HAZARD ALERT

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-12-17
Company Name: 
Buckley House Holdings Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A lowbed driver had attached a belt to the pin holding the trailer hitch onto the truck. This was apparently done so he did not have to reach in when pulling the pin to disconnect. The belt was fairly long and hung out from the hitch.

The lowbed was moving a D6 Cat and due to slippery road conditions the driver put his chains on. As the truck was proceeding down the road one of the chains caught the belt and pulled the pin out of the hitch. This caused the trailer to detached from the truck. The trailer started sliding backwards down a hill pulling the truck with it.
Fortunately the driver was able to stop the truck with minimal damage, he then hooked up and proceeded.

This could have been a very serious incident. This alert is to advise all drivers to inspect their trucks regularly and identify potential hazards. Also it is recommending not to add anything on to equipment.

Let all continue to work and drive safe.

File attachments
2007-12-17 Modifcation to Equipment Leads to Crash.pdf

HAZARD ALERT

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-12-11
Company Name: 
GRANT CONLON TRUCKING LTD.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A loaded log truck was traveling on Highway 16 through the Village of Burns Lake when it became involved in an incident with a car. Fortunately there were no serious injuries to either driver but damage was sustained to both vehicles.

The driver of the log truck, observing traffic congestion at the intersection of Highway 16 and Highway 35, had already slowed to below the speed limit. When he saw the car attempt to cross the highway, the driver of the log truck applied his brakes only to have his trailer slide. The log truck driver tried to slow his truck and trailer while at the same time keeping his rig straight. The driver of the car continued her attempt and impacted the log truck in the area of the drivers’ side front tire.

Winter road conditions are in effect and drivers should be prepared for anything but can only be held responsible for their own actions. Other drivers need to be made aware of the distance it takes for a loaded log truck to stop safely.

File attachments
2007-12-11 Collision Between Log Truck and Car.pdf

Climber nearly killed as a result of faulty equipment (pdf)

Location: 
Ridge main
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-11
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A forestry climber was nearly killed as a result of equipment failure. He was at a height of 170' when he transferred from the tree he topped to another tree using his second flip line. While transferring weight from first strap to the second, the first strap failed and the climber swung into the tree he was going to. The climber had just climbed 170' on the faulty strap and it was only blind luck the strap failed while he was tied in with his other strap.
After close inspection and a detailed investigation the failed strap proved to have been improperly repaired. Even though the strap was taken to a certified place of business, the business produced an inferior product. They crimped the steel cable then crimped the nylon sheath behind the first crimp creating a stress point. The stress point between the two crimps is where the cable failed. They should have crimped the sheath over the first crimp, or used a flemish eye on the cable then crimped the sheath locking the flemish eye in place. The company is in the process of recalling all altered or repaired climbing straps as a safety precaution.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Any climber with altered climbing straps needs to complete a thorough safety check of the steel cable at the new termination point. If unsure, or if you have any questions regarding the safety of your climbing straps, remove them from service until you can acquire proper qualified assistance.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kevin Healey 250-710-7075

File attachments
alerts-07-11-04-rope.pdf

Crew cab forced onto shoulder by car

Location: 
Highway 3, 5 km west of Salmo, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-05-25
Company Name: 
Wildhorse Silviculture Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Crew cab driver signaled to make left turn off highway into Beaumont Timber yard.
Driver slowed down, checked mirrors for traffic approaching from behind. Observed small
car approaching very fast, it then pulled out & passed on solid line forcing crew cab onto
right shoulder. Driver had done a pre-trip inspection including a check of brake & signal
lights. All had been in good working order. Once driver had safely entered timber yard,
lights were checked again but were found to be still in good working order.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Since transportation crashes while commuting to & from work are potentially a major
source of serious & fatal injuries in the silviculture industry, recommended preventative
actions include:
- pre-trip inspections, including a check of turn signals, headlights & brake lights,
plus mirrors correctly positioned for driver
- drivers have appropriate licenses & driving experience
- passengers wear seatbelts at all times
- extra caution should be taken by drivers during early morning commutes when
other drivers may not be alert or are driving at excessive speeds

