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Vehicle Rollover

Location: 
Peace Liard Woodlands
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-05
Company Name: 
Canfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On November 5, 2007 a Canfor staff member was enroute to Prince George from Fort St. John for work purposes. During travel, the employee encountered poor weather and deteriorating driving conditions (current snow fall, just below zero temperatures, slippery/snow packed road surfaces and reduced visibility) when reaching Mount Lemoray, after traveling for approximately three hours, the staff member assessed the worsening road/weather conditions and made the decision to turn around and return to Fort St. John. Once in cell phone range, the staff member notified the Fort St John office that they were returning. At approximately 1:00 p.m., while traveling on a straight stretch of Highway 97 approximately 10 kilometers east of Groundbirch, (the staff member reports driving at 70km/per hour due to road conditions) the vehicle hit a patch of ice, swerved to the right and then swerved to the left, and then began spinning in circles down the middle of the highway. The vehicle hit the ditch, rolled over once and then rolled again landing on the roof. The staff member was able to climb out of the truck through the driver side window and summon assistance from oncoming traffic. Thankfully as a result of the staff member wearing a seat belt only minor injuries (bruising and soft tissue) were sustained.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1.All employees need to continue to wear seatbelts at all times. This incident clearly reinforces why they need to be worn at all times. Seatbelts save lives and prevent serious injuries from occurring.
2.Winter driving is a tricky and can be a dangerous business. Better roads, better cars and better tires won’t take the place of careful driving practices. All employees must continually assess road and weather conditions and adjust their speed of travel. Key winter hazards to be aware of are: freezing rain, heavy/blowing snow, slippery compacted roads and poor visibility. Even once a risk assessment is performed, when driving in poor winter conditions, employees need to continuously assess adverse weather and road conditions and are reminded that sudden changes may occur and vehicle reaction time is extremely reduced in poor weather/road conditions.
3.
Make sure that vehicles are equipped with a good winter driving tires and check tire pressure prior to traveling, also make sure that your vehicle is equipped with a winter survival kit.
4.Assess your travel plans, if travel can be avoided during times of poor winter weather, make alternate arrangements. Remember that your safety requires you to exercise good judgment at all times. If you must travel give yourself plenty of extra time for getting to your destination. Speed limits are for perfect, dry conditions. On winter’s icy roadways, reducing your speed to half the speed limit may not be enough.
5.If extreme driving conditions are encountered, pulling over in a safe area and waiting for conditions to improve (plowing, sanding, snow melting and or snow fall ceasing) should also be considered.

File attachments
2007-11-05 Icy Roads to blame for Vechile Rollover.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Chilliwack River Road
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-29
Company Name: 
Chartwell Consultants Ltd. / B. A. Blackwell and Associates
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Driving east on Chilliwack River Road, approximately 1 km from the turn off of Vedder Road. Truck was proceeding at the speed limit (60km/h) around a gentle corner when they hit black ice and started to fishtail. The driver tried to steer out of the skid, but the truck skidded across the center line and ended up in the ditch on the opposite side of the road. The truck almost completely rolled over and ended up on its side (driver side down).

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Ensure that all employees are aware of winter driving procedures (see attached). Encourage employees to slow down if they think that there is a possibility of black ice or slick driving conditions. Ensure that all employees are checking the weather and temperature prior to heading out in the morning and knowing what the conditions are supposed to be for their drive home as well. Consider driver training if the above procedures seem inadequate for area that employees will be driving in. Ensure pre-trip inspections are being conducted and hazards are identified (e.g. equipment or vehicular deficiencies).

