Login

HAZARD ALERT

Location: 
½ km on the 400 Road
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-16
Company Name: 
LTN Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On July 16, 2007 at approximately 6:00 AM a Dodge 3500 pick-up (with Cummins diesel) was traveling at ½ km on the 400 Road when the passenger side front tie rod broke, causing a loss of steering for the pick-up. The pick-up was doing 25 KMH at the time so experienced no damage and did not result in an accident.

The operator was able to maneuver the pick-up into a pullout and came to a stop. The pick-up was towed to town and repairs were completed.

This is the fourth such incident to occur within our organization involving bush pick-ups in the past two years. Two pick-ups in Kamloops and one in Prince George also had their tie rods break while traveling to or from the bush, one resulting in a lost time accident for the operator.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1.For all vehicles, front end components are to be inspected monthly for signs of wear by the company mechanic. Repair / replace as required, or schedule the work to be completed by an auto repair shop.
2.Vehicles are to have their Tie Rods, Ball Joints and other front end components professionally inspected at 60,000 KM and repaired / replaced as required.
3.It is recommended that Tie Rods be replaced at 60,000 KM as a preventative maintenance measure.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

LTN Contracting Ltd.
Branch Office
#200 – 180 Victoria Street
Prince George, B.C. V2L 2J2
Ph. (250) 564-1883
Fax. (250) 564-1866

File attachments
2007-07-16 Close Calll Involving Tie Rod Braking.pdf

Marine Fatality and Two Serious Injuries

Location: 
Jervis Inlet
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-03-21
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On March 21, 2007 a 27-foot aluminum crew boat was engaged in supporting logging operations, including supplying fuel to a boom boat in Jervis Inlet, BC. At the end of the working day the crew boat picked up the operator of the boom boat, who had accidentally fallen into the water, with the intention of returning to the logging camp. At approximately 21:30, the crew boat struck a rocky shoreline at high speed in Princess Royal Reach. The momentum of the vessel was such that it came to rest among the trees along the shoreline. Of the four persons onboard, two sustained serious injuries and one died. The weather condition at the time of the incident was heavy snow with restricted visibility.

Information gathered by the Transportation Safety Board (TSB) has revealed the following safety shortcomings on the both the crew boat and the boom boat.
Crew Boat:
•The operator of the crew boat was not appropriately trained and certified;
•The crew had not taken appropriate marine emergency duty or basic marine communications training;
•Personal flotation devices on board the crew boat were not used at the time of the incident;
•Available marine VHF radios were not used effectively to seek assistance;
•The crew boat was not registered/licensed, as required by Transport Canada regulations;
•The crew boat had not been inspected by Transport Canada as required under the Small Vessel Monitoring and Inspection Program (SVMIP); and,
•The crew and passengers had been consuming alcohol on board, which does not respect the ‘no-alcohol’ policy for the logging camp.

Boom Boat:
•The boom boat had embarked on a 24 mile voyage for which it carried insufficient fuel capacity;
•The operator of the boom boat was not appropriately trained or certified;
•The boom boat was not equipped with appropriate navigation or marine communications, or survival equipment;
•The boom boat was not registered/licensed as required by Transport Canada regulations; and,
•The boom boat had not been inspected by Transport Canada as required under the SVMIP.
Relevant Regulations

Transport Canada Regulations:

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1.Ensure that operators of crew boats and boom boats are properly trained as required;
•The Small Vessel Monitoring and Inspection Program http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/CES/Small-Commercial-Vessels/SVMIP-upto...
2.Ensure that the correct safety equipment is on all crew boats and boom boats and that crews are trained in its proper use;
3.Inspect all crew boats and boom boats on a regular basis as required by Transport Canada;
4.Reinforce that the use of drugs and alcohol on the job or while operating any piece of equipment, including boats is strictly prohibited;
5.Ensure all boom boats and crew boats are appropriately equipped with functional navigation equipment, marine communications equipment and survival gear.

File attachments
2007-03-21 Marine fatility 2 serious injuries.pdf

Close Call at 100 and 200 Road Junction

Location: 
100 road towards the 113/213 junction
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-19
Company Name: 
WINTON GLOBAL.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Two pick-ups were traveling loaded at excessive speed (estimated at 80-100km/h) on the 100 road towards the 113/213 junction.
The first pick up did not stop at the “STOP” sign at km 113 and proceeded through the junction. The second pick-up did notice the pick-up coming down the 200 road at km 213 and locked up the breaks and skidding on the gravel. No radio calls were heard and it is assumed that they might not have been on the right road channel. Unfortunately no company name or VIN plate were observed and reported.
Thanks to the alertness of the driver on the 200 road an incident was avoided.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

•All road signs must be honored.
A “STOP” sign means STOP!
•Intersection or junctions must be approached with extreme care and at speed that will allow a controlled stop.
•The appropriate road channel must be used at all times. Let other traffic know where you are and which direction you travel] especially at road junctions and inter sections.
•At no time is “Excessive speed” permitted.

