BC Forest Safety Council | Safety is good business



Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Dog Creek FSR, Fort St. James
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-10
Company Name: 
Kim Forest Management
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Employee was driving down the FSR and came upon a rough section of road with a berm down the middle. Employee failed to keep the pickup on the edge of the road and ended up straddling the berm. As the pickup continued, it struck a large rock and displaced the driveshaft, rendering the vehicle immobile.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Get out and check these rough sections of road, and if possible remove hazards or pick your routes carefully. Be sure to take time and drive slowly.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Ryan Giesbrecht, Kim Forest Management @ 564-3808

File attachments
2007-09-10 Truck Hits Berm Rendering the Vechile Immobile.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Binta FSR
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-23
Company Name: 
North Aspect Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Common flat tire was changed. The next morning the lug nuts were re-torque. That night while driving to another location for work, the convoy of vehicles stopped for a break. Bill noticed the lugs were loose and in some cases almost off! The lugs were re-torque and no injury occurred.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

After a flat tire the lugs need to be checked often, not just visual, but with a tire iron!

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Nick Hawes 250-562-3835

File attachments
2007-09-23 Loose Lug Nuts result in Close Call.pdf

SAFETY HAZARD ALERT

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-07
Company Name: 
WESTLINE HARVESTING LTD.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On September 7, 2007 a mechanic was attempting to service the brakes on one rear wheel of a logging truck. The tractor was hooked up to the trailer, with the tractor brakes released and the trailer brakes applied. The rear axle of the tractor was being jacked up. The tractor unit rolled slightly (shop floor slope and play in the fifth wheel), causing the jack to tilt and become unstable. The mechanic noticed the jack movement, lowered the jack, blocked the front wheels with chock blocks and re-jacked the rear axle. Fortunately no damage or injuries occurred.
This incident could have resulted in injury had the mechanic not noticed the tilting jack, and the jack kicked out on the mechanic.

ROOT CAUSES:
-Failure to follow Procedure/Policy/Practice (worker did not chock / block wheels prior to repair).
-Inadequate assessment of needs, risks and/or hazards (worker relied on trailer brakes to restrain tractor and did not recognize the potential hazard of the shop floor slope and fifth wheel play on the stability of the jack).

Learnings and Suggestions: 

-Chock / Block wheels on all vehicles and mobile equipment prior to repairs.
-Follow established Procedures.

File attachments
2007-09-07 Close Call Involving Jack.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Geographic Area Identified as Blaeberry River located in the Golden TSA
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-29
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Worker was driving a pick up truck out of the bush on a forestry road. The driver was negotiating a corner when the vehicle started to slide sideways. The vehicle slid off the road into a ditch. The worker was not injured.

The road conditions at the time of the incident were considered poor. The vehicle was traveling at approximately 30 km / hour prior to sliding off the road. The trucks’ tires may have not been appropriate for the conditions. This geographic area is in transition to winter.

A combination of speed and traction, for the road condition, appears to be the contributing factors to this incident.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Worker (driver) is responsible to judge the road and conditions and operate the vehicle in a safe manner. Drive within “safe speeds” with regards to unsafe road conditions, anticipated traffic, and weather conditions such as snow, ice, speed, mud, dust, general visibility, and “vehicle capabilities (i.e. tires)”. Conditions can change fast; therefore driver must drive according to the conditions. Do not overdrive the road conditions or the vehicles’ capability. Forest roads are subject to continuous changes due to weather, surfacing materials, traffic volume, and traffic flow. Worker must adhere to Contractors’ Safety Program procedures associated with driving on forestry roads.

Communicate the identified hazard.

The worker should have alerted other potential road users (via radio) of his/her situation and location to prevent any further potential incidents from occurring.

File attachments
2007-10-29 Winter Conditions Cause Truck to Leave Road.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Geographic Area Identified as Blaeberry River located in the Golden TSA
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-19
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The worker was driving a pick up truck out of the bush on a forestry road. The driver was attempting to negotiate a corner when the pick up truck started to slide. The worker tried to steer the vehicle but it continued to travel straight. The driver applied the brakes but the truck continued to slide for approximately 80ft before going off the road and hitting a tree in the ditch. The worker was not injured.

During the morning of the incident, the driving conditions were good. The vehicle was traveling at approximately 55 to 60 km / hour prior to attempting to negotiate the corner under slippery conditions. This geographic area is in transition to winter.

