HAZARD ALERT : Cab Tilt System Failure

Safety Alert Type: 
Mechanical Service (Field)
Location: 
Coastal British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-09-26
Company Name: 
Nootka Sound Timber Co. Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Mechanics were sent out to check the cab tilt system on a Madill 3800c. They found wiring needing repair for the system to function. After the repair was made, the cab was cleared of equipment & debris and anchor bolts were removed.

The cab tilt function was engaged and the cab began to rise as it should. When the cab reached an elevated level of approximately 6” it fell forward extremely fast. The mechanics immediately tried to reverse the cab by pushing the button in the opposite direction but it continued forward until it struck the track and the ground. In the process, the anchor strap came tight and broke under the strain.

At that point the house cylinder was over-extended and the rod was pulled from the cylinder (see photos in attached pdf), breaking at the piston retainer nut. Both mechanics were in the clear and were not injured in the incident. The investigation determined that there was no oil in the hydraulic cab tilt cylinder. Having no fluid to restrict the piston in the cylinder, there was no way the weight of the cab would be supported. It was also determined that the house /cab hydraulic power pack had been replaced at some point so the likelihood of air in the system was high.

This particular cab had not been tilted in a long time, factors which were not considered before lowering the cab.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • If a particular machine has not had a cab tilt function performed in considerable time, the cylinder rod should be unpinned and completely cycled to purge the system, and ensure the system is operating correctly before performing the actual cab tilt function.
  • Any time repairs have been made to the house / cab hydraulic power pack, the system must be purged to ensure all air is removed from the system and that fluid levels are adequate.
  • Amend relevant Job Safety Breakdown procedures to reflect the above findings.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Virginia Mountan (250) 830-2292

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Nootka_Sound_Timber_2015-9-26.pdf

Advisory: LED lamps can interfere with a vehicle’s radio transmissions

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-09-30
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

There have been numerous complaints about LED light bulbs interfering with vehicle radio transmissions.

The level of interference varies depending on the installation of the LED lights. The closer the radio antenna is to the lights, the greater the level of interference. Some brands of LED lights are worse than others.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Place the antenna further away from the LED lights (i.e.: install on roof)
  • Install a filter on the lead electrical wires (lines) going to the lights (filter weakens the power emissions of the lights, minimizing the radio interference). The filter is available at your local radio communications shop or auto parts stores (approximate cost of $20/filter)
  • Use a different brand of LED lights

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Contact your local radio communications sales & service provider.

File attachments
Safety_Alert_LED lights-radio interference-Sept-30-2015.pdf

ATV impact with water bar throws driver from machine

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
Side road off the Tulameen Forest Service Road (Cascades Forest District)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-09-08
Company Name: 
Cascadia Environmental Services Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

While driving an All-Terrain Vehicle on a temporarily deactivated road, the operator of the ATV was launched over the handle bars after failing to see a *water bar soon enough to slow down and safely ride through it.

The water bar was difficult to see until it was too late. The driver hit the handle bars with his left shin and right foot, and impacted the ground with the helmet and his left shoulder. Prior to the incident the ATV was travelling at approximately 20 km/h.

(*The purpose of a water bar is to capture and direct road surface water from the road into the ditch line or across the road surface beyond the shoulder of the road.)

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Corrective Actions:

  • When riding a road for the first time ride very slow to assess the hazards
  • Don’t take for granted a nice looking, straight, flat stretch of road - especially when you know there has been some level of deactivation

Learnings & Suggestions:

  • Mark the location of water bars - particularly ones that are hard to see - as they are encountered with a piece of ribbon or paint

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Cascadia Environmental Services Ltd., Abbotsford, BC (604) 287-3225

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Cascadia_waterbar_2015-9-8.pdf

Kenworth’s Nautilus navigation system interfering with Resource Road Radio Channel 13

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
Prince George area
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-08-31
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A contractor in Prince George operates a fleet of 5 Kenworth heavy trucks, all equipped with Kenworth’s Nautilus navigation system. Drivers of these particular trucks have reported that when their radio is on Resource Road channel 13, all they hear over the radio is squelch noise.

