Worker Lost Overnight

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
Plumper Harbor ect.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-12-08
Company Name: 
Golden Spruce ventures Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On the afternoon of the 8th day of December, 2007 at 2:30 pm. a worker in the occupation of tree topping became lost as he wandered away from his crew working on Nootka Island on the west coast of Vancouver Island.
The worker failed to inform his crew of his intentions to desert his station and as such neither his supervisor nor co-worker knew of his whereabouts, this junior crew member in a somewhat distraught frame of mind found himself in unfamiliar territory.
Due to poor planning, no map preparation or radio maintenance and in contravention of mandatory communication, this climber was unable to reverse what had for him become a sequence of events leading to a crisis. The worker ran out of daylight and with it his chances to reverse any of those events.
His only hope at this point was to abandon hope of return and stay the night in the trees. Search and rescue was called, the worker was not injured and he walked out of the trees to safety when it became daylight.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kevin Beausoleil (250) 850-1521

Employee released brake on scow winch line and spoke of winch wheel struck employees finger breaking finger

Safety Alert Type: 
Manufacturing
Location: 
Duke Point Sawmill
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-02-02
Company Name: 
Western Forest Products
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Employee was in the process of slacking scow shore line (A) and he released the brake (B) of the scow winch. The wheel (C) spun and the wheel spoke hit the employees hand and broke his finger. The spoke on the original wheel that struck the employees finger was replaced with this solid wheel to prevent accident contact as caused this incident

Upset Conditions:
1. Scow was under shore line docking plate and had to be moved to free scow from plate.
2. Inadequate training/instruction for employee in doing this job

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Assess the risks of the task being done to ensure you are in a safe position and following safe procedures to do the job.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Terry Baker 250-714-9310

File attachments
2007-02-02 Released brake leads to broken finger.pdf

Multiple Fracture to Leg

Safety Alert Type: 
Manufacturing
Location: 
Somass Division
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-06-22
Company Name: 
Western Forest Products
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Employee was assisting a millwright and welder in cleaning up the metal storage racks. A maintenance person would remove the metal plates by the use of overhead hoist and plate clamp and the employee would clean the debris in the rack. All three were doing this in between other jobs. About 3:25 pm the welder had called the millwright to come back with service crane to assist them further. At this time the welder had taken a small plate with the fork lift to storage area on the south side of shop. While both trades’ people were away, the cleanup employee removed three checkered metal plates (3/8 x 4 ft x 8 ft) out of the rack by using overhead crane and plate clamp. The metal plates came out of the clamp and fell toward the operator. He tried to step back but fell over the pallet of chains that were behind him. The metal plates landed on his right leg causing multiple fractures to his lower leg.

Upset Conditions:
1.Lack of training
2.Lack of knowledge
3.Congestion
4.Inadequate grip or hold
5.Inadequate awareness of surroundings

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1.Ensure employees are trained and competent in the job tasks they are assigned to perform
2.Use RADAR, assess the risks around your work area, remove congestion if possible
3.Ensure hoist pendants are long enough so operators can stay from danger areas
4.Communicate to all employees that they are not to do job they have not been trained to do.
5.Ensure proper instructions are available to employees on the use of metal clamps such as lift only one plate at a time. Safe lifting procedure

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Randy Sall or Mike Shewchuk

File attachments
2007-06-22 metal plate falls on leg.pdf

BODY CONTACT WITH ROTATING HULA SAW

Safety Alert Type: 
Manufacturing
Location: 
Ladysmith
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-17
Company Name: 
Western Forest Products
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Millwright was called to pony edger to repair an infeed
drive chain. The millwright had all energy sources locked
out, test started, but failed to notice that the hula saw was
still rotating. He entered the rollcase, bent over to view the
drive chain and his right cheek of his buttocks came in
contact with the rotating saw.

Upset Conditions:
1. Drive chain off.
2. Guarding on hula saw was not sufficient.
3. Worker failed to ensure machine was at zero energy.
Saw takes 5 mins. & 35 secs. to come to a stop after
being shut off. After about 2 mins., the rotating saw is
in-audible.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Modify guard on hula saw to extend past the edge of the saw. (completed Aug. 18/07)
2. Label at saw to state that it takes 5 mins. & 35 secs. to come to a stop. (completed Aug. 17/07)
3. Review with all maintenance re: Millwrights, Filers, Electrical & Pony edger operator that this saw coasts for a long period of time after being shut off.
4. Initiate RADAR program .

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Contact Dennis Heck @ 250-245-6458

File attachments
2007-08-17 Body Contact With Rotating Hula Saw.pdf

Labourer Injured by Broken Board

Safety Alert Type: 
Manufacturing
Location: 
BC Southern Interior
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-01
Company Name: 
Harlow Creek Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A labourer was helping adjust the walls of a metal building being constructed – the workers were pushing metal sheets into place by pushing / prying with a 2” x 6” x 16’ hemlock board.

The board was bowed from the action of the workers pushing on it. The board broke into two pieces (at the location of spike knot running across the surface of the board), and one of the pieces sprang back and struck the labourer on the left, front of head.

A qualified Occupational Level One First Aid attendant attended to the labourer on site. The wound was bleeding profusely, so the attendant applied pressure to the wound through and absorbent pad and had the labourer driven to Arrow Lakes hospital to receive further medical treatment. The labourer received 15 staples to close the wound, and the worker did not return to work – the incident is recorded as a lost-time incident.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Persons should use engineered / recommended tools only to push / pry objects into place. Ensure that the tools are maintained, inspected, and tested before using them.
2. Personnel should be instructed in all safe work practices related to their job before the job begins.