File attachments
2007-09-19 Close Call at 100 and 200 Road Junction.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
18 Km George Creek (SW of Kamloops)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-20
Company Name: 
Spectrum Forestry Consulting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Between 8:00-8:30 AM - 2 persons (Silv. Surveyors) in a pick-up truck heading up (empty) George Creek F.S.R. met a low bed on a corner at or near 18 km. The low bed was coming down empty and was not using a 2-way radio. Fortunately, the pick-up was taking the corner wide on the outside and was able to avoid collision. The low bed was moving very fast and the trailer tires went into the inside corner ditch line. The miss was by inches!
The low bed operator did not stop to ensure the pick-up did not go off the road, nor did the low bed operator respond to the repeated 2-way radio hails. There are 2 channels used in the area and both channels were used to hail the low bed operator.
An investigation is ongoing to identify the low bed operator. No identification of the low bed was made by the occupants of the pick-up, as they were concentrating on avoidance.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

All industry users of forest service roads to be equipped and knowledgeable in the use of 2-way radios.
In the event a 2-way radio is not available the prime contractor dispatches a pilot vehicle.
All users of the forest service road should be driving expecting someone to be around the corner – whether industrial or recreational. Monitoring speed and lane position on the road.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Fred Usselman, RFT, ATE
Spectrum Forestry Consulting Ltd.
(250) 545-3782

File attachments
2007-09-20 Close Call With Low Bed Truck.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Dog Creek FSR, Fort St. James
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-10
Company Name: 
Kim Forest Management
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Employee was driving down the FSR and came upon a rough section of road with a berm down the middle. Employee failed to keep the pickup on the edge of the road and ended up straddling the berm. As the pickup continued, it struck a large rock and displaced the driveshaft, rendering the vehicle immobile.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Get out and check these rough sections of road, and if possible remove hazards or pick your routes carefully. Be sure to take time and drive slowly.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Ryan Giesbrecht, Kim Forest Management @ 564-3808

File attachments
2007-09-10 Truck Hits Berm Rendering the Vechile Immobile.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Binta FSR
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-23
Company Name: 
North Aspect Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Common flat tire was changed. The next morning the lug nuts were re-torque. That night while driving to another location for work, the convoy of vehicles stopped for a break. Bill noticed the lugs were loose and in some cases almost off! The lugs were re-torque and no injury occurred.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

After a flat tire the lugs need to be checked often, not just visual, but with a tire iron!

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Nick Hawes 250-562-3835

File attachments
2007-09-23 Loose Lug Nuts result in Close Call.pdf

SAFETY HAZARD ALERT

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-07
Company Name: 
WESTLINE HARVESTING LTD.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On September 7, 2007 a mechanic was attempting to service the brakes on one rear wheel of a logging truck. The tractor was hooked up to the trailer, with the tractor brakes released and the trailer brakes applied. The rear axle of the tractor was being jacked up. The tractor unit rolled slightly (shop floor slope and play in the fifth wheel), causing the jack to tilt and become unstable. The mechanic noticed the jack movement, lowered the jack, blocked the front wheels with chock blocks and re-jacked the rear axle. Fortunately no damage or injuries occurred.
This incident could have resulted in injury had the mechanic not noticed the tilting jack, and the jack kicked out on the mechanic.

ROOT CAUSES:
-Failure to follow Procedure/Policy/Practice (worker did not chock / block wheels prior to repair).
-Inadequate assessment of needs, risks and/or hazards (worker relied on trailer brakes to restrain tractor and did not recognize the potential hazard of the shop floor slope and fifth wheel play on the stability of the jack).

Learnings and Suggestions: 

-Chock / Block wheels on all vehicles and mobile equipment prior to repairs.
-Follow established Procedures.

File attachments
2007-09-07 Close Call Involving Jack.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Geographic Area Identified as Blaeberry River located in the Golden TSA
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-29
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Worker was driving a pick up truck out of the bush on a forestry road. The driver was negotiating a corner when the vehicle started to slide sideways. The vehicle slid off the road into a ditch. The worker was not injured.

The road conditions at the time of the incident were considered poor. The vehicle was traveling at approximately 30 km / hour prior to sliding off the road. The trucks’ tires may have not been appropriate for the conditions. This geographic area is in transition to winter.

