Improperly loaded machine on lowbed results in collision with pickup truck on resource road

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
Northern Interior
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-04-05
Company Name: 
Canfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A lowbed was travelling off-highway with a loader incorrectly loaded on the trailer (i.e., sideways) when it encountered a pickup on a narrow section of the road.

The pickup driver struck the track of the incorrectly loaded machine as it swerved trying to avoid the lowbed tractor, resulting in extensive damage to the pickup.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

 

Hazard:

  • Loader loaded incorrectly by not being loaded as narrow as possible.
  • Driver had never been preworked on the Wide Loads/Low Bedding Equipment FSR Procedures.
  • Increased public traffic as incident occurred on the weekend.
  • Lowbed driver made the assumption that no traffic was approaching, as pickup did not have a radio.

Preventative Actions:

  • Contractor will schedule a training session to train ALL crew members on Regional Road Safety Procedures, including those that specifically apply to all oversized loads and low-bed moves wider than 10’6” (3.2 meters) outside of an active worksite.
  • Contractor will update their new hire indoctrination program to ensure that it includes Regional Road Safety Procedures.
  • Contractor will review their own Lowbed Operator Safe Work Procedures with all their drivers.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Tyson von den Steinen, RPF - Canadian Forest Products Ltd. Tyson.vondenSteinen@canfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Canfor_2015-4-5.pdf

Snowshoes can be a tripping hazard - especially when snow levels are low

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
Northern Interior
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-04-10
Company Name: 
Canfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Hazard:

  • Using snowshoes at a particular time of year when snow coverage is sparse (i.e., increased exposure to tripping hazards).
  • Substantial amount of blowdown in the block.
  • Minimal protection offered by wearing thin/lightweight pants.
  • Personal First Aid Kits not available in the sterile condition required.

Incident Summary:

  • The crew debated wearing snowshoes during the safety tailgate meeting due to the partial snow levels.
  • The back of the snowshoe got caught on a branch as the employee stepped over a log while laying out a cutblock.
  • The employee fell forward and landed on a broken branch stub, causing a puncture wound just above their knee that required a tetanus shot and 4 stiches to treat.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Preventative Actions:

  • Looking for an alternate snowshoe design that will limit the opportunity for sticks/branches to get caught up in them (i.e., web less).

Communicate to field crews the following:

  1. The importance of maintaining 3pts of contact at all times when climbing over obstacles.
  2. Encourage them to consider wearing more durable clothing as an additional form of PPE (i.e., Carhartt pants).
  3. The importance of storing First Aid Kits and providing them with weather proof bag/container to do so.
  4. The importance of communicating incidents as per the Abnormality Escalation Process timelines.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Tyson von den Steinen, RPF - Canadian Forest Products Ltd.

Tyson.vondenSteinen@canfor.com

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Canfor-Snowshoes-Apr_10-15.pdf

Quick reaction saves pickup driver from likely head-on collision with transport truck

Safety Alert Type: 
Paved Roads
Location: 
West Kootenay region (Highway 3a)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-04-07
Company Name: 
Long Line Enterprises Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A forestry consultant left for work at 6:40 a.m., travelling west on Highway 3a in a pickup with a sled deck hauling a snow machine.

The driver was traveling on a winding section of highway, when he saw approaching in the oncoming lane a transport truck that had failed to navigate the corner. The big rig crossed the center line and slammed into the side of the pickup truck, sending it skidding out of control along the ditch. The pickup eventually came to rest in the middle of the highway while the transport truck went into the ditch (see photos in attached pdf).

The driver of the transport truck was sent to hospital with an injury to his foot. The driver of the pickup was not injured. Both drivers were wearing seatbelts. Due to the quick reaction by the pickup driver to avoid a head on collision, potential serious injury or fatality may have been avoided.

The damage to the transport truck was estimated at $10,000. The pickup, sled deck and snow machine were a total write off. The driver of the transport truck was issued a violation ticket for distracted driving.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Plan ahead of time to avoid distractions, including turning off the cell phone
  • Complete all phone calls and text messages before you travel, or ask a passenger to place/receive calls
  • Don’t multi task while behind the wheel, concentrate on your driving and watch out for other drivers.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kirk Daley, Long Line Enterprises Ltd. (250) 505-9028

File attachments
Safety_Alert_LongLine Ent_2015-4-7.pdf

July 2014 - Radio Communication Changes

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2014-07-04
Company Name: 
BCFSC
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Resource road (RR) radio channels and call protocols have changed and the switch over has already occurred in some regions of British Columbia. Additional regions will be implementing the switch over through the remainder of 2015 and possibly the first quarter of 2016. Contact your local Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO) office or call FrontCounter BC at 1-877-855-3222 to find out when the change will be happening in your area.

