Equipment Operator Dislocates Shoulder

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-01-07
Company Name: 
Weyerhaeuser / BC Forestlands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Recently a processor operator was injured while exiting his machine. Using the hand holds on the inside of the door and the door frame (see photo) he stepped from the tracks down onto the step below the tracks. As he lowered his right leg, a gust of wind caused the door to suddenly move. He subsequently lost his balance and fell from the machine while hanging onto the door hold. This sequence of events led to him dislocating his shoulder.

Although the door is very heavy, the windy conditions with even stronger gusts were enough to unexpectedly move the door. On this older machine the door is designed to swing freely in a wide open position (back against the cab).

Exiting with the door half open is favoured by most operators when they enter/exit, as it is a comfortable reach to the door hand hold. In the wide open position some operators’ arms are overextended when they reach for the door hand hold while stepping onto the track step.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Review the doors on all your heavy equipment. If the doors are designed to swing freely when opened, and the operators use it an “unlatched” open position, then you need to either;
1) review procedures used for entry/exit to control this hazard, or
2) alter the design of the door to prevent sudden movements when opened.

File attachments
2007-01-07 Equipment Operator dislocates shoulder.pdf

Hooktender Struck by Log

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-04-01
Company Name: 
Western Forest Products
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The grapple crew was yarding down a 35-45% north facing slope and had moved up to the top of a 4 meter high bluff that put yarding outside of deflection. The hooktender called for chokers to be sent up to reach the wood above the bluff. He stood by a stump along the
side of the bluff approximately 10 meters away from the running lines and waited for the chokers facing towards the lines and the direction from which the grapple would be coming. From where he was standing, he was unable to see the grapple coming up the hill however he was able to see the lines moving and knew the empty grapple was coming. The grapple skidded over the break of the bluff and struck a log causing it to move and pivot. The butt end of the log was close to where the hook tender was standing and when it moved it struck him on the inside of his left knee and knocked him against the stump. The hooktender was taken to hospital and received stitches and an x-ray before being released that day.

Upset Conditions:
1. Hooktender did not follow Safe Work Procedures for moving above and behind the turn when the grapple was moving.
2. Grapple Yarder did not take advantage of clear deflection from upper road and the hooktender attempted to use chokers to reach wood that was outside of deflection.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Supervisors must walk each block and lay out an efficient plan prior to starting work. This basic plan needs to be relayed to the crew with clear expectations from the Supervisor. If they are unsure they should stop work and contact their Supervisor. For safe and efficient yarding, the crew must assess each portion of the block and plan the yarding according to safe access. The yarding crew in this incident had the opportunity to gain better deflection if they rigged the yarder on the upper spur. Supervisors need to do checks as needed to ensure the plan is unfolding as discussed.
2. Safe Work Procedures are put in place as a result of incidents in the past with the intention to keep us from harms way. By standing too close and below the turn of the log the employee was not following the SWP causing him to be injured. SWP’s should be reviewed frequently and used as rules that govern our actions at work. Inspect against expectations.

File attachments
2007-04-01 Hooktender struck by log.pdf

2007-02-26 Operator fractures foot

Location: 
Cicero
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-02-26
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Employee was repairing the head on his processor and was exiting and entering his machine to align the head to replace a broken pin. When exiting his machine, he slipped off the cat walk and fractured the inside of his left foot.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Use the handrails when exiting and entering the machine.  Use a 3 point mount / dismount.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

 BC Forest Safety Council

 

“Unsafe is Unacceptable”

 

 

File attachments
2007-02-26 Operator fractures foot.pdf

Contractor Fatality

Location: 
Quesnel Woodlands
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-19
Company Name: 
West Fraser
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

At approximately 9:15 am on July 19, 2007 the operator of a John Deere 648 grapple skidder was skidding parallel to the contours on a slope of approximately 30-40%, when the machine became unstable and rolled. The operator may have been in the process of positioning the machine to retrieve bunched logs on the side slope. The machine then continued to roll at least three more times down a 65-70% slope before coming to rest approximately 300 feet down the hill.