Excessive speed for the road conditions appears to be the main contributing factor to this incident.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Worker (driver) is responsible to judge the road and conditions and operate the vehicle in a safe manner. Drive within “safe speeds” with regards to unsafe road conditions, anticipated traffic, and weather conditions such as snow, ice, speed, mud, dust, general visibility, and “vehicle capabilities (i.e. tires)”. Conditions can change fast; therefore driver must drive according to the conditions. Do not overdrive the road conditions or the vehicles’ capability. Forest roads are subject to continuous changes due to weather, surfacing materials, traffic volume, and traffic flow. Worker must adhere to Contractors’ Safety Program procedures associated with driving on forestry roads.

Communicate the identified hazard.

The worker should have alerted other potential road users (via radio) of his/her situation and location to prevent any further potential incidents from occurring.

File attachments
2007-10-19 Truck Slides Off Road and Hits Tree.pdf

ROAD SAFETY HAZARD ALERT

Location: 
225 km on the Lakeland 200 Rd.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-02
Company Name: 
Canfor Woodlands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On Friday November 2, 2007 at approximately 6:10 pm, a Canfor PG Woodlands staff member rolled his pickup truck at 225 km on the Lakeland 200 Rd. Thankfully due to the employee wearing his seatbelt, no injuries resulted from the truck rollover. The employee involved in the incident has an excellent driving record, with no previous accidents on the logging roads. He is also one of PG Woodlands most experienced logging road drivers.

Details of Incident:
The employee had the pickup in four-wheel drive due to the road conditions and was driving at approximately 60 km/hr. Employee entered a corner on the logging road and estimates he entered the corner between 50 and 60K/hr, the pickup then started to drift across the road. Employee let off the gas to let the pickup coast around the corner, this is when the back of the pickup started to kick out. Being in four wheel drive, the employee tried to add some gas to correct the slide. The front tire on the passenger side caught the snow and caused the rear of the truck to come completely around. Vehicle went over the shoulder of the road and into the ditch backwards and sideways to the original direction of travel. The drivers side tires sunk into the soft ground and pickup went over the bank (the ditch was approximately 1.5 – 2m below the road grade) and then rolled over completely and then ended back onto its tires. The tires on the pick up truck were brand new, but tires were not studded. Employee was traveling at the posted speed limit for the logging road.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

The Prince George Woodlands Safety Committee would like to share some key learnings/messages from this incident with the goal to prevent a reoccurrence of similar incident in the future:
1.All employees must continually assess road and weather conditions and adjust their speed of travel. Key winter hazards to be aware of are: freezing rain, heavy snow, slippery compacted roads, narrow roads, high snowbanks, blowing snow, etc. Employees need to adjust their speeds when adverse weather and road conditions exist, this may necessitate traveling at slower than posted speed limits.
2.All employees should immediately check their tires to ensure adequate for travel on winter logging roads. Employees who spend a considerable amount of time driving on logging roads should consider the use of studded tires to improve traction and stopping ability.
3.During extreme adverse road conditions, all employees need to assess the necessity to be on the logging roads that day. Employees are encouraged to postpone or reschedule activities until adverse road conditions are addressed by road maintenance equipment.
4.All employees need to continue to wear seatbelts at all times. This incident clearly reinforces why they need to be worn at all times. Seatbelts save lives and prevent serious injuries from occurring.

File attachments
2007-11-02 Pickup Truck Hits the Ditch.pdf

Vehicle Rollover

Location: 
Peace Liard Woodlands
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-05
Company Name: 
Canfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On November 5, 2007 a Canfor staff member was enroute to Prince George from Fort St. John for work purposes. During travel, the employee encountered poor weather and deteriorating driving conditions (current snow fall, just below zero temperatures, slippery/snow packed road surfaces and reduced visibility) when reaching Mount Lemoray, after traveling for approximately three hours, the staff member assessed the worsening road/weather conditions and made the decision to turn around and return to Fort St. John. Once in cell phone range, the staff member notified the Fort St John office that they were returning. At approximately 1:00 p.m., while traveling on a straight stretch of Highway 97 approximately 10 kilometers east of Groundbirch, (the staff member reports driving at 70km/per hour due to road conditions) the vehicle hit a patch of ice, swerved to the right and then swerved to the left, and then began spinning in circles down the middle of the highway. The vehicle hit the ditch, rolled over once and then rolled again landing on the roof. The staff member was able to climb out of the truck through the driver side window and summon assistance from oncoming traffic. Thankfully as a result of the staff member wearing a seat belt only minor injuries (bruising and soft tissue) were sustained.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1.All employees need to continue to wear seatbelts at all times. This incident clearly reinforces why they need to be worn at all times. Seatbelts save lives and prevent serious injuries from occurring.
2.Winter driving is a tricky and can be a dangerous business. Better roads, better cars and better tires won’t take the place of careful driving practices. All employees must continually assess road and weather conditions and adjust their speed of travel. Key winter hazards to be aware of are: freezing rain, heavy/blowing snow, slippery compacted roads and poor visibility. Even once a risk assessment is performed, when driving in poor winter conditions, employees need to continuously assess adverse weather and road conditions and are reminded that sudden changes may occur and vehicle reaction time is extremely reduced in poor weather/road conditions.
3.
Make sure that vehicles are equipped with a good winter driving tires and check tire pressure prior to traveling, also make sure that your vehicle is equipped with a winter survival kit.
4.Assess your travel plans, if travel can be avoided during times of poor winter weather, make alternate arrangements. Remember that your safety requires you to exercise good judgment at all times. If you must travel give yourself plenty of extra time for getting to your destination. Speed limits are for perfect, dry conditions. On winter’s icy roadways, reducing your speed to half the speed limit may not be enough.
5.If extreme driving conditions are encountered, pulling over in a safe area and waiting for conditions to improve (plowing, sanding, snow melting and or snow fall ceasing) should also be considered.