The new communication protocols are:

  1. Standardized radio communications signage
  2. A set of dedicated resource road radio channels
  3. Standardized call procedures

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

What You Need to Know

  • Be proactive. Have your radios programmed with the new bank of standard Resource Road channels before the new channels officially start being used. Keep the old frequencies until you are certain you no longer require them..
  • Follow posted channels and radio call procedures. Conduct radio checks to ensure you are on the correct channel for your area, and that it is functioning properly.
  • Follow posted channels and radio call procedures. Conduct radio checks to ensure that you are on the correct channel and that it is functioning properly.
  • In areas undergoing transition to the new Resource Road channels and call protocols, there may be road users on an old radio channel. The best practice is to follow the signage (use the posted radio channel) and exercise additional caution. If possible, inform them of the changes.
  • Remember that almost all resource roads are radio assisted, not radio controlled.

File attachments
aom_jul2014_RadioCommunciationChanges.pdf
AOM_July_2014_RadioCommunciationChanges-UPDATED-Apr2015.pdf

Hidden ice on snowy resource road leaves crew & truck stranded as windstorm topples trees

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
Witches Brook Rd. (near Logan Lake, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-03-02
Company Name: 
Skeetchestn Natural Resources Corporation
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Two workers in a pick-up truck were climbing a windy road along a power line to do site inspection and road recon for a slash pile burning project. The road was steep and a light layer of snow covered it, making a layer of ice underneath invisible.

As the truck lost power attempting to climb, it stopped for a brief moment then started to slide backwards down the road for approximately 25 metres before spinning 180 degrees. The vehicle stopped at this point and was positioned entirely across the road. A small berm at that location is what brought the truck to a complete stop and prevented it from going over the embankment. Although the embankment was not a long distance, damage to the vehicle would have almost certainly occurred.

The driver applied the parking brake, slowly removed their foot from the main brake pedal and then turned off the engine. The crew looked in the truck and realized there were no tools or chains available. They radioed the Natural Resources office in the area and asked for help. Assistance was dispatched with a set of chains for the stranded pick-up truck.

At this point, the workers determined it was unsafe to remain in the vehicle as nearby trees started to crack due to high gusts of wind on site. So they waited further down the road until help arrived. While waiting, a tree did fall in close proximity to the workers and their truck. The crew was able to install chains on the truck and slowly bring the vehicle down to flat area.


Immediate and root cause(s):

  • Inadequate awareness of surroundings
  • Worksite conditions (extreme weather)
  • Inadequate communications between the two crew members
  • Inadequate maintenance / inspections of the vehicle

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Always check vehicles for tools and chains (when winter conditions apply)
  • Ensure that crew members communicate about the check to confirm it was done
  • Exit the vehicle before and have a good look at the road conditions. (In this incident, snow cover had rendered the ice virtually invisible)

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Wynona Britton, Skeetchestn Natural Resources Corporation Wynona@skeetchestn.ca

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_SkeetchestnNRC_2015-3-2.pdf

HAZARD ALERT - Log trailer cable bells need close inspection

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Throughout BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-03-03
Company Name: 
Interfor Corporation
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

This safety alert serves as a “heads-up” to the possibility of a defect with the TRIP CABLE BELL (Part# ANSU3082-25). Interfor's Interior operations have experienced equipment fatigue or failures involving the following trends:

1. D-Ring metal fatigue/breakage

2. Cable wear/extensive fraying

3. Cable bell failure

(see photos in attached pdf)

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • If you have this part on your bunk (stake straps), please inspect for cracking/metal fatigue before further use.
  • Ensure inspections of the D-ring cable bells and the cables themselves are carried out at your pre-trip as well as throughout the day. Fix defective parts found or remove equipment from service.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Interfor, Adams Lake Division (250) 679-3234

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-ANSER_Trip_Cable_Bell_3-3-2015.pdf

Soft road conditions make for difficult steering

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
Shuswap region
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-02-10
Company Name: 
Interfor Corporation (Interior Division)
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Due to abnormally mild weather conditions in the Shuswap region, road conditions on the Adams West FSR are becoming hazardous.