File attachments
2007-11-01 Labourer Injured by Broken Board.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Sorting
Location: 
Ferguson Bay Dryland Sort, Queen Charlotte Islands
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-23
Company Name: 
EDWARDS & ASSOCIATES LOGGING LTD
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A boom boat operator was removing loose logs from the “bull pen” after a manual boom cutoff. His boat was pulled in tight under the spillway facing away from the sort. He could hear a stacker approaching the spillway above him with a bundle of logs, and realized that the stacker operator was going to drop the bundle down the spillway. He began waving up to the machine, but was out of the stacker operator’s line of sight, and the bundle was dropped, narrowly missing the boom boat and operator. The boom boat operator promptly left the area.
The boom boat operator had called the sort charge hand when first conducting the boom cutoff, meaning that he would be in the “bull pen” (or area of water directly under the spillways) and this was conveyed to the stacker operators. They stayed clear of the area, and did not push any bundles over the spillways. However, when the boom boat operator returned to the bull pen to sort out some loose logs, there was a breakdown in communications in that it was assumed by one or more of the stacker operators that the boom boat was clear of the area. The sort crew had returned to production as usual. Because of lower tide conditions, the boom boat was not visible to the stacker operator.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Maintain clear communications between the boom boat operator and sort crew at all times
• Boom Boat operator should always notify the charge hand when he is entering or leaving the bullpen
• When the boom boat is in the bull pen area, stacker operators MUST ASSUME that if they cannot see the boat that it is directly under the spillways, and DO NOT push bundles into the water until its location is verified.

For more information on this submitted alert: 
File attachments
2007-07-23 Bundle dropped down spillway narrowly missed boom operator.pdf

Planting Freshly Burned Cutblocks

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-05-29
Company Name: 
Evergreen
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

It is a regular practice for forest companies to burn logged areas prior to planting them. In
some cases these areas are burned in the spring and the window for burning and then planting is quite narrow. There are several hazards that arise after blocks are burned.

First of all, burning tends to destabilize slash and debris that has accumulated on the slopes.
This debris is not always completely burned and what is left behind may have been moved or destabilized by the fire. There is a high potential for this material to move and settle in the
first few weeks after burning. An extra degree of caution should be exercised when moving
through these areas. Planters in particular should pay extra attention when touching or stepping on any slash, logs or rocks as these may move more easily than expected.

Where there’s fire there’s smoke and ash and dust! Freshly burned blocks are nasty places for a tree planter to work. With every step a planter takes, dust and ash is raised into the air. This makes breathing difficult and dangerous. It gets worse when a shovel is plunged into the ground.

Planters should make every effort to plant their trees down wind from where they stand to
minimize the amount of ash and dust they breathe in. We have tried wearing masks to minimize dust intake, but have found this only hinders breathing further due to the amount of exertion inherent in planting.

Ideally foresters should avoid having planters working on freshly burned blocks until significant rain has fallen or the site has had a couple of weeks to cool off and have the ash settle or dissipate. This cooling off period would also help allow the destabilized debris to settle, thus becoming less of a hazard.

File attachments
2007-05-29 Planting Freshly Burned Cutblocks.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
Fort St. James, B.C.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-06-26
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A gravel truck operator driving an end dump was spreading gravel when he noticed a root was stuck in the tailgate after his dump. He tried to pull the root out by hand and in doing so slammed his fingers in the tailgate when the root came out. He experienced minor bruising on three fingers but the potential for a serious injury was there.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

This alert is a reminder to use a tool such as a bar to safely remove debris to avoid injuries to hands.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Steve @ 250-996-8838

File attachments
2007-06-26 fingers piched in tailgate.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
NOOMAS RAILWAY BRIDGE – Half way between Woss and Port McNeill, BC.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-04-11
Company Name: 
Surespan Construction Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

During the removal of the bridge’s decking, Worker was looking for
extra dunnage which would be used for the collection of the remaining timber ties on the
bridge. Worker went to the west side of the north abutment and underneath the girders
to look for spare dunnage. He found one piece, approximately 5ft long (40lbs or more),
and proceeded to rest it vertically against the outside girder on the west side of the north
abutment. When the Worker was just about to go back underneath the girders to look for
more dunnage, the newly-found piece suddenly started falling south towards the
Worker’s location. Fortunately, the Worker was able to get out of the way in time. Had
the Worker been unable to get out of the way, the Worker would have sustained injuries
to his neck and back.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Remind workers not to rush tasks;
• Remind workers to not lean/store items on terrain that is uneven, it will
increase the chance of the item falling over;
• Review Safe Work Practice for Materials Handling and Storage;
• Have toolbox meeting to discuss near-miss and corrective action;
• Discuss near-miss incident at the next OHS Committee Meeting.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

angie@surespan.com
www.surespanconstruction.com

File attachments
2007-04-11 close call with dunnage.pdf

Safety Alert

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-06-01
Company Name: 
Weyerhaeuser / BC Forestlands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Two employees were using a steam pressure washer to clean off some mobile equipment in the yard at the end of the day. When finishing up they then used the pressure washer to clean off their work boots. After finishing cleaning off his own boots, the one employee proceeded to wash the other employees’ boots off as that employee held his leg out. A stream of hot steam/water shot up under the tongue of the worker’s boot resulting in a scald on the top of his foot.

The employee had to get medical aid treatment for the burn.


High pressure steam can cause severe burns to exposed skin, and high pressure air from an air hose onto exposed skin can cause an embolism which can be fatal.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

It is UNACCEPTABLE to use a steam cleaner or an air hose:
•on exposed skin, or
•to clean off any apparel while being worn

And always use appropriate PPE (eye protection and gloves) while using this equipment.
If in doubt about safe operation of this type of equipment ask your supervisor.

File attachments
2007-06-01 steam pressure washer leads to burn.pdf
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