Snowmobile Loading Close Call

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
Beaton Arm (near Nakusp, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-02-10
Company Name: 
Downie Timber Ltd. - Woodlands Division
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Two snowmobiles were securely loaded onto a sled deck on the back of a pick-up truck.

Upon arrival at the unloading site the sled ramp was pulled out roughly 10 feet and the machines were untied for unloading.

When the operator of the Arctic Cat attempted to unload the machine, the right ski slipped off the ramp causing the sled to roll slowly onto its side. The sled may not have been adequately aligned with the ramp.

The operator was not pinned or injured but did require assistance to right the sled.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Snowmobile transport set ups can vary between vehicles. If you are inexperienced at loading/unloading seek training or coaching.
  • If you are with someone inexperienced, help and instruct them on safe loading and unloading procedures, or do the unload yourself.
  • Review your companies SWP’s to ensure they include procedures for loading and loading snowmobiles and all-terrain vehicles.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Downie Timber Ltd. - Woodlands Division (250) 837-2222

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Downie_Timber_2016-2-10_Snowmobile_unloading_incident.pdf

Fire at MDF Mill in Quesnel

Safety Alert Type: 
Manufacturing
Location: 
WestPine Medium Density Fibreboard (Quesnel, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-03-09
Company Name: 
West Fraser Mills Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On the evening of Wednesday March 9, a process-related upset condition led to a fire at the WestPine MDF (medium density fibreboard) mill in Quesnel.

Employees acted quickly, the mill was evacuated and no one was injured. Emergency crews responded and were able to bring the fire under control within a few hours.

The fire has caused damage and the facility will not be operational for a period of time.

WestPine MDF is owned and operated by West Fraser Mills Ltd.

Additional Information:

  • At approximately 5:30pm on March 9th a fire occurred in the process equipment of WestPine MDF, resulting in a fire at the facility.
  • There were no injuries. All personnel on site were accounted for and safe.
  • Fire detection systems were in place at the mill.
  • Employees were able to engage the facility’s fire suppression system and the mill’s emergency evacuation procedures were activated immediately.
  • WorkSafeBC and West Fraser Mills are conducting investigations to understand the circumstances of the incident.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Resources: Although the details of this incident are still unknown, review the following general safety information:

 

File attachments
Westpine MDF Explosion Alert.pdf

Backing manoeuvre results in loaded rock truck leaving road & upside down

Safety Alert Type: 
Road Building/Deactivation
Location: 
Nootka Island
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-02-24
Company Name: 
Strathcona Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The driver of an articulated rock truck was hauling talus rock from a pit location, following loading by an excavator. Because the haul distance was very short, the truck was backing up to dump loads. Although previous trips had been completed that day, this was the first load to be hauled from this particular direction. Road grade and width were not an issue at this location and, although the road alignment featured a slight curve, it was not significant.

The rock truck driver was backing up using only the drivers’ side mirror until he noticed the truck was edging away from the ditch line. He turned his head to check the outside mirror but by this time it was too late, as the truck box was already going over the bank. To this point, the truck had backed up less than 37 metres from his loading point at the excavator.

The box of the truck continued over the fill slope, rolling over as it went. This caused the cab of the truck to follow, but in a more abrupt manner as it attempted to “catch up” to the angle of the box. The entire truck came to rest upside down, only prevented from rolling further down the slope by the presence of a large cedar tree (see photos in attached pdf).

The rock truck driver sustained a cracked rib, bruising and concussion. The driver reported that he was wearing his seatbelt.

Damage assessment of the truck continues to determine if further repairs are needed beyond some cosmetic body damage and broken glass.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1) Prior to moving equipment initially, the operator should capture a mental picture of the worksite and become familiar with their surroundings, taking note of any items of particular interest, such as:

  • Road width and alignment
  • Grades
  • Potential soft shoulders and/or narrow shoulders
  • Estimated distances to locations of concern (culvert crossings, pullout locations, etc)

2) An obvious recommendation is to check behind using BOTH mirrors PRIOR to backing up

3) Use both mirrors WHILE backing up.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Strathcona Contracting Ltd. (250) 286-1148

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Strathcona Contracting Ltd_2016-2-24.pdf

Feller Buncher runaway on steep slope

Safety Alert Type: 
Mechanical Tree Falling
Location: 
Grand Forks (Knappen Gulch worksite)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-01-15
Company Name: 
Lime Creek Logging Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

While working on a slope in excess of 35 per cent, a hydraulic failure occurred causing a Feller Buncher to freewheel out of control for about 20 metres to the bottom of the slope (see photo in attached pdf).