The operator was the principal of the contracting firm on site and was the prime contractor designated for this site. He had extensive experience, was familiar with the equipment and was known to be a competent machine operator. The seatbelt in the machine sustained mechanical or chemical damage prior to this incident and was being worn at the time of the incident; however, the belt failed (ripped) at the point of the damage during the roll over. The skidder was equipped with doors, which remained closed and the operator was not ejected from the machine. The cab of the skidder sustained minimal damage.

First aid was provided on site immediately following the accident. Unfortunately the operator did succumb to his injuries and was pronounced dead on the scene by the BC Ambulance Service. The accident is currently being investigated by the Coroner’s office and Worksafe BC. Further details will be available once the investigations are complete.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

oReview procedure for skidding parallel to side slopes. Skidding parallel to side slopes at or near maximum operable slopes for machines is not a Best Practice. Alternate solutions to forward logs should be considered.
oReview equipment and machinery inspection procedures for seatbelts. Immediately review all existing in service belts. Damaged or deteriorated seatbelts should be removed from service immediately and replaced with acceptable seatbelt restraints.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Rob Stauffer at 250- 992-0811 or Kerry Douglas 250-992-0828

File attachments
2007-07-19 Contractor Fatality.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Kootenay Lake, Sanca Creek
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-17
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On a downhill yarding operation, the operator of the control panel outside of the Skylead yarder was following his safe work procedures for removing landed wood from the front of the yarder. The movement of this landed wood caused one of the larger pieces to slide over other logs down the slope where a 20 foot top piece was broken-off by a stump that was helping direct yarded wood. This top was launched down the slope in a spinning motion and struck the operator on the back of his hard-hat, throwing him over the skid trail embankment, approximately 10 metres down-slope. The operator suffered head, neck, shoulder and wrist injuries. The hard-hat, which saved his life, was cracked and the insert was destroyed. He was standing in a area deemed safe for when wood is being skidded from the front of the yarder and did not notice the loosened log sliding down the slope directly above his position.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Additional instruction added to safe work procedures for operator of the yarder panel. Worker must stand behind the yarder or at least up the trail a minimum of 50 metres while wood is being skidded away from yarder.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Brant Watson at 250-489-0411 or Don Vaillancourt at 250-866-5412

File attachments
2007-08-17 Hard hat saves life.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Campbell River
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-03-21
Company Name: 
Thibault Logging Ltd. /Critical Site Logging Inc.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Conditions: Snow covered ground.

Feller Buncher fell the leaning tree on the low side of two trees grown together. Unaware, he had nicked the back tree at ground level in the cutting process. A hand faller came in to fall the back tree. Hand faller did not see the nick because of fresh snow on the ground. He started his first cut of the tree, and proceeded to start his back cut, when the tree started to pinch. He inserted a wedge in about ½” to 1”, he heard a pop and tree started to fall uphill. Faller managed to put out and escape before the tree hit the ground.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

When feller buncher cutting trees that are grown together take both trees or leave them for hand fallers if both cuts cannot be completed.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Thibault Logging Ltd. /Critical Site Logging Inc.
Phone: (250) 542-8922

File attachments
2007-03-21 Faller close call.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Tolko License Area - approximately 100 km West of Williams Lake
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-17
Company Name: 
Ken & Fred Ilnicki Developments Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

648 John Deere skidder rollover:
Worker was pulling a drag of trees up a mild slope of approximately 5% grade. Upon nearing the top portion of the slope, one of the front skidder tires began to sink into the ground. Worker turned the wheels slightly to avoid getting stuck and in doing so put the machine in a position where a portion of it paralleled the slope for a brief period. The right side of the skidder was on the higher uphill side when the right front tire went overtop a stump. This shifted a portion of the weight to the lower downhill side of the machine, which was crossing over wet chunks of woody debris that were laying on the ground perpendicular to the slope. The machine slid downhill on this debris, becoming unstable and flipping over onto its side. The drag of trees in the grapple appeared to prevent a complete rollover. The operator was wearing his seatbelt and he was able to unbuckle and exit the machine, shaken but uninjured.