The radios transmit fine – others can hear the transmissions unless they’re also driving a Kenworth that features the Nautilus navigation system. The contractor is currently using the TAD M10 radio and has also tested with an ICOM and found the same problem. The contractor reports that all other resource road radio channels are working and appear unaffected.

The contractor went to the shop where the radios were purchased. The shop identified that the Nautilus navigation system creates a harmonic frequency that can cause interference with radio use. The problem does not occur when the navigation system is turned-off.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • The contractor has installed an On/Off switch in his fleet of Kenworth trucks that allows the navigation system to be shut off while operating on resource roads which stops the interference from the system and allows the mobile radio to function properly.
  • Kenworth, the navigation system manufacturer, Industry Canada and Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations have been advised of this issue.
  • Results of investigations shall be provided as they are available.

Item to Note: MFLNRO should be informed of interference issues that are not isolated to particular, single vehicles but appear to be widespread, so that they can be addressed and necessary fixes can be communicated out to users.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Transportation and Northern Safety, BC Forest Safety Council – Prince George (toll free 877-741-1060) or Transport@bcforestsafe.org

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Kenworth_Nav_System_2015-8-31.pdf

Cougar sighting a reminder to be prepared

Safety Alert Type: 
Wildlife encounter
Location: 
Rutherford Creek, 16.2km (Sea-to-Sky Corridor)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-08-26
Company Name: 
Chartwell Consultants Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Two workers had just finished setting up equipment for a bridge site plan survey when they turned to see a cougar on the road about 30 metres away. The cougar sat for a few moments before bolting into the woods.

The workers returned to the truck, ensuring they made a lot of noise. Back at the truck, they fired off a few bear bangers and then continued to work, while keeping watch. The work day was completed without further sightings or incident.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Setting up next to a noisy, fast flowing creek probably prevented the cougar from hearing the workers before it came upon them. The cougar’s behavior indicated that it was not predatory. The workers believed they may have startled it.
  • Ensure that workers are staying aware of their surroundings, particularly in the morning and evening. When working next to a loud stream, ensure that you are making noise to warn off and avoid surprising any wildlife in the area.
  • In this case, one of the bear bangers used was old and turned out to be defective – ensure that all equipment is in good condition before going out into the field.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kari Zuehlke Safety coordinator, Chartwell Consultants Ltd. (604) 973-1100 kzuehlke@chartwell-consultants.com

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Chartwell_Consultants_2015-8-26.pdf

Rock hits excavator operator's eye through open front window of machine's cab

Safety Alert Type: 
Road Building/Deactivation
Location: 
near Port McNeill, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-08-23
Company Name: 
Interfor - Coastal Woodlands Div.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

While building a road an excavator operator was struck in the eye by a rock that shot through an open front window.

Hazard: Open windows and doors pose a hazard to machine operators as falling, flying, or intruding objects can enter the cab unexpectedly.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Actions to Prevent a Re-Occurrence:

  • Windows and doors must be closed when actively working. Exceptions may include equipment mobilization or short duration precision-work such as bridge and wood box culvert construction. However, prior to commencing these activities a risk assessment must be completed to ensure operator safety.
  • Fix broken air conditioners so operators are not tempted to open a window or door that was meant to protect them.
  • If working with an open crawler tractor, do not put machine in a situation where material can enter the cab.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Rob Ravai, RPF, Interfor, Coastal Woodlands Division, Rob.Ravai@Interfor.com  (250) 286-5116

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-Coastal Woodlands_2015-8-23.pdf

Over height log trucks strike construction scaffold

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Highway 19 Nimpkish River Bridge (Port McNeill, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-08-24
Company Name: 
Certified Coating Specialists Inc.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The Nimpkish River Bridge (also known as the “Green Bridge”) south of Port McNeill, is currently undergoing regular maintenance. Scaffolding has been erected to provide work platforms for the painters and sandblasters.

