Safety Alert

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-21
Company Name: 
Blackwater Construction
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A mechanic and a young apprentice were dropping a belly pan from a dozer. They had only one floor jack and wood blocks to secure the pan from falling. The pan slipped off the jack/blocks and impacted the apprentice’s right hand. There were no serious injuries and the apprentice was back at work for the next shift.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Please ensure that proper tools are used for the job. A proper jack would in all likelihood have prevented this incident from occurring. Do a pre-work to ensure safety. And remember, young workers need enhanced instructions and supervision to accomplish a job safely

File attachments
2007-11-21 Always Use Proper Equipment.pdf

HAZARD ALERT

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-20
Company Name: 
LTN Contracting Ltd. / Roga Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On November 20, 2007 at approximately 7:00 PM a contract lowbed (Roga Contracting Ltd.) was transporting a TigerCat 870 feller-buncher into a block.

While making a low speed right-hand turn, the lowbed bound up with the tractor. The resulting pressure caused the neck and deck to come apart (the lowbed came apart), with the latch pin failing and the d-ring keepers being bent.

There were no injuries and minimal damage to the lowbed from the mechanical failure of the attachment components.

The age of the lowbed is 10+ years. Maintenance records indicate a recent inspection and timely repair and service records.

Root cause for the equipment failure is age of equipment and underlying metal fatigue that is not visible to naked eye.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Remind lowbed drivers that they are professional drivers and it is their legal responsibility to monitor and inspect their equipment daily and notify their supervisor of any problems or potential problems immediately.
2. For all lowbed trailers over ten years of age, all attachment components are to be inspected monthly for signs of wear or fatigue by company mechanic or certified mechanic.
3. For all lowbed trailers, repair or replace lowbed attachment components as required, or schedule the work to be completed by a certified facility.

File attachments
2007-11-20 Pressure Causes Lowbed to Come Apart.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
K&D Shop Ft St James
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-12-01
Company Name: 
KDL Group
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The first worker to enter the shop that day encountered a hissing sound originating from the oxy/acetylene bottles. He discovered the bottles had been left on overnight. This is in contravention of the Cutting Torch Operation Training Brief. He quickly shut off the gas flow at the bottles and opened the shop doors to air out the building. He was able to accomplish this without any further consequences.
Due to the severity of the hazard, he was unable to discover the source of the hissing. The oxy/acetylene bottles were locked out and the hoses and flashback valves were replaced. After discussion with a welding supply dealer, it was learned that flashback valves need to be replaced every 2-3 years.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1)Workers are to be reminded of the consequences when company safe work procedures are not followed.
2)Flashback valves should be added to the company preventative maintenance program and replaced every 2 years.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Martin Elphee
Health & Safety Coordinator
KDL Group
250-996-8032

File attachments
2007-12-01 Close Call Involving Cutting Torch.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
Salmon River ML Bridge (White River), Sayward
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-02-07
Company Name: 
Surespan
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Worker attempted to lift a steel guardrail post in order to carry it to the bridge deck for installation. He realized it was too heavy and placed it back down, hitting his right knee in the process. If he continued to carry the guardrail post, he could have easily hurt his lower back.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

As noted in Surespan Construction’s Safe Work Practices & Safe Job Procedures Manual – Manual
Handling & Lifting:
• Do no attempt to lift or move objects that are obviously too heavy or bulky for one person to life or which require getting into an awkward position. Ask for help from a co-worker.
• Employees should be aware of their physical limitations and the approximate weight of the materials to avoid injury.
• Pipes, conduit, rebar and other conductive materials should not be carried out on the shoulder near exposed electrical equipment or conductors.
• Be aware of hazardous and unsafe conditions prior to lifting (i.e. slipping and tripping hazards).
• The use of powered equipment and lifting devices (i.e. forklift) should be considered and employed
when practical.
• Ensure you have a firm grip on the object before lifting it, ensure your hands and body are in the clear.
• Watch out for slivers, nails, and sharp ends when handling objects. If possible, these should be
removed from the object.
• Ensure you have a clear view of your route when carrying materials.
• When lifting:
o Keep your back as upright as possible;
o Avoid reaching out;
o Use leg muscles instead of back or stomach muscles; and,
o Avoid twisting motions.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

angie@surespan.com
www.surespan.com

File attachments
2007-02-07 lifting leads to injury.pdf

Safety Alert

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-01-05
Company Name: 
Weyerhaeuser / BC Forestlands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Several incidents have occurred across BC Forestlands in 2006 resulting in injuries to workers.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Some key learning’s are:

Avoiding Slips and Trips
• Wear footwear with good traction, especially in slippery winter conditions.
• Ensure there are stable surfaces to walk on if you are getting on equipment. Design and install improvements to lessen the risk of getting hurt (ie steps, non-slip surfaces).
• Use 3 point contact when getting in/ out and on/off anything (ie vehicles, equipment, walking over blowdown).

