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Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Race Point Dry Land Sort
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-12-12
Company Name: 
Ted LeRoy Trucking Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Near Mishap:
A log loader on a dry land sort was sorting logs and while doing so the cab tilt motor engaged causing the cab to start tilting forward. The cab proceeded to lift to the half way point then stopped. Upon investigating the incident it was discovered that one of the cab lockdown bolts was broken and the remaining bolt snapped off under pressure. The investigation revealed the wiring harness at the cab tilt switch had shorted out causing the cab tilt motor to engage.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1) Ensure this incident is reviewed with the manufacturer (wire harness cab switch engineering for possible update of design).
2) Operators to ensure cab lockdown bolts are tight and secure
3) There will be an addition to the mechanics service check sheet to ensure cab lockdown bolts are in place during service intervals.
4) This incident reinforces the importance of preventative maintenance. Please review this close call with all operators

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Ted LeRoy Trucking Ltd.
Safety and Compliance Department
Jim Vaux or Shawn Munson
(250) 246-2880

File attachments
2007-12-12 Broken Bolt Results in Close Call.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Lumby, B.C
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-23
Company Name: 
R.J. Schunter Contracting Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A skidder operator was on a slope of 5% with a heavy drag, when the tire went over a stump. The drag pushed the skidder over onto its side.
The operator was wearing his seat belt and as a result was not injured. There was no damage to the skidder.
There was light snow and lots of debris on the ground, which may have contributed to the incident.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Make sure all obstacles are clear from skidder path.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

R.J. Schunter Contracting Ltd

File attachments
2007-11-23 Tire Hits Stump Resulting in Close Call.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Tolko license area, approximately 120 km Northwest of Williams Lake
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-20
Company Name: 
Ken Ilnicki Developments Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Roadside decking of trees was being conducted by a grapple loader in conjunction with a 648 grapple skidder. The skidder operator was pulling drags of trees to the loader to be piled, with the intent of maximizing available roadside workspace.

One of the drags that were grabbed by the skidderman contained a tree that was pointed in the opposite direction from the rest of the drag. This tree was also situated such that it was not lying parallel with the rest of the drag, but rather was sticking up out of the pile at a 45-degree angle. The tree was too small to be merchantable and was likely pushed over by the buncher operator.

Weather conditions at the time were sunny skies. The skidderman was in a position where the sun was in his face as he was looking through the rear window backing the skidder up to the drag. The bright sun and high angle of the tree caused a visual impairment to the operator. Unaware of the tree protruding out, he pulled the drag towards the loader. The tree easily went between the protective metal guarding over the loader window and penetrated the window at head level, narrowly missing the operator. The loaderman tried turning the cab of the loader at the last minute when he saw the tree coming at him but was unsuccessful. He sustained no injuries, but had broken glass on his body and in his mouth. Both machines were radio equipped.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Loader operator shall place the machine in a position off to the side, where it is not directly in line with the skidding phase.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Benjamin R. Korving, RPF
Company Forester
Ken Ilnicki Developments Ltd.
korvings@telus.net

File attachments
2007-11-20 Visual Impairment Causes Near Miss.pdf

Supervisor Fatality

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
Kingcome TSA
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-02-03
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A supervisor for a road construction contractor was killed during preparations for blasting
in a quarry. Following an initial safety meeting and preparatory work to clear hazards, a
crew prepared the site for blasting.
At that point, a 29 inch diameter by 107 feet tall cedar tree, located on a steep slope 85
feet above the quarry, blew over. Two of three people on the crew escaped the falling
tree, but the supervisor was struck and killed beside the front wheel of the drill.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

While the details of this incident are under investigation, it brings into sharp focus the
need for ongoing site and hazard assessment throughout the shift, particularly when
working for long periods within a limited site such as a quarry, and the need for all
workers (especially ground workers) to pre-plan escape routes for if and when a
controlled hazard becomes uncontrolled.

File attachments
2007-02-03 Supervisor Fatality.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
West of Bear Lake on 3400 rd area BLK 254-002.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-06
Company Name: 
North Aspect Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

An employee of North Aspect Contracting was walking on a cut block and heard a growling nearby at the timber boundary. She witnessed a cougar traveling about 200m away along the boundary. She then noticed a deer running into the adjacent cut block as she was backing away. The cougar was hunting the deer. The employee contacted another employee working in the area by radio and they both left the block.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Always stay alert and attentive in your work environment. Look for signs that may prevent dangerous encounters with wildlife. Always have radio communication with work partner.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Nick Hawes 250-562-3835

File attachments
2007-07-06 Cose Call With Cougar.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
North White River, east of Canal Flats, B.C.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-04
Company Name: 
Maple Leaf Forestry Consulting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Two forestry workers conducting a stream assessment for timber development encountered a Grizzly Bear. The workers were approximately 40 meters apart when one the workers startled the bear. The bear then ran towards the other worker. Noting this, the worker quickly dove under a windfall for protection. The bear attempted to pull the worker out from under the windfall severely injuring his right leg and right arm. The worker was able to adjust himself squarely to the bear and kicked the bear directly in the face with his caulked boot. The bear then retreated and ran back towards the other worker. The other worker was aware the bear was approaching and was prepared to defend herself with Bear Spray. As the bear quickly approached she sprayed the bear with her spray and it instantly withdrew and retreated to the forest not to be seen again.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Make plenty of noise when working the bush whether you are alone or in pairs. Carry Bear Spray at all times when you’re in the bush. Wear Bear bells on your cruisers vest or backpack. Be Bear aware, look for the signs and make wise decisions.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Mark Serediuk, General Manager of Maple Leaf Forestry Consulting Ltd. (250) 489-0005.