File attachments
2007-05-25 crew forced onto shoulder by car.pdf

HAZARD ALERT

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-15
Company Name: 
PINE RIDGE HOLDINGS LTD
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A loaded log truck operated by Grant Conlon Trucking Ltd., a sub-contractor of Pine Ridge Holdings Ltd., was traveling on a logging road when it met an unloaded log truck, operating for another contractor. The unloaded log truck had gone past the pullout when the trucks met. Both log trucks managed to stop and were in no danger colliding but the road was very slippery at the time and the potential was there for a severe incident. The trailer of the loaded log truck slid off the road causing the live front bunk to trip off, spilling the load.Little damage was caused to the equipment but the road was blocked. The drivers called to advise any other traffic of the situation, a loader was called in to pull the trailer out of the ditch. Traffic was then moving again.The loaded log truck had called 10 km but was unsure if he had called 9 km. The unloaded log truck missed the call but other witnesses had heard the call. This close call was caused by a momentary lack of attention and it was fortunate that it was not of a more serious nature. A suggestion was made to attach high visibility tape on the mile boards to catch the attention of drivers and perhaps refocus their attention on truck locations.

File attachments
2007-11-15 Icy Conditions Result in Close Call.pdf

Faller injured while bucking

Location: 
Cowichan (L-Line)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-23
Company Name: 
Ted LeRoy Trucking Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A faller was bucking the root off a blown down fir tree when the root wad, which was partially attached, rolled from its original resting place down the slope increasing the load energy on the tree. When the cut was completed the top portion of the tree kicked back striking the fallers left lower leg pinning him and fracturing his leg.
Faller misjudged the hazard of the loaded stem and the potential for the energy to increase with the root wad moving down hill.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Eliminate loaded hazards by bucking at pivot points.
2. Faller positioning, ensure safe position prior to making any cuts.
3. Where pivot points or hazards can't be removed do not attempt any bucking
4. Ensure this incident is reviewed with all fallers and documented

File attachments
alerts-07-12-25.pdf

Vehicles & Roads

Location: 
BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-07-10
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

It’s no news that fuel prices have gone through the roof. That’s creating all sorts of problems for people. Don’t add being caught with an empty tank - it can put your safety at risk.

What’s Happening

As fuel prices have hit historic highs, two things are happening:

First, some people are buying “just enough” to get them through the day, or through the job. That’s a good idea…except when something unexpected happens and “just enough” turns into “not quite enough”.

Second, fuel thieves are showing up in all sorts of places:

  • At overnight truck stops;
  • At long-term parking lots;
  • At work sites where equipment is parked;
  • In the forest, where logging and other equipment sits unattended overnight or over weekends;
  • In work yards where there’s an above-ground fuel storage tank and almost anywhere else there’s a tank and an opportunity to tap into it.

It’s bad enough to lose tens or hundreds of dollars of fuel, not to mention the time it takes to get new supplies in. Even worse is the possibility of your vehicles running dry in the middle of the day, when you don’t have any way to get help.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Take sensible precautions to prevent fuel theft:
  • Get a locking gas cap, or other locking system;
  • Secure your yard fuel supplies
  • Fill up in the morning before work, rather than the night before.
  • Pay attention to fuel on your pre-trip or pre-work inspections. Look at the gauge or measure the tank levels.
  • Don’t leave temptation for thieves. Properly store and secure extra fuel supplies on site or with your vehicle.
  • If you’re taking a “just enough” approach to filling your tank, leave a margin of error for unexpected delays or other requirements. You’ll be glad you did.
  • Make sure you’re using your man-check system, in case your best laid plans don’t
  • work out and you end up somewhere without fuel.

Finally, if you have an experience with fuel theft, report it to your local police. They won’t know there’s a problem if no one tells them, and once they know there is a problem they can take action.

 

File attachments
2008-07-10 Gas Thiefs.pdf

Vehicles & Roads

Location: 
BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-05-30
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Resource road users are facing an overlap of silviculture activities and log harvesting activities due to a late spring start. This means that the tree planters are still very active in the forests while the loggers are getting started on their summer hauling season. Add to this the arrival of recreational users on those same roads and awareness and caution is required from everyone.

Be Aware!

This alert is to remind all loggers, whether harvesting crews, support services, or log haulers, that the tree planters will be on the logging roads with you. Be mindful that that these drivers are often young, inexperienced in resource road driving, new to the area, and sharing the road with trucks. Guide your actions accordingly, and expect the unexpected.