Know your limits
• Stretch after long periods of inactivity before undertaking a strenuous task.
• Be aware of your bodies limits, especially if you are at a higher risk of injury . Are the procedures suited to your abilities? (ie do you have a history of back problems? Are you getting less agile and flexible?).
• Think an activity through before you act.

File attachments
2007-01-05 BC Forestlands.pdf

Coastal Forest Strike

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-25
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The coastal forestry industry is now largely shut down as a result of a labour dispute between employers and the USW-IWA Council. Although safety has been raised as an issue during bargaining, this dispute is between the employers and the Union.
The Council respects the collective bargaining process. Council representatives will not be taking any stand on the labour dispute of the relative merits of either side’s position.
For the duration of the dispute, the Council will be making a number of changes to its operations. For those workers and companies involved with training and SAFE Company certification with the BC Forest Safety Council, this note provides you with some basic information about training and certification activities during the dispute.

SAFE Company Registration, Certification and Licencee/Owner timelines
•The BC Forest Safety Council will continue to accept and process any SAFE Companies registrations and completed audits received.
•If you are a large employer with an external audit scheduled, and you will be unable to carry out the audit due to work disruption, you need to contact your External Auditor and arrange for an extension.
•If you are an employer and the labour dispute will delay your program development or audit activities, your timeline will be automatically extended during the course of the labour dispute.
•If you have submitted your audit and the Council has asked you for additional information that is not available during the labour dispute, your file will be put on ‘hold’ until activities recommence.
•The BC Forest Safety Council does not set any timelines for SAFE Certification laid out by licencees or owners but we will communicate our position. You would be wise to check with those owners and licencees that you work with to ascertain their position.

Training Courses Run by the BC Forest Safety Council
•Some of the Council’s courses involve activities on active forestry sites. We will not be carrying out any activities (training, evaluations, etc.) on sites affected by the labour dispute. If alternative sites are not available, courses will be modified accordingly.
•We encourage everyone who has signed up for training to attend their planned session.
If you feel the dispute makes it impossible for you to attend your scheduled training, please cancel as far in advance as possible.

File attachments
2007-07-25 Coastal Forest Strike.pdf

Orienting New Workers and Young Workers

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-26
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

What is this?
Employers have always had a responsibility to make sure workers are prepared for the job before they start working. One part of that is orienting new workers to the health and safety information related to their job and worksite. WorkSafeBC has amended their regulations to clarify these responsibilities in a clear, specific way.

Do they affect me?
The nature of forestry operations (outdoor locations, changing conditions and sites etc) mean almost everyone operating in the sector should be aware of these new regulations and ensure that they are in compliance.

Specifically: If you hire any new worker under the age of 25 OR if a new worker is starting work at an existing worksite OR if existing workers are facing hazards on their current workplace that have changed or developed, OR if existing workers are in a new location that has different hazards than the old ones, then this regulation applies to your operation.
What do I have to do?

If you have been involved in some of our Council safety activities, the need and importance of safety orientations is very familiar:
•The Safety Tool kit that all SAFE Companies registrants receive discusses the safety orientation process in Chapter 8;
•Both the BASE and SEBASE audit address safety orientation in the training, education and certification requirements;
•The Small Employer OHS training course also reminds employers of their responsibilities around safety orientation and provides some sample tools for you to use in your program;
•People who have taken the Council’s Basic Forest Supervisor training are shown how
to assess initial worksite orientation requirements.
To refresh, there are 4 basic steps…
•Evaluate the situation;
•Train the worker;
•Test the worker;
•Keep records of the orientation.

WorkSafeBC has developed a sample worker orientation checklist that you can download as a Word document and modify to suit your needs and use for your workers. You can find the document here at http://www2.worksafebc.com/Topics/YoungWorker/Resources-Employers.asp?re... as well as more information about the new regulations.