Although a height restriction of 4.5 metres is in place and clearly marked with signage, the overhead scaffold structure has been struck twice by logging trucks that are exceeding this limit, resulting in damage to the support system of the structure.

Danger to bridge workers: As the overhead structure supports a work platform, this exposes any workers on the structure to serious injury should the structure collapse as a result of being struck by over height traffic.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Traffic control personnel will be monitoring loads, and additional signage is in place.
  • To avoid further incidents, communication of the height restriction is required not only to the truck drivers, but to log loaders and other individuals responsible for log truck load sizes, to ensure that any vehicles that will need to utilize the Green Bridge remain at less than 4.5 meters.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Dustin Vipond, Certified Coating Specialists Inc. (250) 713-4505

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Nimpkish River Bridge_2015-8-24.pdf

HAZARD: Short logs on top of loads

Safety Alert Type: 
Yarding and Loading
Location: 
Vancouver Island
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-08-27
Company Name: 
Island Timberlands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Short logs are challenging to load. Ensure you take the time to secure them properly. Short logs that are unsecured have come off loads during transit and unloading, which could have resulted in serious injuries (see photos in attached pdf).

Unsecured short logs also cause safety concern upon unloading at dry land sorts as logs may fall off or out of grapples.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Short logs and chunks must not be placed on top of the load when there would be a possibility of them rolling off in transit or when the load is dumped. Ensure you inspect your load prior to departure.

COMMUNICATION IS KEY – If you create a load that is double tiered or contains potential hazards that are secured, let the truck driver know. The driver can then communicate that information to the sort upon arrival and before being unloaded.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Island Timberlands, Northwest Bay office (250) 468-6810

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Island_Timberlands_2015-8-27.pdf

Cougar encounter in West Kootenay region

Safety Alert Type: 
Wildlife encounter
Location: 
Koch Creek area
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-08-14
Company Name: 
Interfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Development field workers were alerted to the presence of a cougar by their dog. The cougar mauled the dog but the wildcat eventually ran away when workers yelled and threw rocks at it.

Hazard: Cougars can be elusive and stealthy, allowing them to come into close proximity with field workers. Cougars accustomed to wolves may behave aggressively with dogs.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Actions to Prevent a Re-Occurrence:

  • The best line of defense is becoming aware of when a cougar (or bear) has entered your immediate working area.
  • A “bush-dog” trained to alert or bark when they see wildlife is a benefit. However, an untrained dog that is more like a house-pet can be a detriment to field workers as they may attract the interest of cougars, without alerting workers to their presence.
  • Keep an eye out for signs of wildlife, like prints, scat or other markings.
  • Always carry a means of defense such as pepper spray, bear bangers or air horns. Continually make noise while working in the bush to avoid coming upon or startling wildlife.
  • Try to work in partners or in close proximity to other workers.
  • Relocate if a cougar lingers in your working area.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Ron Palmer, RPF, Interfor, Interior Operations, Ron.Palmer@Interfor.com (250) 265-8543

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor_2015-8-14.pdf

HAZARD: Rocks dislodging from log trucks in BC's Interior regions

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Grand Forks, Castlegar, Adams Lake Divisions (Interfor)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-08-04
Company Name: 
Interfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Several logging trucks were seen with rocks wedged between logs. The public have also complained about rocks flying out from logging trucks on public road systems.

Hazard: Loadermen can accidentally place rocks into loads, which can then fall out during transport.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Actions to Prevent a Re-Occurrence:

  • To prepare roadside log deck storage areas, use a brow log to store logs above ground level.
  • When lifting logs that have been in contact with the ground, drop logs onto the brow log to remove rocks prior to loading onto trucks.
  • Drivers are responsible for their load and are expected to view all sides of load prior to driving.
  • Before entering a highway, drivers should inspect the spaces between dual tires for lodged rocks and other debris.
  • Replace torn-off mud flaps to prevent rocks from flying out from dual tires.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Lana Kurz, RPF, Interfor, Interior Operations, Lana.Kurz@Interfor.com (250) 679-6838

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor_2015-8-4.pdf
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