Other Alerts

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
Vancouver Island - Logging Road – Millar Main near Mt Washington
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-04
Company Name: 
Leeward 04 Contracting
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A grader operator was helping the lowbed driver to load the grader on to the lowbed for transport to the shop for repairs. The grader operator had completed his part of the job and went to climb off the lowbed. There was snow on the ground and on the lowbed. There was also mud on the lowbed (from the grader) and it was raining at the time.

The grader operator’s left foot slipped on the mud and snow on the lowbed as he moved to climb off. His leg twisted as he fell and he landed on the ground with all his weight on his left foot. The grader operator heard a crack and felt great pain below his left knee. He could not get up. X-rays later showed that the tibia was broken in three places.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Caution should be taken when surfaces are encountered that may become slippery in cold weather. Whenever possible, three points of contact should be maintained. When climbing up on or down off equipment, every effort should be made to grab hold of something solid with one or both hands.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Don Wilshere, Leeward 04 Contracting, Port Alberni
(250) 723-2220

File attachments
2008-01-04 Broken Leg Caused By Slip.pdf

Other Alerts

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
Southern Interior
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-01
Company Name: 
Galena Contractors Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

An employee was performing his work as a driller’s helper, and he was walking across a muddy area getting reading to light a safety fuse to initiate a blast. There was approximately six inches of mud on the ground – the driller’s helper’s boot got stuck while the helper was walking, and he fell to the ground. When he fell, his right hand struck a rock and the rock cut his hand open.

The worker received on site first aid – the wound was cleaned and bandaged. The worker then returned to work.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Workers must ensure the placement of their feet is determined before they move their feet.

They must also ensure they are knowledgeable of where on the ground their feet will be while moving.

File attachments
2008-01-01 Fall Results In Cut On Hand.pdf

Silviculture/Stand Tending/Fire Fighting

Location: 
CP 716-35, Golden BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-05-26
Company Name: 
Craig Oliver
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Details of Incident: A planter was working on a steep, winter logged section of block. Logging debris levels were high and unstable due to branches landing on snow during harvesting. As the planter reached down to plant a tree a branch scratched his face near the eye. These very fresh blocks pose a higher hazard for the planters. Logging plan changes and fire season closure created a short fall of available ground within the seedlot boundaries.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

A decision was made to transfer seedlings from higher hazard sections of block to sections of a couple other blocks with lower hazard ratings. With extra planning and reallocations for the seedlings we can reduce our hazards to the worker, achieve healthier better plantation stocking. This does mean planting blocks over two planting season which increases planning time. Logging debris will settle over the winter, stabilizing and exposing good microsites. No further hazard abatement will be needed.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

S. Craig Olivier 250 344-6733

File attachments
2008-05-26 Silviculture Stand Tending Fire Fighting.pdf

Silviculture/Stand Tending/Fire Fighting

Location: 
Prince George Woodlands
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-05-14
Company Name: 
Canfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On May 14, 2008, a large tick was discovered and removed from the scalp of a Silviculture staff member’s head by the First Aid attendant on shift at the Northwood Pulpmill.

The staff member had noted a small sore lump on her scalp after returning home from working Saturday supervising planting contractors throughout the Pelican Operating Area. She believed that the lump was probably the result of a small bug bite, such as a spider; as the incident seemed fairly routine, she decided to monitor the bite over the next few days and take action if the situation changed.

Since Saturday, the immediate area surrounding the lump had become inflamed and red, while the back side of her head where the bite was located had become very sensitive and painful to touch in addition to increasing soreness of the neck muscles on the side affected by the bite. She had been checking out the area with mirrors at night but could not see more than a discolored lump between all the hair follicles.

Recognizing that the situation had changed, she brought her concerns to a few fellow co-workers within Prince George Woodlands. After a few second opinions, she decided to visit the Level Three First Aid Attendant on-site located adjacent to the Canfor Administration Centre at Northwood Pulpmill. The first aid attendant inspected the area of concern under a high-powered magnifying glass; he subsequently agreed that the lump appeared to be a tick.