Weather conditions at the time of incident were light showers that started approximately 40 minutes prior to the incident and ended shortly thereafter. This recent and brief rainfall was enough to provide an immediate hazard for slippery conditions; however, due to the minimal slope of the work area, it was unexpected.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Operations immediately ceased and a safety meeting was held on site with work crew. Reminder that machines are to move straight up and down slopes as set out in the safe work procedures. Use of seatbelts mandatory.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Benjamin R. Korving, RPF
Company Forester
Ken & Fred Ilnicki Developments Ltd.
korvings@telus.net

File attachments
2007-08-17 Machine slids downhill.pdf

Close Call for Hooktender

Location: 
BC Southern Interior
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-01
Company Name: 
Reitmeier Logging Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A cable yarder was moved to a new location and the cable yarder operator and hooktender were rigging up the guy lines to stabilize the cable yarder spar. The cable yarder operator and hooktender were stringing guy lines and attaching them to stump anchors. The yarder operator attached a guy line to the strawline with a chain, and the guyline was
being winched into position.

As the guyline was being winched, tension on the strawline became temporarily slack. At this moment, the chain used to attach the guyline loosened and unhooked from the strawline. The guy line travelled freely down the steep slope, very nearly striking the hooktender as the line passed his position.

The free-falling guy line had the potential to cause a serious injury to any person in its path.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. The ends of chains used to attach lines to strawlines should be taped with electricians tape. This will help keep the chain from unravelling when tension of the lines is slacked.
2. Persons stringing lines must ensure they are not in the bight of the winching mechanism.
3. Persons stringing lines must position themselves such so that they are not in the path of any lines that could travel uncontrolled due to a break or unravelling of securing chains, etc.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Reitmeier Logging Ltd, New Denver, BC

File attachments
2007-09-01 Close Call for Hooktender.pdf

SAFETY HAZARD ALERT

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-13
Company Name: 
WESTLINE HARVESTING LTD.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On September 13, 2007 a grapple skidder operator was attempting to push a loose stump out of the way. The operator turned the skidder sharply on a 10% side slope and was pushing the stump out of the way when the inside rear tire contacted a stump and caused the skidder to tip over on its side. Fortunately, no injuries occurred and damage was under $200.00

This incident had the potential for injury and greater damage.

ROOT CAUSES:
- Lack of situational awareness (operator was focused on stump being pushed and failed to notice the stump which caused the tip-over)
- Working on a side slope, and having the steering turned sharply (elevated center of gravity and reduced stance/footprint)

Learnings and Suggestions: 

-Work up/down a slope whenever possible.
-Use extreme caution when working on a side slope, and watch closely for stability hazards (stumps, rocks, etc.)
-Avoid sharp turns with articulated equipment, especially on side slopes.

File attachments
2007-09-13 Stump Causes Skidder to Roll on Side.pdf

Hooktender was hit by a log while going ahead on a turn

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-09
Company Name: 
Western Forest Products
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

At approximately 8:30am on October 9, 2007, a hooktender was struck by a log. The hooktender was using chokers off the grapple near the back end of the block. While going ahead on the turn, the choked logs became hung-up. The hooktender then signaled the Grapple Operator to skin the logs back up the hill. In doing so, the grapple was skinned back up and over the log identified in the picture (marked “X”). (Note the choked logs remained on the low side of log “X”). When he signaled to go ahead on the turn again, the Grapple bumped into log “X” causing it to break and pivot off Stump “A” and swing backwards towards the timber edge, striking both himself and a small 12” sapling (marked “B”). The worker was thrown approximately 6 feet back up the hill. Preliminary findings show that the sapling took most of the impact. The worker was sent to the hospital where it was later assessed that he had severe bruising and no broken bones.

Factors:
#1) Worker was standing too close to the turn.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Workers are at high risk of injury if they do not follow the procedures and ensure that they are in the clear.
2. Workers need to constantly assess the risk and hazards, and re-assess when the dynamics of the work area has changed. For example when a turn is hung
up and needs to be skinned back up the hill, the worker must re-assess his surroundings before proceeding.
3. Maximize deflection opportunities where opportunities exist.
4. Supervisors must periodically conduct worksite inspections to ensure workers are following safe work procedures for being in the clear and also review the logging plan.

File attachments
2007-10-09 Hooktender Hit by Log While Goingt Ahead on a Turn.pdf
« first‹ previous9293949596979899100next ›last »
Careers | Contact Us | Top | Privacy Statement | Terms and Conditions |
Copyright © 2008-2018 BC Forest Safety Council. All rights reserved.
|