BC Forest Safety Council | Safety is good business



Chokerman Injured While Working on Snow-Covered Slope

Location: 
BC Southern Interior / Sandon, BC.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-01-06
Company Name: 
H.A. Friedenberger Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A chokerman was injured while working on a snow-covered slope above Sandon, BC. He was attempting to fasten a choker onto a snow-covered subalpine fir tree so the tree could be cable yarded up the hill to the landing. The chokerman was walking along a suspended tree when he lost his footing and tumbled off the tree and landed on a stump.
He suffered injuries to his upper left leg and ribs, and because he could not walk on his own accord, he had to be transported in a basket stretcher up the hill by his co-workers. The chokerman was evacuated from the yarder landing by emergency transport vehicle to the hospital facilities in New Denver, BC – almost twenty kilometers from the incident location.
The injured worker was examined by a doctor and X-rayed at the hospital. Although the X-ray indicated no bones were broken, there was evidence massive bruising to the leg and ribs. The worker was discharged from the hospital and he will not be returning to work for at least two weeks.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Plan logging operations in areas of high snowfall so that falling operations are carried out only a few days ahead of the yarding operations. Doing so will reduce the amount of snow covering the felled timber and make it easier to access the timber so that chokers may be fastened to the trees. (Ensure that safe distances from falling operations are maintained at all times).
• Use extreme caution when walking on snow-covered trees / logs. The snow may hide tripping hazards and holes that a worker cannot see.
• Clean mud and snow from caulk boots frequently. Mud and snow will pack between the caulks, creating a smooth surface and making the boots heavy and cumbersome. A branch or stick will usually suffice unless the snow or mud is frozen to the bottom of the boots.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

H.A. Friedenberger Contracting Ltd., Nakusp, BC

File attachments
2007-01-06 Injury while on snow-covered slope.pdf

Industry Hazard Alert

Location: 
Badger Road Kamloops Area
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-05-18
Company Name: 
Tolko Industries Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

This was a “near miss” accident

Worker was driving down a tertiary road adjacent to some small scale salvage to talk to the buncher operator.
The top of a felled tree came in contact with the worker’s pick-up. There were no injuries. Key points to consider:
· Road was signed but not blocked
· Buncher was working adjacent to the road
· When worker approached the buncher – he thought that the operator had seen him
· Worker did not make radio contact with buncher operator to notify him that he was on site

Learnings and Suggestions: 

· All work sites must be controlled and active falling sites blocked
· When approaching any active logging equipment, contact operator to ensure that he is aware that you are on site and has ensured the work site is safe.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Thompson Nicola Woodlands,
Tolko Industries Ltd.

David Bickerton, Regional Woodlands Manager
david.bickerton@tolko.com (250) 578-2174

File attachments
2007-05-18 top of feller tree hits truck.pdf

SAFETY INFORMATION

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-05-30
Company Name: 
Cougar Inlet Logging Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

During an inspection our loader operators noticed that our two new hydraulic log loaders had a very hard to open (“coke bottle like”) cap on the escape hatch. The operators found that they would have trouble opening the escape hatch should they need to in an emergency.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

“Dog bones” have been ordered to be welded on - one for the inside of the cab for the operator to use and one for the outside (should the operator be unable to use the inside handle and rescuers need to get in from the outside).

Operators should open their escape hatches periodically to ensure that it easily opens.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Glenda Inrig, Cougar Inlet Logging Ltd.
(250) 287-3083

File attachments
2007-05-30 inspection of escape hatch.pdf

Worker injured his finger while shutting the door on the Bandit Machine

Location: 
North Quonset Hut
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-02-01
Company Name: 
Western Forest Products
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

In February 2007, the operator of a Bandit Machine pulled into the North Quonset Hut to load wire spools onto the back of the machine. The operator opened the door and exited out of the back of the cab. Prior to stepping off the platform onto the deck, the operator used his hip to close the door. At the same time, he was holding the door along the edge, causing his left index finger to be pinched in the door as it closed. The worker was sent to the hospital for stitches to his finger.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Ensure proper placement of hands for task and always use the door handle to close doors

File attachments
2007-02-01 closed door on finger.pdf

Safety Incident Alert

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-03
Company Name: 
Blackwater Construction
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A processor operator was exiting the cab. The door swung closed. The handle was bent towards the door, not leaving enough room for his hand as the door closed. This resulted in a hard impact to his knuckles.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Replace bent handle with hydraulic hose.
All operators are asked to take time while exiting their machine. As well, park on level ground so you do not have the heavy door swinging at you.

File attachments
2007-07-03 hand slamed in door.pdf

Madill 124 Grapple Yarder Pulled Over By Lines

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-01-08
Company Name: 
Western Forest Products
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

After rigging a new tailhold and hanging the guyline, the grapple yarder operator started moving his machine down the road to park it in a turnout for the weekend. While proceeding down the road, the guyline, mainline and haulback lines were all slack. The operator walked the machine approximately 50 feet, when without warning the machine started tilting to the left and then fell over onto the boom.
It was later determined that this incident was caused by the interlock regen lever being engaged and as a result the haulback line picking up, while the machine was traveling down the road. It is unclear on whether the operator bumped the lever, or the vibration from the machine from traveling down the road may have caused the lever to jump into gear.

Upset Conditions:
1. The operator did not disengage the winches when moving the machine so that only the travel function was active as stated in the operating manual.
2. The machine operator and supervisors were not familiar with the operating manual requirements for this machine.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. All Timberlands Operations should immediately ensure that supervisors and employees are familiar with the operating manual of machines that they operate and supervise.
2. All Timberlands should update their safe work procedures (JSB) for the Madill 124, to state that winches must be disengaged prior to traveling machine.