File attachments
2007-07-04 Worker Encounters Grizzly Bear.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
1.4Km Blind Creek Main, Knights Inlet
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-05
Company Name: 
Marine Pacific Engineering Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Early in the day on the first day of a shift a grizzly bear tracked and followed an engineering crewman for about 20 minutes. The bear left sign (scat and alder scrapes) and the area smelled strongly of bear. The bear appeared to lose interest and the crewman thought he had left but instead the bear had gone ahead to a break in a rock bluff. From this crux he charged directly at the crewman, knocking down alder trees in the charge. About ten meters away from the crewman, the bear suddenly, and without any obvious reason, changed directions and ran down the hill away from the crewman. This was the first of many bear sighting and encounters over a four day shift.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1.Avoid known bear areas when bears are highly active and aggressive (summer/early fall).
2.Work in pairs when bears are an identified hazard.
3.Arm yourself.
4.Be alert and aware in grizzly country. Make Noise - don’t startle creatures.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Jamie Alguire (250) 923-4023

File attachments
2007-07-05 Grizzly Bear follows crewman.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
Phinette Lake, off of Highway 24, Southern Interior Forest District
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-19
Company Name: 
Montane Forest Consultants Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Forestry worker was working in the Phinette Lake area laying out a Forestry road. Cougar approached to within 3m, predatory to forestry worker and his dog. Worker faced the cougar and backed towards the truck approx 200m away. Cougar followed worker to truck and worker and his dog arrived safely at the truck.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

All safe work procedures were followed as per our Health and Safety Policy.
A ll work in the area ceased operations and workers returned to their office. Ministry of Environment officials were notified.

File attachments
2007-09-19 Close Encounter With Cougar.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
Auger Rd, Burns Lk
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-10
Company Name: 
North Aspect Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Crew was surveying a blk. It was hunting season and we had signs up Alerting people “Crew Working In Area”. At the end of the day the crew got in the truck to drive home, only to find the Rd had been de-activated. It took hours placing logs and wood to get through the de-activations. The vehicle also sustained damage.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Place sign at the beginning of secondary Rd where it joins main line. It is also the responsibility of the de-activation crew to drive to the END of the Rd being de-activated. If this had of been practiced, the situation could have been avoided. MOFR Burns Lake was informed of the incident, for investigation.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Nick Hawes 250-562-3835

File attachments
2007-10-10 De-Activated Road Causes Problems.pdf

Close Call Black Bear Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
Yeo Island, Mapsheet # 103A050-013, UTM Grid 9-5806-5600, Blk Y13. BCTS TSL A71396 is located approximately 125km west of Bella Coola and 15km north of Bella Bella. The log dump is located on the SW point of Yeo Island on Spiller Channel. Proceed 16km up the Yeo mainline to Block Y13.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-14
Company Name: 
Coast Forest Management Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

9:30AM: 2 employees were conducting logging residue and waste surveys within block Y13. The crew accessed the block by helicopter from Shearwater (near Bella Bella). Both employees were working in a plot approximately 35m above the Yeo mainline at mid-block. While working, one of the employees turned and saw an extremely large black bear within 3+/- meters of himself and within 1-2+/- meters of his working partner. Both employees started yelling in an attempt to scare-off the bear. At this point, the bear realized he was very close to one of the employees and began to advance toward him. Both continued to yell but the bear kept advancing. One employee began to move uphill of the bear in an attempt to get clear but the bear continued to pursue him. The other employee moved downhill and continued to yell. This seemed to confuse the bear a little and both employees were able to put some distance between themselves and the bear. They both reached the mainline and noticed the bear had moved downhill to the road ahead of them to try to cut them off. One employee had left his vest at plot center which had the radio in the back pouch. Fortunately, there was another residue and waste crew working in the same block so the two employees began to walk/run towards the other crew. The second crew had a radio and called out on Marine 6 to relay a message to the helicopter pilot at Shearwater. At this time, all crew noticed the bear was walking up the road, advancing towards them so they all began walking/running down the mainline in a southerly direction. The bear continued to advance and followed them approximately 2km down the mainline. The crew continued to walk down the mainline and was eventually picked-up by helicopter 4km from Y13 at 11:00AM. The bear was not sighted at 4km.
The conservation officer was notified Monday, October 15th of the incidence and informed the crew (ordered) to stay out of the area until further notice.
It appears that the logging crew had several encounters with a very aggressive black bear while working in the same vicinity during logging operations (although not documented).

Learnings and Suggestions: 

-Alert any potential future forestry / recreation personnel of bear incidence.
-Contact conservation officer in Bella Bella for any updates or follow-up information to this incidence.
-Always work in pairs.
-Be aware of high risk areas.
-Be bear aware and always look for sign.
-Always carry bear spray, bells, bangers.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Dave Riddell, Coast Forest Management Ltd, Campbell River, BC @ 250-287-2077

File attachments
2007-10-14 Close Call With Black Bear.pdf
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