To the tree planting and silviculture crews, log trucks are starting to haul in various areas of the province. You need to be aware that you are always sharing the road.

And to all forest industry road users, a reminder that it is also tourist season. Please be an example to non-industry users about sharing the road.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Remember the simple rules of the road, wherever and whoever you are:

  1. Wear your seatbelt! Whether you are driving a pickup or a loaded log truck wearing your seatbelt dramatically reduces your chance of being killed or injured if you are involved in an accident
  2. Loaded trucks have the right of way; you must clear them
  3. Stay on your own side of the road
  4. Observe posted speed limits. In the absence of a posted speed, the default is 70 kms per hour.
  5. Obey all traffic control signs
  6. Make sure you are on the right radio frequency at all times
  7. Call your kilometres according to the rules on that road
  8. Keep your headlights and taillights clean and on at all times
  9. Do not pass a logging truck unless it gives you a signal that it’s safe to do so (radio communication, flashes lights, etc)

These rules of the road are not mere suggestions – they are, in fact, regulations from WorkSafeBC, the Motor Vehicle Act, the Forest and Range Act, and as such, are ticketable offences.

File attachments
2008-05-30 Share the roads.pdf

Vehicles & Roads

Location: 
Princeton
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-03-27
Company Name: 
Weyerhaeuser
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A contractor recently observed several oncoming loaded log trucks along the highway with logs sticking out behind the rear stake. He later had his own loader operator recreate what he had witnessed for this safety alert. This situation creates an over-width load and could potentially cause a collision with oncoming traffic when maneuvering tight corners on the highway.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

The loader operator and the truck driver both have a responsibility to identify loads that are not safe and that could result in an upset condition while being loaded or transported.

Loader operators and truck drivers must ensure that all logs are adequately contained and stable within the bunks and that there are no protruding logs or branches.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Peter Forbes, RPF
Logging Supervisor
Weyerhaeuser
(250) 295-4294

File attachments
2008-03-27 Over-width Load.pdf

Vehicles & Roads

Location: 
Prince George Woodlands
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-02-19
Company Name: 
Canfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

During the past few weeks I have received a number of complaints/concerns passed onto me from various road users. In addition, I have noticed a number of marking in the ditches where logging trucks and/or pickups have had to hit the ditch to avoid collisions. These markings in the ditch represent close calls that could have easily resulted in collisions and injuries on our logging roads.

There are approximately 30 days left in the W2008 season and I would like to communicate some key logging road safety reminders that can help us successfully complete the winter haul season.

1. All road users need to continue to follow radio call procedures.

  • Loaded traffic calls all even kms (except for Lakeland 200 where users call all odd kms).
  • Empty traffic calls all posted “Call Empty” signs.
  • Call empty when entering a new road.

2. During the past month an increase in the amount of “Both Ways Calling” is occurring on the logging roads. In a number of circumstances, I have heard loaded logging trucks calling both ways for empty logging trucks. This radio call practice creates unnecessary radio clutter on the logging roads and can lead to accidents. Both ways calling should be reserved for the following:

  • Notifying other road users of vehicles who don’t have radios.
  • Notifying other road users of vehicles who are traveling dangerously or at a high rate of high speed
  • Notifying other road users of road maintenance equipment working.

3. Clearing on Logging Roads – I continue to hear complaints regarding the poor clearing practices of some empty traffic on our logging roads. The main complaints I am getting is that empties are clearing in poor locations, empties are not slowing down for loaded traffic, and empty log trucks are pushing for next pullout instead of taking the first pullout available.
Below are the expectations for clearing on the major mainline type haul roads in Prince George (Lakeland 200Rd, Polar 200 RD, Pelican FSR):

  • Due to the wide nature of these mainlines, it is acceptable in most circumstances to clear loaded traffic by slowing down and creeping along edge of the road. Empty traffic should follow the following simple rules for clearing loaded traffic:
    • Clear at slow rates speed (maximum 10 km/hr).
    • Clear on straight sections of road that have good lines of sight. This will allow the loaded traffic time to adjust their speed and safely clear the empty traffic. Empties should never clear on corners, hills, or narrow section of roads.
    • Avoid clearing on the fly during adverse road or weather conditions. Utilize pullouts in these circumstances.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Neil Spendiff – Woodlands Safety Coordinator

File attachments
2008-02-19 Reminder About Close Calls.pdf
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