File attachments
2007-01-08 Grapple Yarder Pulled over by lines.pdf

Equipment Operator Dislocates Shoulder

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-01-07
Company Name: 
Weyerhaeuser / BC Forestlands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Recently a processor operator was injured while exiting his machine. Using the hand holds on the inside of the door and the door frame (see photo) he stepped from the tracks down onto the step below the tracks. As he lowered his right leg, a gust of wind caused the door to suddenly move. He subsequently lost his balance and fell from the machine while hanging onto the door hold. This sequence of events led to him dislocating his shoulder.

Although the door is very heavy, the windy conditions with even stronger gusts were enough to unexpectedly move the door. On this older machine the door is designed to swing freely in a wide open position (back against the cab).

Exiting with the door half open is favoured by most operators when they enter/exit, as it is a comfortable reach to the door hand hold. In the wide open position some operators’ arms are overextended when they reach for the door hand hold while stepping onto the track step.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Review the doors on all your heavy equipment. If the doors are designed to swing freely when opened, and the operators use it an “unlatched” open position, then you need to either;
1) review procedures used for entry/exit to control this hazard, or
2) alter the design of the door to prevent sudden movements when opened.

File attachments
2007-01-07 Equipment Operator dislocates shoulder.pdf

Hooktender Struck by Log

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-04-01
Company Name: 
Western Forest Products
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The grapple crew was yarding down a 35-45% north facing slope and had moved up to the top of a 4 meter high bluff that put yarding outside of deflection. The hooktender called for chokers to be sent up to reach the wood above the bluff. He stood by a stump along the
side of the bluff approximately 10 meters away from the running lines and waited for the chokers facing towards the lines and the direction from which the grapple would be coming. From where he was standing, he was unable to see the grapple coming up the hill however he was able to see the lines moving and knew the empty grapple was coming. The grapple skidded over the break of the bluff and struck a log causing it to move and pivot. The butt end of the log was close to where the hook tender was standing and when it moved it struck him on the inside of his left knee and knocked him against the stump. The hooktender was taken to hospital and received stitches and an x-ray before being released that day.

Upset Conditions:
1. Hooktender did not follow Safe Work Procedures for moving above and behind the turn when the grapple was moving.
2. Grapple Yarder did not take advantage of clear deflection from upper road and the hooktender attempted to use chokers to reach wood that was outside of deflection.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Supervisors must walk each block and lay out an efficient plan prior to starting work. This basic plan needs to be relayed to the crew with clear expectations from the Supervisor. If they are unsure they should stop work and contact their Supervisor. For safe and efficient yarding, the crew must assess each portion of the block and plan the yarding according to safe access. The yarding crew in this incident had the opportunity to gain better deflection if they rigged the yarder on the upper spur. Supervisors need to do checks as needed to ensure the plan is unfolding as discussed.
2. Safe Work Procedures are put in place as a result of incidents in the past with the intention to keep us from harms way. By standing too close and below the turn of the log the employee was not following the SWP causing him to be injured. SWP’s should be reviewed frequently and used as rules that govern our actions at work. Inspect against expectations.

File attachments
2007-04-01 Hooktender struck by log.pdf

2007-02-26 Operator fractures foot

Location: 
Cicero
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-02-26
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Employee was repairing the head on his processor and was exiting and entering his machine to align the head to replace a broken pin. When exiting his machine, he slipped off the cat walk and fractured the inside of his left foot.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Use the handrails when exiting and entering the machine.  Use a 3 point mount / dismount.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

 BC Forest Safety Council

 

“Unsafe is Unacceptable”

 

 

File attachments
2007-02-26 Operator fractures foot.pdf

Contractor Fatality

Location: 
Quesnel Woodlands
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-19
Company Name: 
West Fraser
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

At approximately 9:15 am on July 19, 2007 the operator of a John Deere 648 grapple skidder was skidding parallel to the contours on a slope of approximately 30-40%, when the machine became unstable and rolled. The operator may have been in the process of positioning the machine to retrieve bunched logs on the side slope. The machine then continued to roll at least three more times down a 65-70% slope before coming to rest approximately 300 feet down the hill.

The operator was the principal of the contracting firm on site and was the prime contractor designated for this site. He had extensive experience, was familiar with the equipment and was known to be a competent machine operator. The seatbelt in the machine sustained mechanical or chemical damage prior to this incident and was being worn at the time of the incident; however, the belt failed (ripped) at the point of the damage during the roll over. The skidder was equipped with doors, which remained closed and the operator was not ejected from the machine. The cab of the skidder sustained minimal damage.

First aid was provided on site immediately following the accident. Unfortunately the operator did succumb to his injuries and was pronounced dead on the scene by the BC Ambulance Service. The accident is currently being investigated by the Coroner’s office and Worksafe BC. Further details will be available once the investigations are complete.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

oReview procedure for skidding parallel to side slopes. Skidding parallel to side slopes at or near maximum operable slopes for machines is not a Best Practice. Alternate solutions to forward logs should be considered.
oReview equipment and machinery inspection procedures for seatbelts. Immediately review all existing in service belts. Damaged or deteriorated seatbelts should be removed from service immediately and replaced with acceptable seatbelt restraints.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Rob Stauffer at 250- 992-0811 or Kerry Douglas 250-992-0828

File attachments
2007-07-19 Contractor Fatality.pdf
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