Specifically, the un-travelled portions of the road surface are becoming extremely soft and making it very hard to steer in.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Use caution and slow down when proceeding onto and driving on these portions of the road.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information please contact an Interfor supervisor:

Ed Coombes 250-679-6863

- - - - -

Toby Jeffreys 250-679-2012

- - - - -

Erik Kok 250-679-6842

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-Adams_Lake_02-10-2015.pdf

Wildlife attracted to resource roads in winter conditions – be prepared!

Safety Alert Type: 
Wildlife encounter
Location: 
North Shuswap region
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-01-13
Company Name: 
Interfor Corporation (Interior Division)
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On a number of trips over a period of a week in January, several workers experienced close interactions with wildlife on both provincial highways and logging roads.

Due to heavy snow and freezing rain, animals - and in particular ungulates - have migrated to more traditional wintering grounds.

Deer and moose have also been staying close to plowed roads where there is easier walking conditions and access to road salts, etc.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Be extra aware of the potential for wildlife on roads and especially during dawn and dusk conditions
  • Slow down during these times and stay alert to the potential of an animal crossing the road on short notice
  • Leave extra time to travel to your intended destination as time of day/ daily conditions / location may necessitate lower travel speeds to avoid wildlife.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Michael Scott, Interfor Corporation (250) 679-6843

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-Adams_Lake_2015-1-13.pdf

Serious Incident: Predatory Grizzly Encounter

Safety Alert Type: 
Wildlife encounter
Location: 
Nazko, off the 4000 Rd at 4039, 4km on Run Away Rd. (west of Quesnel)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2014-10-08
Company Name: 
Zanzibar Holdings Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

While surveying, a worker was tracked, approached and then stalked by a mature Grizzly exhibiting predatory behavior. The worker had been dropped off by her co-worker and had just started surveying a forested opening when her dog started growling at a thicket on the edge of the sample plot.

A bear appeared then approached, making no sound and walking with intent towards her. The worker started backing up, bear spray at the ready, yelling loudly and making herself as big as possible with arms fully extended while her dog aggressively barked. The bear hesitated, reassessed, and then resumed stalking again, circling in a predatory manner. The worker kept facing the bear, retreating backwards towards the drop off point on the road. The bear tracked her to the forest edge and then stopped.

Radio contact with the co-worker was attempted without success initially but contact was made by the time the worker made it back to the pickup location. Due to the nature of the incident and the abnormal bear behavior, both workers left that area.

The co-worker had observed the bear after the initial drop off and assessed the animal as travelling in the opposite direction from the worksite and so deemed it not to be a threat. During further interviews with the co-worker after the incident it was noted that the bear had been oddly unafraid of the horn and the moving truck.

On further investigation and discussion with local residents it was reported that firefighters had recently encountered a bear in the area that had shown no fear of workers or bear bangers and had acted aggressively.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • When a bear is sighted, all crew members must be notified and action plan initiated. Recent incidents related to specific work areas should be coordinated through a regional authority.
  • If working in pairs, work within radio contact range of each other whenever possible and check in at designated times.
  • ALWAYS carry bear spray where it is easily accessible. In high risk areas, carry two cans.
  • Bear behaviour may have been affected by recent history forest fires in the area. The bear in this incident could well have been displaced in unfamiliar territory, hungry and confused. This deserves further investigation and consideration in Bear Aware best practices.
  • Carry a SPOT or other type of Satellite communication device.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Sylvia Fenwick-Wilson, Zanzibar Holdings Ltd. (604) 317-4118 or email: sylvia@zanzibar.ca 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Zanzibar_Hldgs_Ltd._2014-10-8.pdf

Equipment operator misses handrail, falls to ground from ladder on his machine

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
St. Leon Creek (near Nakusp, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-02-19
Company Name: 
R & A Logging Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Hook truck operator was climbing up the ladder to the loader. He missed grabbing the upper handrail and fell backwards to the ground.

The fall resulted in a broken heel and possible wrist injury. The investigation confirmed that his footwear was adequate and the ladder was in good condition, with clean rungs.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Evaluate the ergonomics of the movements required for access and departure from the loading platform

• Ensure all rungs, platforms and handrails are clean of debris & oils, conducive to easy grip and footing, and that 3 point contact can be made at all times

• Review 3 point contact procedures and methods with machine operators

• Ensure lighting is adequate, especially in areas where body movements are critical

• Evaluate the use of a fall restraint device to use during access, departure, and while operator is on platform

• Ensure that an effective man-check system is in place for workers working alone, and that workers use an effective communication system to notify others of their actions and status.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Larry Rivers (250) 265-2296

File attachments
Safety_Alert_R_and_A_Logging_2015-2-19.pdf
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