Equipment Bulletins

Safety Alert Type: 
Heavy Equipment
Location: 
Princeton
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-04-17
Company Name: 
Weyerhaeuser
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A logging contractor has recently brought forth the following safety alert for log haulers and loader operators when unloading and hooking up log truck trailers.

When the loader is operating from the “blind position” (with the boom blocking the view of the truck and trailer) the truck driver is at risk of being struck by the trailer as the loader is positioning it for hook up. This position also forces the loader operator to be operating their equipment from an awkward position increasing the risk of an unplanned movement of the machine.

The cause of this situation is due to the lifting strap being positioned close to the rear axles where the strap is needed for lifting the trailer off of the truck. One solution is to install a second strap closer to the end of the reach (near the compensator) as shown in the pictures that follow.

If the loading area (being relatively flat) and/or the trailer brake system allows (trailer brakes can be set on) the loader may release the trailer, after unloading it from the truck, and grab a lifting strap positioned closer to the slide along the reach. This will allow the loader to have a better view of the truck driver while hooking up the trailer.

If the trailer brakes cannot be set and the loading area is too sloped to release the trailer, the loader can position itself (if possible) closer to the rear of the trailer to give itself a better view of the truck driver’s position.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

The loader operator and the truck driver both have a responsibility to ensure the safety of the truck driver while hooking up the trailer for loading.

  1. Have a secondary lifting strap installed on the reach closer to the slide to allow the loader operator a better view of the truck driver while operating with the boom restricting the view of the truck and trailer.
  2. If the landing and/or trailer do not permit (too steep/no trailer brakes), or a secondary strap is not installed, position the loader towards the rear of the trailer to give the loader operator a better view of the truck driver while hooking up the trailer.
  3. If possible, always have the loader operator unload and position the trailer for hook up from the truck driver’s side of the truck. This will give the loader operator the best view of the truck driver.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Peter Forbes, RPF
Logging Supervisor
Weyerhaeuser
(250) 295-4294

File attachments
2008-04-17 Operating from the blind position.pdf

Equipment Bulletins

Safety Alert Type: 
Heavy Equipment
Location: 
Moffat Lakes Road (James Mountain area)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-28
Company Name: 
Westline Harvesting
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On January 28, 2008 one of our loaded Super-B-Train logging trucks encountered braking problems at 1.5 km on the Moffat Lakes Road (James Mountain area) and resulted in the truck and trailers upsetting. Upon brake applications, the pup trailer kept pushing the lead trailer sideways, and not allowing the driver to slow the vehicle in a controllable manner. The driver realized he was a approaching a steeper road section with a sharp corner, and made a heavy brake application to get the vehicle stopped prior to the hill and corner. Upon the heavy brake application, the pup shoved the lead trailer into the snow bank / ditch line, which caused the trailers to upset in the ditch and in turn caused the truck to upset on the road. The investigation identified that the air service line valve to the pup trailer had not been opened by the driver, which caused the pup trailer to have no braking power, and reduced the over-all braking power of the vehicle by 25% The truck and trailers sustained substantial damage due to twisted frames. There were no injuries in this incident. However, the incident had the potential causing a serious injury and/or a fatality.

ROOT CAUSES:

  • The driver failed to follow procedure and open the service line air valve on the brake system to the pup trailer.
  • The driver failed to properly monitor / check his braking system and valves prior to departure.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Ensure that all air lines and valves are open, and that brakes are functioning properly prior to departure.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

David Whitwell at 250-392-4822

File attachments
2008-01-28 Braking Problem.pdf

Equipment Bulletins

Safety Alert Type: 
Heavy Equipment
Location: 
Mackenzie Woodlands
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-17
Company Name: 
Canfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The employee picked up a vehicle from the service department at Schultz GMC in Prince George after having the 50,000 km service completed. This included inspection of the brakes which necessitated removal of the wheels. After having put on approximately 20-30 km’s, the employee noticed an unusual noise coming from the rear of the truck as he was driving up the Hart highway on the way back to Mackenzie. He pulled into the parking lot of the next available business to try and locate the source of the noise and found that the lug nuts on the rear driver’s side wheel were finger loose. He immediately contacted the service department at Schultz to inform them of the problem. He then jacked up the truck and torqued the lug nuts and checked the other wheels. The lug nuts on the passenger side rear wheel were also loose. The lug nuts were tightened on the remaining wheels and the employee proceeded to Mackenzie.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

The Mackenzie Woodlands Safety Committee would like to share some key learnings/messages from this incident:

  1. Do not assume that work done on a vehicle has been completed properly, regardless of the service centre. Immediately check any unusual vehicle behaviour, especially if it occurs shortly after a vehicle service.
  2. Inform the service centre so they can put procedures in place to avoid future occurrences.
  3. ALWAYS re-torque your wheels after having work done which necessitates their removal. Do not necessarily wait for the recommended 100 km’s to have this done.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Dan Szekely – Operations Coordinator

File attachments
2008-01-17 Loose Lug Nuts.pdf

Worksite Bulletins

Safety Alert Type: 
Worksites
Location: 
Blackwater Spruce Road
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-02-05
Company Name: 
Westroad Resource Consultants Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Crew was timber cruising in a dead IBM attacked stand during moderate to high winds. While collecting data at a plot, a gust of wind knock over a tree. The falling tree got hung up in another tree before reaching the ground but it was directly above the workers heads. The wind remained strong and the crew felt it was unsafe to continue working in the area so they returned home.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Do not work in a dead IBM attacked stands if there are strong winds in the area. The level of risk from the wind should be determined in the office before heading out to the field or during the worksite hazard assessment. Wear hard-hats on winder days.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Jim Kurta
Westroad Resource Consultants Ltd.
Quesnel, B.C.
250-992-2987

File attachments
2008-02-05 High Winds Bring Down trees.pdf

Worker Bulletins

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-05-01
Company Name: 
WorkSafeBC
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

This major amendment to the health and safety regulation for forestry is focused on reducing the high number of serious injuries and fatalities in the sector.