File attachments
2007-11-05 Icy Roads to blame for Vechile Rollover.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Chilliwack River Road
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-29
Company Name: 
Chartwell Consultants Ltd. / B. A. Blackwell and Associates
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Driving east on Chilliwack River Road, approximately 1 km from the turn off of Vedder Road. Truck was proceeding at the speed limit (60km/h) around a gentle corner when they hit black ice and started to fishtail. The driver tried to steer out of the skid, but the truck skidded across the center line and ended up in the ditch on the opposite side of the road. The truck almost completely rolled over and ended up on its side (driver side down).

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Ensure that all employees are aware of winter driving procedures (see attached). Encourage employees to slow down if they think that there is a possibility of black ice or slick driving conditions. Ensure that all employees are checking the weather and temperature prior to heading out in the morning and knowing what the conditions are supposed to be for their drive home as well. Consider driver training if the above procedures seem inadequate for area that employees will be driving in. Ensure pre-trip inspections are being conducted and hazards are identified (e.g. equipment or vehicular deficiencies).

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Jessica McDonald; Chartwell Consultants Ltd. – 604-980-5061
Kyle Broome; B. A. Blackwell and Associates – 604-986-8346

File attachments
2007-11-29 Black Ice Results in Truck Hitting Ditch.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Campbell River
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-01-30
Company Name: 
Strathcona Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Drill swamper was retrieving the drill hole cones from the front of the tank drill where they had been placed as the operator continued to drill. The drill hammer hose ruptured at the fitting where it leaves the machine and blew off the fitting taking the whip check with it. The whip check, a device utilized to prevent the “fly-away” behaviour of air lines under pressure was improperly anchored and did not function. The drill swamper’s hard hat was struck by the whip check as it was propelled thru the air before coming to rest. This was a close call incident with no injury to workers.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1) Drill crews to ensure correct placement of whip checks during prework inspections.
2) Anchor points must be visible, allowing for visual inspections by drill crews as well as maintenance personnel.
3) Drill crews to perform routine tug test on whip check to confirm security of attachment.
4) Suspect whip checks must be replaced or repositioned prior to commencement of work.
5) All workers to be aware of the potential hazards of working in close proximity to high pressure air lines.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Strathcona Contracting Ltd.

File attachments
2007-01-30 drill swapper close call.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Location: 
Campbell River, B.C.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-04-28
Company Name: 
Strathcona Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Drill swamper was using a sledge hammer to hammer loose a coupling from a broken 10-foot drill steel. The drill steel and attached coupler were placed on the ground to provide for a solid base. The employee was somewhat hurried in his actions in that he wanted to have the coupler freed by the time the driller had completed his current length of steel. The employee removed his safety glasses to provide a clearer view of the object(s) he was trying to hammer loose. Upon hitting the steel and coupling with the sledge hammer, a piece of rock was dislodged from beneath or alongside the steel and struck the employee in the right eye. The employee was taken to the Campbell River District Hospital for assessment and further treatment, as req’d. This incident became a lost time injury as the employee suffered lacerations to the cornea. The employee returned to work the following week.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1.)Employees reminded of their responsibilities for maintaining PPE in good condition and for requesting replacement when necessary.
2.)Employees reminded to wear appropriate PPE when conducting work activities for the Company. This policy is not optional.
3.)Company supervisors to inspect condition of PPE during site inspections and replace as required.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Strathcona Contracting Ltd.

File attachments
2007-04-28 Wear your PPE.pdf
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