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Jessica McDonald; Chartwell Consultants Ltd. – 604-980-5061
Kyle Broome; B. A. Blackwell and Associates – 604-986-8346

File attachments
2007-11-29 Black Ice Results in Truck Hitting Ditch.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Campbell River
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-01-30
Company Name: 
Strathcona Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Drill swamper was retrieving the drill hole cones from the front of the tank drill where they had been placed as the operator continued to drill. The drill hammer hose ruptured at the fitting where it leaves the machine and blew off the fitting taking the whip check with it. The whip check, a device utilized to prevent the “fly-away” behaviour of air lines under pressure was improperly anchored and did not function. The drill swamper’s hard hat was struck by the whip check as it was propelled thru the air before coming to rest. This was a close call incident with no injury to workers.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1) Drill crews to ensure correct placement of whip checks during prework inspections.
2) Anchor points must be visible, allowing for visual inspections by drill crews as well as maintenance personnel.
3) Drill crews to perform routine tug test on whip check to confirm security of attachment.
4) Suspect whip checks must be replaced or repositioned prior to commencement of work.
5) All workers to be aware of the potential hazards of working in close proximity to high pressure air lines.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Strathcona Contracting Ltd.

File attachments
2007-01-30 drill swapper close call.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Campbell River, B.C.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-04-28
Company Name: 
Strathcona Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Drill swamper was using a sledge hammer to hammer loose a coupling from a broken 10-foot drill steel. The drill steel and attached coupler were placed on the ground to provide for a solid base. The employee was somewhat hurried in his actions in that he wanted to have the coupler freed by the time the driller had completed his current length of steel. The employee removed his safety glasses to provide a clearer view of the object(s) he was trying to hammer loose. Upon hitting the steel and coupling with the sledge hammer, a piece of rock was dislodged from beneath or alongside the steel and struck the employee in the right eye. The employee was taken to the Campbell River District Hospital for assessment and further treatment, as req’d. This incident became a lost time injury as the employee suffered lacerations to the cornea. The employee returned to work the following week.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1.)Employees reminded of their responsibilities for maintaining PPE in good condition and for requesting replacement when necessary.
2.)Employees reminded to wear appropriate PPE when conducting work activities for the Company. This policy is not optional.
3.)Company supervisors to inspect condition of PPE during site inspections and replace as required.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Strathcona Contracting Ltd.

File attachments
2007-04-28 Wear your PPE.pdf

Chokerman Injured While Working on Snow-Covered Slope

Location: 
BC Southern Interior / Sandon, BC.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-01-06
Company Name: 
H.A. Friedenberger Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A chokerman was injured while working on a snow-covered slope above Sandon, BC. He was attempting to fasten a choker onto a snow-covered subalpine fir tree so the tree could be cable yarded up the hill to the landing. The chokerman was walking along a suspended tree when he lost his footing and tumbled off the tree and landed on a stump.
He suffered injuries to his upper left leg and ribs, and because he could not walk on his own accord, he had to be transported in a basket stretcher up the hill by his co-workers. The chokerman was evacuated from the yarder landing by emergency transport vehicle to the hospital facilities in New Denver, BC – almost twenty kilometers from the incident location.
The injured worker was examined by a doctor and X-rayed at the hospital. Although the X-ray indicated no bones were broken, there was evidence massive bruising to the leg and ribs. The worker was discharged from the hospital and he will not be returning to work for at least two weeks.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Plan logging operations in areas of high snowfall so that falling operations are carried out only a few days ahead of the yarding operations. Doing so will reduce the amount of snow covering the felled timber and make it easier to access the timber so that chokers may be fastened to the trees. (Ensure that safe distances from falling operations are maintained at all times).
• Use extreme caution when walking on snow-covered trees / logs. The snow may hide tripping hazards and holes that a worker cannot see.
• Clean mud and snow from caulk boots frequently. Mud and snow will pack between the caulks, creating a smooth surface and making the boots heavy and cumbersome. A branch or stick will usually suffice unless the snow or mud is frozen to the bottom of the boots.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

H.A. Friedenberger Contracting Ltd., Nakusp, BC

File attachments
2007-01-06 Injury while on snow-covered slope.pdf

Industry Hazard Alert

Location: 
Badger Road Kamloops Area
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-05-18
Company Name: 
Tolko Industries Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

