening measurement, then it is deemed “UNUSABLE”.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Lana Kurz, RPF Interfor Woodlands Safety and Environment Forester, Interior Operations lana.kurz@interfor.com 

File attachments
HAZARD Alert Tripping Bell May 25 2015.pdf

Improperly loaded machine on lowbed results in collision with pickup truck on resource road

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
Northern Interior
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-04-05
Company Name: 
Canfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A lowbed was travelling off-highway with a loader incorrectly loaded on the trailer (i.e., sideways) when it encountered a pickup on a narrow section of the road.

The pickup driver struck the track of the incorrectly loaded machine as it swerved trying to avoid the lowbed tractor, resulting in extensive damage to the pickup.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

 

Hazard:

  • Loader loaded incorrectly by not being loaded as narrow as possible.
  • Driver had never been preworked on the Wide Loads/Low Bedding Equipment FSR Procedures.
  • Increased public traffic as incident occurred on the weekend.
  • Lowbed driver made the assumption that no traffic was approaching, as pickup did not have a radio.

Preventative Actions:

  • Contractor will schedule a training session to train ALL crew members on Regional Road Safety Procedures, including those that specifically apply to all oversized loads and low-bed moves wider than 10’6” (3.2 meters) outside of an active worksite.
  • Contractor will update their new hire indoctrination program to ensure that it includes Regional Road Safety Procedures.
  • Contractor will review their own Lowbed Operator Safe Work Procedures with all their drivers.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Tyson von den Steinen, RPF - Canadian Forest Products Ltd. Tyson.vondenSteinen@canfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Canfor_2015-4-5.pdf

Snowshoes can be a tripping hazard - especially when snow levels are low

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
Northern Interior
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-04-10
Company Name: 
Canfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Hazard:

  • Using snowshoes at a particular time of year when snow coverage is sparse (i.e., increased exposure to tripping hazards).
  • Substantial amount of blowdown in the block.
  • Minimal protection offered by wearing thin/lightweight pants.
  • Personal First Aid Kits not available in the sterile condition required.

Incident Summary:

  • The crew debated wearing snowshoes during the safety tailgate meeting due to the partial snow levels.
  • The back of the snowshoe got caught on a branch as the employee stepped over a log while laying out a cutblock.
  • The employee fell forward and landed on a broken branch stub, causing a puncture wound just above their knee that required a tetanus shot and 4 stiches to treat.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Preventative Actions:

  • Looking for an alternate snowshoe design that will limit the opportunity for sticks/branches to get caught up in them (i.e., web less).

Communicate to field crews the following:

  1. The importance of maintaining 3pts of contact at all times when climbing over obstacles.
  2. Encourage them to consider wearing more durable clothing as an additional form of PPE (i.e., Carhartt pants).
  3. The importance of storing First Aid Kits and providing them with weather proof bag/container to do so.
  4. The importance of communicating incidents as per the Abnormality Escalation Process timelines.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Tyson von den Steinen, RPF - Canadian Forest Products Ltd.

Tyson.vondenSteinen@canfor.com

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Canfor-Snowshoes-Apr_10-15.pdf

Quick reaction saves pickup driver from likely head-on collision with transport truck

Safety Alert Type: 
Paved Roads
Location: 
West Kootenay region (Highway 3a)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-04-07
Company Name: 
Long Line Enterprises Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A forestry consultant left for work at 6:40 a.m., travelling west on Highway 3a in a pickup with a sled deck hauling a snow machine.

The driver was traveling on a winding section of highway, when he saw approaching in the oncoming lane a transport truck that had failed to navigate the corner. The big rig crossed the center line and slammed into the side of the pickup truck, sending it skidding out of control along the ditch. The pickup eventually came to rest in the middle of the highway while the transport truck went into the ditch (see photos in attached pdf).

The driver of the transport truck was sent to hospital with an injury to his foot. The driver of the pickup was not injured. Both drivers were wearing seatbelts. Due to the quick reaction by the pickup driver to avoid a head on collision, potential serious injury or fatality may have been avoided.

The damage to the transport truck was estimated at $10,000. The pickup, sled deck and snow machine were a total write off. The driver of the transport truck was issued a violation ticket for distracted driving.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Plan ahead of time to avoid distractions, including turning off the cell phone
  • Complete all phone calls and text messages before you travel, or ask a passenger to place/receive calls
  • Don’t multi task while behind the wheel, concentrate on your driving and watch out for other drivers.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kirk Daley, Long Line Enterprises Ltd. (250) 505-9028

File attachments
Safety_Alert_LongLine Ent_2015-4-7.pdf

July 2014 - Radio Communication Changes

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2014-07-04
Company Name: 
BCFSC
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Resource road (RR) radio channels and call protocols have changed and the switch over has already occurred in some regions of British Columbia. Additional regions will be implementing the switch over through the remainder of 2015 and possibly the first quarter of 2016. Contact your local Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO) office or call FrontCounter BC at 1-877-855-3222 to find out when the change will be happening in your area.

The new communication protocols are:

  1. Standardized radio communications signage
  2. A set of dedicated resource road radio channels
  3. Standardized call procedures

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

What You Need to Know

  • Be proactive. Have your radios programmed with the new bank of standard Resource Road channels before the new channels officially start being used. Keep the old frequencies until you are certain you no longer require them..
  • Follow posted channels and radio call procedures. Conduct radio checks to ensure you are on the correct channel for your area, and that it is functioning properly.
  • Follow posted channels and radio call procedures. Conduct radio checks to ensure that you are on the correct channel and that it is functioning properly.
  • In areas undergoing transition to the new Resource Road channels and call protocols, there may be road users on an old radio channel. The best practice is to follow the signage (use the posted radio channel) and exercise additional caution. If possible, inform them of the changes.
  • Remember that almost all resource roads are radio assisted, not radio controlled.

File attachments
aom_jul2014_RadioCommunciationChanges.pdf
AOM_July_2014_RadioCommunciationChanges-UPDATED-Apr2015.pdf
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