2007-07-13 Hoist Cable Breaks

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Sawmill yard
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-03
Company Name: 
Tolko Industries Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Logging truck driver was attempting to re-load his trailer at the reload station and the hoist cable broke, dropping the trailer ~4 ft. to the ground. Driver was not injured but trailer suffered some damage, including a broken reach chain. The hoist cable was rated for 10,000kg and the trailer weighs 7,200kg. Hoist is inspected annually.

After the cable broke, he obtained assistance lifting the reach from on-site equipment operators and used a tarp tie-down strap to hold up the reach. While attempting to secure the trailer for a re-load by a log yard loader, the driver was struck on the head and shoulder when the tie-down strap failed and the reach fell. The driver was knocked to the ground. The driver was wearing all required PPE. He sustained minor head and neck injuries in the incident.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

- Daily and weekly inspection process for cable at reload station to be implemented.
- Review incident with all truck drivers (include coaching on use of proper fastening mechanisms - i.e. chain vs. tie-down strap)
- Post signs saying, “Inspect lift equipment before use”.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Tolko Industries Ltd., Okanagan Woodlands

Mark Tamas, Regional Woodlands Manager
(250) 260-1208

File attachments
2007-07-13 Hoist Cable Breaks.pdf

Re-torque of Lug Nuts after Tire Changes

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Northwood Pulpmill Road
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-17
Company Name: 
Canfor Woodlands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On August 17, 2007 a Canfor Pickup was being driven home on the Northwood Pulpmill Road. As the employee was driving the rear driver’s side tire came off the truck. The lost tire continued down the road, rolling into the oncoming traffic lane for approximately 100m then ended up crossing the road and bouncing into the ditch. Luckily no other accidents occurred has a result of the tire rolling into oncoming traffic.

The tire had been changed approximately 3 weeks prior (roughly 2000-3000km since the tire change). The lug nuts had not been re-torqued at any time since the initial tire change.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

After further investigation and discussions with local tire shops, the following actions have been instituted to prevent a reoccurrence in the future:
1.Reinforce with all staff the standard tire shop policy that all vehicles must heve lug nuts re-torqued within 150km after any tire change made at a tire shop.
2.Canfor PG Woodlands has instituted a policy that employees must retorque lug nuts within 25 km of any tire change that has been completed by employees in the bush or on the highway.
3.Reinforce the need for all Woodlands Staff to immediately take their vehicle into the automotive repair shop if vibrations cannot be fixed by retorqueing.

File attachments
2007-08-17 Re-torque of Lug Nuts after Tire Changes.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Quesnel
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-21
Company Name: 
Jordef Enterprises Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Logging truck driver was injured as a result of falling off trailer tire as he was attempting to remove protruding branches from loaded truck. He sustained a cracked hip bone and will be off work for several months.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1.Before leaving log loader the truck driver should ensure that there are not any branches or logs protruding from the load.
2.If there are any branches or logs protruding from the load, the log loader should be directed to remove them.

File attachments
2007-08-21 serious injury results from fall.pdf

Safety Hazard Alert

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-08
Company Name: 
BURKE PURDON ENTERPRISES LTD.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

While attempting to adjust the radio, a driver was distracted enough that he let the truck drift to the shoulder of the road. Although he corrected the truck, the trailer tracked into the ditch. This caused both units to flop on to their sides. Fortunately the driver was going slow when this happened and was wearing his seatbelt. It is probably these two reasons he was not injured.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

As professional drivers, do not let anything distract you from your duties. It is not safe to focus on activities that are not related to driving. Looking for lost objects in the cab, eating, talking on the phone, etc. are all activities that distract your attention. Please stop the truck if you can not focus on driving.

Hauling logs is a dangerous job. Respect it, don’t let it kill you.
Wear your seatbelt, slow down, and live to tell about it.

File attachments
2007-09-08 Undue Care Causes Truck To Roll onto Side.pdf

Checklist 16-1

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Seaward (tlasta) Business Area - Port McNeill Timber Sales Office
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-06
Company Name: 
BC Timber Sales
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A Timber Sales Licensee recently experienced a logging truck rollover relating to a road segment exceeding 18% which was not risk assessed as per the WorkSafeBC OHS Guideline 26.2-2 “Planning log hauling operations for varying road grades”. The Licensee was not aware of the requirement under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation to conduct a risk assessment on road grades exceeding 18%.