The tick was removed by heating up a metal rod on a stovetop element and consecutively burning the tick in the backside, as this was agreed on by the individuals occupying the Pulpmill’s security office, as well as the patient, as the known ‘best practice’ for safe tick removal. The tick proceeded to back itself out partially from the burning treatments, but was finally removed with force from tweezers. The affected area was cleansed with an antiseptic wipe and sent back to work.

After researching information regarding tick prevalence, associated diseases and action plans in the case of an incident over the internet, the tick was packaged alive and will be couriered to the BC Center for Disease Control in Vancouver for correct species identification and preserved for future reference. Though it is possible for the tick to be tested for the known bacteria and/or diseases that they may host, the Center will only conduct testing if the affected individual reports symptoms associated with the diseases.

As a result of this First Aid Incident, the following key messages are provided:

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  1. Wear light colored clothing whenever possible; tuck in your shirt to your pants and your pants into your work boots if possible to reduce any skin exposure;
  2. Walk on cleared trails wherever possible, as ticks usually attach themselves to you as you pass through brush or tall grass (ticks do not fly and they also do not drop from tree crowns);
  3. Use insect repellent at your discretion as it could deter tick bites.
  4. Complete a ‘tick check’ for yourselves and your canine companions at the end of every field day, whether your skin was covered or not. Focus on areas of greater perspiration such as your scalp, underarms and groin area.
  5. Do not stop if you have found one tick – continue to search your whole body (or that of your dog) to ensure there are no additional risks to infection.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 
File attachments
2008-05-14 Tick Bites.pdf

Planning & Management

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
West Kootenays - Tam O’ Shanter Creek Near Riondel, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-05-07
Company Name: 
Adam Rodgers, RPF
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The Grizzly Bear incident occurred on May 7, 2008. Worker ‘x’ was working alone for the day but was in radio contact with other crews (approximately 1km away). His specific task was to hang ribbon to identify the location for a proposed road. Worker ‘x’ attended a tailgate safety meeting that morning and was aware of potential hazards on the site, including animal awareness (a cougar had recently been observed in the vicinity). At approximately 10am, Worker ‘x’ came face to face with a 2 year old Grizzly Bear. He froze and watched as the bear approached. He tried to call on his hand-held radio for assistance but was partially unsuccessful because the radio was located in an inside pocket in his ‘cruising vest’. By the time he got his radio out, the bear was dangerously close (arms length away). Acting under instinct Worker ‘x’ dropped all his field gear, turned and ran downhill with only his radio in hand. Worker ‘x’ was issued Bear spray but did not carry his personal protective equipment device with him that day. While running, He managed to key the mike a couple of times; however, the conversation was fragmented on the receiving end. Other crewmembers believed Worker ‘x’ was being mauled by the bear and initiated a response based on the written emergency evacuation procedure for the site. The safety certification auditor called for an ambulance. The first aid attendant and helper began hiking towards Worker ‘x’. By the time Worker ‘x’ was approximately 500m away from the first grizzly encounter, he was still running and was full of emotion. As he came upon a very steep slope, he fell down and bruised his knee and chipped his tooth. As he stood up, he discovered the Grizzly Bear had continued to follow him through the forest. Worker ‘x’ was again at an arms length away from the bear. The Grizzly was standing on all 4 legs above Worker ‘x’ and swayed side to side. By then, Worker ‘x’ had begun to experience symptoms of stress and of minor shock. Worker ‘x’ began to yell and scream for his life because he was afraid and was without bear spray / bear bangers. Fortunately the bear did not come any closer. After a couple of minutes, the Grizzly Bear lost interest and moved on. By 10:30am, the supervisor and first aid attendant had arrived at the scene and found Worker ‘x’ to be aware and safe. His level of shock was minor yet he was very disturbed by the incident. The first aid attendant and helper proceeded to sweep of the area to ensure the bear had left. The first aid attendant radioed the safety auditor to use his cell phone to call off the ambulance. Worker ‘x’ and everyone else left the forest and discussed the event for an hour or so at the trucks before deciding to call it a day.