A combination of speed and traction, for the road condition, appears to be the contributing factors to this incident.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Worker (driver) is responsible to judge the road and conditions and operate the vehicle in a safe manner. Drive within “safe speeds” with regards to unsafe road conditions, anticipated traffic, and weather conditions such as snow, ice, speed, mud, dust, general visibility, and “vehicle capabilities (i.e. tires)”. Conditions can change fast; therefore driver must drive according to the conditions. Do not overdrive the road conditions or the vehicles’ capability. Forest roads are subject to continuous changes due to weather, surfacing materials, traffic volume, and traffic flow. Worker must adhere to Contractors’ Safety Program procedures associated with driving on forestry roads.

Communicate the identified hazard.

The worker should have alerted other potential road users (via radio) of his/her situation and location to prevent any further potential incidents from occurring.

File attachments
2007-10-29 Winter Conditions Cause Truck to Leave Road.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Geographic Area Identified as Blaeberry River located in the Golden TSA
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-19
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The worker was driving a pick up truck out of the bush on a forestry road. The driver was attempting to negotiate a corner when the pick up truck started to slide. The worker tried to steer the vehicle but it continued to travel straight. The driver applied the brakes but the truck continued to slide for approximately 80ft before going off the road and hitting a tree in the ditch. The worker was not injured.

During the morning of the incident, the driving conditions were good. The vehicle was traveling at approximately 55 to 60 km / hour prior to attempting to negotiate the corner under slippery conditions. This geographic area is in transition to winter.

Excessive speed for the road conditions appears to be the main contributing factor to this incident.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Worker (driver) is responsible to judge the road and conditions and operate the vehicle in a safe manner. Drive within “safe speeds” with regards to unsafe road conditions, anticipated traffic, and weather conditions such as snow, ice, speed, mud, dust, general visibility, and “vehicle capabilities (i.e. tires)”. Conditions can change fast; therefore driver must drive according to the conditions. Do not overdrive the road conditions or the vehicles’ capability. Forest roads are subject to continuous changes due to weather, surfacing materials, traffic volume, and traffic flow. Worker must adhere to Contractors’ Safety Program procedures associated with driving on forestry roads.

Communicate the identified hazard.

The worker should have alerted other potential road users (via radio) of his/her situation and location to prevent any further potential incidents from occurring.

File attachments
2007-10-19 Truck Slides Off Road and Hits Tree.pdf

ROAD SAFETY HAZARD ALERT

Location: 
225 km on the Lakeland 200 Rd.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-02
Company Name: 
Canfor Woodlands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On Friday November 2, 2007 at approximately 6:10 pm, a Canfor PG Woodlands staff member rolled his pickup truck at 225 km on the Lakeland 200 Rd. Thankfully due to the employee wearing his seatbelt, no injuries resulted from the truck rollover. The employee involved in the incident has an excellent driving record, with no previous accidents on the logging roads. He is also one of PG Woodlands most experienced logging road drivers.

Details of Incident:
The employee had the pickup in four-wheel drive due to the road conditions and was driving at approximately 60 km/hr. Employee entered a corner on the logging road and estimates he entered the corner between 50 and 60K/hr, the pickup then started to drift across the road. Employee let off the gas to let the pickup coast around the corner, this is when the back of the pickup started to kick out. Being in four wheel drive, the employee tried to add some gas to correct the slide. The front tire on the passenger side caught the snow and caused the rear of the truck to come completely around. Vehicle went over the shoulder of the road and into the ditch backwards and sideways to the original direction of travel. The drivers side tires sunk into the soft ground and pickup went over the bank (the ditch was approximately 1.5 – 2m below the road grade) and then rolled over completely and then ended back onto its tires. The tires on the pick up truck were brand new, but tires were not studded. Employee was traveling at the posted speed limit for the logging road.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

The Prince George Woodlands Safety Committee would like to share some key learnings/messages from this incident with the goal to prevent a reoccurrence of similar incident in the future:
1.All employees must continually assess road and weather conditions and adjust their speed of travel. Key winter hazards to be aware of are: freezing rain, heavy snow, slippery compacted roads, narrow roads, high snowbanks, blowing snow, etc. Employees need to adjust their speeds when adverse weather and road conditions exist, this may necessitate traveling at slower than posted speed limits.
2.All employees should immediately check their tires to ensure adequate for travel on winter logging roads. Employees who spend a considerable amount of time driving on logging roads should consider the use of studded tires to improve traction and stopping ability.
3.During extreme adverse road conditions, all employees need to assess the necessity to be on the logging roads that day. Employees are encouraged to postpone or reschedule activities until adverse road conditions are addressed by road maintenance equipment.
4.All employees need to continue to wear seatbelts at all times. This incident clearly reinforces why they need to be worn at all times. Seatbelts save lives and prevent serious injuries from occurring.

File attachments
2007-11-02 Pickup Truck Hits the Ditch.pdf
« first‹ previous919293949596979899next ›last »
Careers | Contact Us | Top | Privacy Statement | Terms and Conditions |
Copyright © 2006-2018 BC Forest Safety Council. All rights reserved.
|