Why this Change?
It’s simple – new workers and young workers are vulnerable to injuries – because of inexperience, not wanting to ask questions, and (sometimes) training that does not ensure they are competent to do their work.

It’s easy to take shortcuts when bringing new workers or young workers onto a worksite. Take the time to make sure they understand that safety is a priority. While this is only one part of changing the forest industry’s historically poor safety record it helps reinforce that unsafe is unacceptable.

File attachments
2007-07-26 Orienting New Workers and Young Workers.pdf

HAZARD ALERT

Safety Alert Type: 
Worksites
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-14
Company Name: 
Canfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Field crews potentially in the line of fire due to hunter activity near their worksite.

As Canfor employees rode their ATV’s back to their pickups at the end of the day they noticed some new shooting targets placed in the trees that put them in the line of fire. Although they were not actively shooting, hunters in a camp just down the road were using these targets. The hunters were not aware that there were people working behind their targets, as they had not seen the field crews ride in that morning.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. If you encounter any hunters and camps on your way to the field, stop and let them know you are in the area.
2. Leave a note or sign on un-occupied camps or pick-ups letting people know of your presence and location.
3. Place a sign indicating that people are actively working at the entrance to your worksite.

File attachments
2007-08-14 In the line of Fire.pdf

FATAL FORESTRY ACCIDENTS PREVENTABLE

Safety Alert Type: 
Worksites
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-01-25
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

VICTORIA – The BC Coroners Service is urging all operators of forestry and wood  manufacturing machinery to carry out proper lock-out/immobilization procedures, whenever performing any maintenance or repair.

 

“Already this year, we have witnessed three fatal incidents involving workers in forestry related activities,” said Resource Industry Coroner Tom Pawlowski. “We also want to urge all employers and supervisors to ensure that workers are familiar with, and use, proper risk assessment tools and safe work practices.”

In a recent incident, a worker troubleshooting a mechanical problem on a skidder was killed when the equipment rolled over him.

In 2006, there were six fatal incidents involving failure to lock-out, or immobilize machinery and mobile equipment. In virtually all of these cases, the deceased were experienced operators. Two incidents involved workers crushed while performing repairs on log processor heads that were not properly de-energized. The other cases involved drivers who were run over by their vehicles, and two workers, at wood processing and firewood manufacturing plants respectively, who failed to lock-out machinery before attempting maintenance or troubleshooting.

For more information on forestry safety, please visit WorkSafeBC at: www2.worksafebc.com/Portals/Forestry/Home.asp and the BC Forest Safety Council at www.bcforestsafe.org/nav-alerts.htm.

The BC Coroners Service is committed to conducting a thorough, independent examination of the factors contributing to death, and may provide recommendations to prevent a similar death in the future, in order to improve community safety and quality of life in British Columbia.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Terry Foster
Public Affairs Officer
Office of the Chief Coroner
604 660-7752

File attachments
2007-01-25 Proper Lock-out prodedures.pdf

Hazard Communication - BETWEEN PHASES

Safety Alert Type: 
Worksites
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2006-06-05
Company Name: 
Interfor Coastal Woolands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Many of the hazards in logging are ‘Man-Made’: hang-ups, loose rocks or stumps, improper placement of right-of-way logs, unstable cut banks, etc. Initially, these ‘man-made’ hazards should be prevented, or if need be, controlled as much as possible. However, if these hazards remain after the initial phase, their existence must be communicated to the next phase(s) of logging.
Upon completion of any phase of logging, an INSPECTION and DOCUMENTATION of hazards created in the course of the phase is required. As well as natural hazards left behind (e.g. snags), any identified ongoing ‘man-made’ hazards must be communicated via the attached written HAZARD REPORT. (This Hazard Report form is also available in the back-end of the Safety Alert/Bulletin Binder provided to all Prime Contractors.)
If the initial logging or road construction phase involves employees or a Sub-Contractor hired by the Prime Contractor, it is the responsibility of the Prime Contractor to ensure this post-phase Hazard Assessment is completed and COMMUNICATED to next phase(s). If the initial phase of work is completed by a Contractor hired by the Licensee, it is the responsibility of Interfor staff to arrange for any mitigation of the hazards, and/or their communication as part of the PRE-WORKS to the Contractor Representative responsible for the next phase of work in this cut-block or road-heading.

File attachments
2006-06-05 between phases.pdf
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