This was a “near miss” accident

Worker was driving down a tertiary road adjacent to some small scale salvage to talk to the buncher operator.
The top of a felled tree came in contact with the worker’s pick-up. There were no injuries. Key points to consider:
· Road was signed but not blocked
· Buncher was working adjacent to the road
· When worker approached the buncher – he thought that the operator had seen him
· Worker did not make radio contact with buncher operator to notify him that he was on site

Learnings and Suggestions: 

· All work sites must be controlled and active falling sites blocked
· When approaching any active logging equipment, contact operator to ensure that he is aware that you are on site and has ensured the work site is safe.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Thompson Nicola Woodlands,
Tolko Industries Ltd.

David Bickerton, Regional Woodlands Manager
david.bickerton@tolko.com (250) 578-2174

File attachments
2007-05-18 top of feller tree hits truck.pdf

SAFETY INFORMATION

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-05-30
Company Name: 
Cougar Inlet Logging Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

During an inspection our loader operators noticed that our two new hydraulic log loaders had a very hard to open (“coke bottle like”) cap on the escape hatch. The operators found that they would have trouble opening the escape hatch should they need to in an emergency.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

“Dog bones” have been ordered to be welded on - one for the inside of the cab for the operator to use and one for the outside (should the operator be unable to use the inside handle and rescuers need to get in from the outside).

Operators should open their escape hatches periodically to ensure that it easily opens.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Glenda Inrig, Cougar Inlet Logging Ltd.
(250) 287-3083

File attachments
2007-05-30 inspection of escape hatch.pdf

Worker injured his finger while shutting the door on the Bandit Machine

Location: 
North Quonset Hut
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-02-01
Company Name: 
Western Forest Products
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

In February 2007, the operator of a Bandit Machine pulled into the North Quonset Hut to load wire spools onto the back of the machine. The operator opened the door and exited out of the back of the cab. Prior to stepping off the platform onto the deck, the operator used his hip to close the door. At the same time, he was holding the door along the edge, causing his left index finger to be pinched in the door as it closed. The worker was sent to the hospital for stitches to his finger.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Ensure proper placement of hands for task and always use the door handle to close doors

File attachments
2007-02-01 closed door on finger.pdf

Safety Incident Alert

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-03
Company Name: 
Blackwater Construction
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A processor operator was exiting the cab. The door swung closed. The handle was bent towards the door, not leaving enough room for his hand as the door closed. This resulted in a hard impact to his knuckles.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Replace bent handle with hydraulic hose.
All operators are asked to take time while exiting their machine. As well, park on level ground so you do not have the heavy door swinging at you.

File attachments
2007-07-03 hand slamed in door.pdf

Madill 124 Grapple Yarder Pulled Over By Lines

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-01-08
Company Name: 
Western Forest Products
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

After rigging a new tailhold and hanging the guyline, the grapple yarder operator started moving his machine down the road to park it in a turnout for the weekend. While proceeding down the road, the guyline, mainline and haulback lines were all slack. The operator walked the machine approximately 50 feet, when without warning the machine started tilting to the left and then fell over onto the boom.
It was later determined that this incident was caused by the interlock regen lever being engaged and as a result the haulback line picking up, while the machine was traveling down the road. It is unclear on whether the operator bumped the lever, or the vibration from the machine from traveling down the road may have caused the lever to jump into gear.

Upset Conditions:
1. The operator did not disengage the winches when moving the machine so that only the travel function was active as stated in the operating manual.
2. The machine operator and supervisors were not familiar with the operating manual requirements for this machine.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. All Timberlands Operations should immediately ensure that supervisors and employees are familiar with the operating manual of machines that they operate and supervise.
2. All Timberlands should update their safe work procedures (JSB) for the Madill 124, to state that winches must be disengaged prior to traveling machine.

File attachments
2007-01-08 Grapple Yarder Pulled over by lines.pdf
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