The regulation was reorganized, and major changes were made, relating to:

  1. Prime Contractor: Making the requirement for having a qualified prime contractor on multi-employer sites clearer and more detailed (section 26.1.1);
  2. Planning: Stepping up the requirements related to “planning and conducting” (section 26.2);
  3. Equipment Operations: Introducing specific requirements identifying hazards and safe work areas around equipment (section 26.14.1);
  4. Manual Falling and Bucking: Making the requirement to have a qualified supervisor for hand fallers more specific and detailed (section 26.22.1);
  5. Hauling: Logbook requirements for log haulers (section 26.71.2), and changes regarding climbing on bunks and trailers.

Find out more here.

File attachments
2008-05-01 Worker Bulletins.pdf

Worksite Bulletins

Safety Alert Type: 
Worksites
Location: 
BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-02-01
Company Name: 
WorkSafeBC
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

WorkSafeBC has changed the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation. They have introduced:

  • new hazard assessment and air evacuation requirements for isolated workers;
  • specific first aid personnel and equipment requirements;
  • requirements for plans to minimize exposure when workers face chemical or biological hazards, and
  • rules around safe use of work platforms.

Many of these changes come about directly as a result of incidents and investigations related to the forest industry, and will affect forest operations’ safety activities.

Find out more here.

File attachments
2008-02-01 Bulletin Issued.pdf

Worker Bulletins

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
Okanagan / general
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-01
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Raised as a potential hazard during a regular safety meeting. Once it was raised, a number of individuals mentioned previous experiences with the high pressure flow of water through culverts that have just been opened.

During high run off and the combination of  plugged culverts the force that water flows through culverts once the opening has been cleared can be immense. Individuals cleaning out the mouth of the culverts must be extra cautious and ensure that they are in a secure spot before removing debris.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Ensure that you have a secure and safe spot for your feet when cleaning out debris. It might be stating the obvious, but do not stand in the water at the mouth of the culvert while removing the blockage and/or debris.

File attachments
2008-01-01 Culvets High Risk To Personal Safety.pdf

Worker Bulletins

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
Kootenays
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-01
Company Name: 
WorkSafeBC
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A skidder operator was killed when his skidder rolled over and crushed him. When the skidder started to roll down the steep slope, the operator was ejected from the cab into the path of the rolling skidder. The seat belts in the skidder were not used because part of the belt was missing.

The cab, with its rollover structure in place, survived the rollover with minimal damage. Indications are that the operator would have had a good chance of surviving the rollover if he had been safely buckled up within the protective structure of his cab.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Seat belts must be maintained in good working order.
  • Equipment operators must buckle up whenever the equipment they are operating is in motion, or if movement of the equipment would cause it to become unstable.

 

File attachments
2008-01-01 Skidder Rolls Over Killing Operator.pdf

Other Alerts

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
Bonanza Lake (Beaver Cove Camp Facility)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-06-10
Company Name: 
Ted Leroy Trucking Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

At approximately 8:30pm on Tuesday, June 10, 2008 a worker who suffers from allergic reactions initiated by certain foods, specifically nuts, contacted the First Aid Attendant for medical aid. He was experiencing a severe reaction from a cookie he had eaten earlier in the evening containing nuts.

The worker, who had experienced this type of reaction in the past as told to the First Aid Attendant, did not have any medication with him in camp for immediate consumption in the event of a reaction.

The outcome of this incident was catastrophic.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

All workers should effectively communicate to there Supervisor and or First Aid Attendant any impairment they may have or acquire. This information is to be kept in strict confidence between the First Aid Attendant and their Supervisor.

All workers must ensure they take all reasonable care to protect themselves in the event of an allergic reaction, making certain they carry the appropriate medication applicable to their conditions.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Jim Vaux or Leanne Plester
Safety & Compliance Department
Ted Leroy Trucking Ltd

File attachments
2008-06-10 Allergic reactions.pdf

Other Alerts

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
Avalon Dryland Sort
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-06-14
Company Name: 
C.N. Danroth Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 
  • Pieces of bundle wire shot into the thigh of a Strapper when he was re-cutting wire.
  • Strapper had thrown 3/8 inch bundling wire over a bundle of logs.
  • The hydraulic crimper had not been cutting properly or making clean cuts.
  • The Strapper wanted to cut the frayed ends off and attempted to cut about 2 inches off the fanned out end of the wire.
  • The frayed ends exploded into the workers thigh.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • When cutting short pieces of wire or frayed ends make sure it is at least 5 inches up the strand of wire from the original cut end.
  • Ensure the wire is held secure.
  • Ensure crimper bits are in good working order.
  • Ensure the crimper is held in the proper position.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 
File attachments
2008-06-14 Other Alerts.pdf
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