It should be noted it is difficult to enforce standard operating procedures for bear
encounters. Worker ‘x’ chose to run and he was not attacked. In our opinion he made the right choice because he is still alive. Whether or not he would have been attacked if he chose to back away slowly (as per the bear aware seminar) is not part of this investigation.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Bear spray and/or bangers MUST be carried (1 per crew and 1 per person if working alone) at ALL times between March 1st and November 30th.
  • Ensure hand held radios are readily available, especially in the event of an emergency.
  • When working alone, make sure you are aware of your surroundings. It is important to look at terrain features when locating a road, but also to look outside the road prism for hazards such as curious bears.
  • Back away slowly from any Grizzly Bear encounter.

 

File attachments
2008-05-07 Face to Face with a Grizzly.pdf

Planning & Management

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
Blue and Gold road, Nelson BC.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-31
Company Name: 
Kalesnikoff Lumber Co. Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

While plowing snow between 3.5 km and 4 km on Blue and Gold road, a grader operator witnessed two separate avalanches a short distance ahead of the grader. Both slides initiated in a cut block, 1 above the road and 1 below the road. The slides initiated on approximately a 60% slope and covered a combined area of about 1 hectare. The slides consisted of fresh storm snow sliding on a buried hoar frost layer and were considered a class 2 avalanche. The slides totaled a width of about 100m wide and ran for about 150 m. The average slab depth was 40 cm. The suspected cause of the slides was likely a combination of the above snow conditions and the vibration from the grader. A harvesting crew arrived on site a short time after the slide occurred and immediately reported the incident to the company harvesting supervisor. The harvesting supervisor visited the site and shut down operations in the area until conditions stabilized. Weekend weather was predicting more snowfall with increased avalanche activity. The gate at the bottom of the road was locked limiting further access to this site.

This is the first time that this type of event has occurred in this area during the duration of forestry activities in the area.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  1. Professional avalanche risk assessments or other mitigative actions may need to be conducted prior to forestry operations in other areas with similar site conditions.
  2. If avalanche activity is noted in any area of operations, stop work and contact your supervisor for further direction.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kalesnikoff Lumber Co. Ltd. – Woodlands
Phone: (250) 399-4211

File attachments
2008-01-31 Avalanche Witnessed.pdf

Planning & Management

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
Southern Interior
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-01
Company Name: 
MacLeod Forest Services Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Our Job Safety Analysis indicates that log hauling and road use are likely areas for incidents to occur. The results of any road incident are likely to be severe. Increased and focused harvesting in response to the pine beetle increases the potential for a serious road related accident. Most contractors have access to trained and equipped first aid attendants and ETV’s however if the accident traps a worker in the vehicle or if the vehicle is down a steep bank specialized rescuers and equipment may be required (Jaws of Life, rope rescue). While assisting several harvesting contractors in preparing their emergency evacuation plans we contacted BC Ambulance, local Fire Departments and other rescue services in various towns to find out how far up logging roads they could respond. We discovered there may be limitations on rescue agencies abilities to respond to resource road accidents. BC Ambulance may not go off main roads due to vehicle limitations and depending on the experience of attendants. Fire Departments may not be authorized to leave their designated protection area or may not be equipped with trucks capable of negotiating resource roads. Search and Rescue is not likely to be equipped for vehicle rescue.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Pre-planning is important to ensure any potential rescue/evacuation is as efficient as possible. This pre-planning is best conducted by the prime contractor for a road system which is likely the Licensee(s). Prior to work commencing on a road system Licensees should contact the closest emergency services to coordinate a response plan. This planning process must include discussions about:

1. Areas to be worked, timing of projects and volume of traffic.

2. Key areas (narrow sections, sharp curves, steep side hills, historical problem sites)

3. Quality of the roads (grades, maintenance, road surface).

4. Responder limitations (jurisdiction, training, vehicle) and solutions.

5. Rendezvous points where manpower and equipment may be transferred to pickups.

Licensees should ensure that their emergency plan for any road related incident includes:

1. Immediately after notice of an accident is broadcast all traffic stops at the closest available pullout and stays stopped until given the all clear.