WorkSafe BC voiced concern that Licensees were not aware of the location of road segments exceeding 18% gradient, or of the WorkSafe requirement to conduct a risk assessment on these road segments. WorkSafe also advised that these guidelines are not being applied uniformly by Timber Sales Licensees, and therefore posed an ongoing safety hazard provincially.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Seaward (tlasta) Business Area as the first owner will make known those segments of road designed and/or built to exceed 18% gradient to respective Timber Sale Licence bidders.
Seaward (tlasta) Business Area recommends that the Forest Safety Council send out a safety bulletin to its members reminding them of:

G26.2-2 Planning log hauling operations for varying road grades
Issued: September 28, 2005
OHS Guidelines Part 26 Forestry Operations
The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC) has developed descent guidelines for several operating conditions:
Development of guidelines for descending steep grades: British Columbia coastal off-highway truck applications FPInnovations - FERIC Division

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Glenn Piggot, Area Forester
Port McNeill Timber Sales Office
(250) 956-5106

File attachments
2007-09-06 Checklist 16-1.pdf

NEAR MISS

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-20
Company Name: 
AMBOY LOGGING LTD
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A pickup was travelling on a controlled road towards the job site. Suddenly it was confronted by a loaded log truck on the road coming towards it. The pickup had to swerve into the ditch/bush.
Neither the log truck driver nor the driver of the pickup were calling their kilometres. The weather conditions were less that ideal. It was raining and the clay ground was very slippery.
Luckily, no injury or damage occurred, but the incident could have resulted in serious injuries.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Always call your kilometres when driving on a controlled road. Both drivers should have adjusted their speed and awareness to compensate for the weather conditions. The driver of the pickup should be noting wider areas of the road where he can pull over to let the logging trucks by.

File attachments
2007-08-20 Near miss between pickup na dloaded logging truck.pdf

Buckerman Injured while working near log deck

Location: 
BC Southern Interior
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2006-12-01
Company Name: 
H.A. Friedenberger Contracting Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A buckerman was injured while bucking down slope from manufactured logs that were being decked on the high side of a small road right‐of‐way landing. An ice covered hemlock log that was over 49’ in length slid off the log deck while the loader operator was positioning it in the deck.
The buckerman saw the log approaching in his direction, so he ran and fell, twisting his knee. The loader operator grabbed the moving hemlock log with the grapple of his loader. This action stopped the log from sliding toward the buckerman, avoiding further injury to him.
The buckerman received medical treatment at the hospital in Nakusp, where it was determined that he had slightly torn ligaments in his right knee. There was no loss of time due to the injury.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Loader operators must ensure all workers are in the clear before decking logs / trees.
• Avoid constructing / utilizing log decks located on the high side of confined landings. Logs should be decked on the low side of confined landings.
• Logs should be decked at a height that will not compromise the stability of the logs being decked. Plan to have logs loaded and hauled by logging trucks before the decked logs’ height becomes a safety concern.
• Proceed with increased caution when handling ice covered logs.

File attachments
alerts-07-07-11-buckerman_injury.pdf

Buckerman Injured on Landing

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-01
Company Name: 
H.A. Friedenberger Contracting Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A buckerman was injured while walking to buck a turn of logs set out on a small landing located near a cable yarder setting.
As the buckerman was approaching the turn on the landing from his “safe area”, he tripped on some cedar branches that were covering a small depression. The buckerman experienced pain in his upper left leg.
The buckerman received medical treatment at the hospital in Nakusp, where it was determined that he had pulled a groin muscle in his left leg. There was lost time due to the injury.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Landings should be constructed level, free of depressions / mounds, and any other tripping hazards.
2. Slash and debris on landings should be cleared at a frequency as to not allow slash and debris to interfere with a
person’s safe access / egress while working on the landing.
3. Persons walking on landings should ensure good footing while doing so.

File attachments
alerts-07-09-01-buckerman.pdf

FOREST INDUSTRY SAFETY ALERT

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Meickle Creek Road
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-22
Company Name: 
Northwind Logging Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Mechanic was helping Low-bed driver attach cinches and chains to a load. While in the process of tightening a cinch, the handle broke off causing the mechanic to fall back. The sudden twist caused a minor sprain to his ankle, but could have been much worse.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

All truck drivers and others using cinches should inspect them periodically for cracks or flaws to help avoid this type of failure.

File attachments
2007-08-22 Broken handle leads to fall.pdf

Do Not Fall Trees Uphill on Steep Slopes

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-03-03
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A worker was falling a fir uphill on a 50 percent slope. The 175-foot fir had a sweep ("hockey
stick") at the butt and was leaning heavily uphill. As the fir fell, it struck two previously felled
trees and broke in two pieces. The butt end rolled to one side and slid down the slope. It hit the
faller as he exited along his escape route. He was dragged 28 feet downhill, sustaining serious
injuries.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Do not fall trees uphill on steep slopes. Limit the direction of fall to a maximum upslope
angle of 15 degrees off level.
• Discuss falling difficulties with your supervisor/bullbucker or falling partner.
• Consider alternative methods if the tree must be removed uphill on a steep slope.
• Recognize that a tree with an unusual shape may not fall in the intended direction.
• Brush out your escape route and plan an alternative route in case the tree does not fall
as intended.

File attachments
alerts-07-03-03-falling_slopes.pdf
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