2. The closest radio equipped empty/up vehicles marshal at the rendezvous point (likely 0 km) to act as guides to rescue vehicles.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Doug MacLeod 250-499-2785 Email: dmacleod@nethop.net

File attachments
2008-01-01 Planning for the Worst.pdf

Planning & Management

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
Hope, B.C. American Creek Block AM111
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-08
Company Name: 
Infinity-Pacific Stewardship Group
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

At approximately 12:00pm a crew of two field workers stopped for lunch in a block in the American Creek area near Hope, B.C. While stopped they heard a growl and saw something moving in the bush nearby. A bear banger was shot into the air and the crew moved away from the area of encounter. At approximately 12:30pm a cougar was sighted at a distance of ~50 meters; it was growling and hissing at thecrew. Another bear banger was used to deter the cougar and the crew decided that it would be most appropriate to leave the block for the remainder of the day. It is unknown why the cougar acted aggressively towards the field crew, it may have been protecting a kill or its young, or it may have been hungry, curious, or territorial.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

It was reiterated to the field crew that they acted appropriately by leaving the area once the cougar had been sighted and a threat had been identified. It was decided that crews should exercise extra caution when working in this area, and that all workers should keep a look out for fresh cougar signs. A cougar awareness and information sheet was distributed to all employees so they are aware of what to do in case of another encounter. The supervisor of the block decided that no one should work alone in this area for the remainder of the block layout. Lastly, radio communication and check in systems were reviewed to ensure that all crews work in the safest conditions possible and can respond quickly to any future encounters.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Chris Gruenwald; IPSG: 604-460-1390 ext.231

File attachments
2007-11-08 Cougar Sighted.pdf

2008-01-14 Damage to crew transport vehicle

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Sorting
Location: 
Ingram Creek
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-14
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A crew truck was parked on the landing well out of the way of the loading operations when the crew started work in the morning. An incident occurred just before daybreak. It was snowing at the time. A logging truck contractor arrived on the landing, waiting to be loaded. The pick up was used during the time the trucker was sitting on the landing and re-parked in a different spot off to the side of the landing. The truck driver thought he should move back to allow the loader and truck currently being loaded a bit more room. While the logging truck contractor was backing up he did not see the pickup was in a blind spot. The jeep caught the front fender on the driver’s side of the parked pickup, damaging the vehicle.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Continually check your mirrors to ensure nothing is behind you while backing up.
Backup lights aid visibility in early morning activities.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

 

BC Forest Safety Council

 

“Unsafe is Unacceptable”

 

File attachments
2008-01-14 Damage to crew transport vehicle.pdf

Mechanical Harvesting

Location: 
Coastal Dry Land Sort
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-04-15
Company Name: 
Alpine Backhoe Services Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Front end loader was taking first scoop of logs off a logging truck. The ‘D’ on the stake line that was holding the driver’s side truck stake upright, broke. The stake fell to the ground allowing some logs to fall off. Inspection of broken ‘D’ revealed a small crack.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Follow O.H.S. Reg.26.66 (8) Stake and bunk assemblies must be inspected daily, and must not be used if they show signs of excessive wear.
  • Ensure M.V.I. thoroughly inspects stake and bunk assemblies.
  • This close call also emphasizes the importance of restraining the load before the cinches are removed.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Neil McIver, Alpine Backhoe Services Ltd. 250-287-2220

File attachments
2008-04-15 Mechanical Failure.pdf
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