Both travel motors failed at the same time causing this to happen. The buncher was operating in high range due to the inconsistent nature of the slope which ranged from 0-50%.

This hydraulic failure issue has occurred before to others with similar machines.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • While cutting on slope in excess of 35 per cent, machines must be operated in LOW range. If left in HIGH range it is possible the machine could run away unexpectedly.
  • Follow operators manual.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Shawn McIver, Lime Creek Logging Operations lcl.shawn@outlook.com

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Lime_Creek_Logging_2016-1-15.pdf

CLOSE CALL: Loaded log truck fails to steer around corner on snowy, slippery road

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
2km Soards FSR – Near Mica Creek (north of Revelstoke)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-12-11
Company Name: 
Downie Timber Ltd. - Woodlands Division
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A loaded logging trucking was leaving the bush and failed to steer around a switchback. The steering axle of the truck went through the snow berm on the outside of the switchback, resulting in the truck getting stuck. There was no damage to the truck and no injuries resulted from this close call.

Road conditions were snowy and slippery at the time of the incident. The grader operator pulled the truck backwards roughly 20 feet so the truck driver could place a steering chain on and continue down the road.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

During adverse conditions in winter storm cycles, drivers should be doing risk assessments and chaining up when road conditions are unfavorable. Licensees should have roads graded and salted (weather conditions permitting) where necessary ahead of trucks.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Downie Timber Ltd. - Woodlands Division (250) 837-2222

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Downie_Timber_2015-12-11.pdf

HAZARD ALERT : Inadequate Eye Protection

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
Work sites throughout British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-01-16
Company Name: 
Interfor (Adams Lake Division)
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Workers have sustained eye injuries due to inadequate eye protection, or by not wearing any eye protection.

Wear eye protection anytime there is a risk of getting struck by an object or getting something in the eye. In forestry work, this can mean dust, dirt, branches, wood chips, liquid chemicals or welding flash.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

 

Tips for Safety Glasses:

  • Glasses must be impact resistant (CSA/ANSI, “+”). Regular sunglasses or reading glasses do not offer the same protection.
  • Eye protection must meet the specific job requirements, eg: welder’s helmet.
  • Choose glasses that fit face and wrap around for side protection.
  • Always keep safety glasses readily available.
  • Protect the lenses from scratches and replace them when lenses get marked up.
  • Those with prescriptions can use safety glasses that fit over prescription glasses, or can use a face shield or visor. See optometrist for options.
  • Use vented or anti-fog glasses or treat with anti-fog solution.
  • Choose glasses with foam padding across brow.
  • Use tinted CSA/ANSI glasses for bright sun or glare.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Lana Kurz, RPF - Interfor (Adams Lake Division) Lana.Kurz@Interfor.com (250) 679-6838

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-EyeProtection_Jan_15-2016.pdf

SERIOUS INCIDENT : Gunfire in forest endangers field worker

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
Swift Creek FSR (near Squamish, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-11-11
Company Name: 
Infinity-Pacific Stewardship Group
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Worker was traversing boundary changes in a proposed cut-block. He was working alone and checking in every hour with the Safety Check-in via cell phone. He was removing an old boundary line working toward his truck, which was less than 50 metres away, parked on the Swift Creek Forestry Service road.

A shot was fired and he heard the bullet whiz by him. He immediately started yelling at the unknown shooter(s) and ran to the road. Once at roadside, the worker started walking toward the shooter(s) truck but it sped away, heading further up the FSR.

Worker could not get a licence plate number on the truck but immediately called his direct supervisor and informed him of the situation. Supervisor stated he had the right to refuse unsafe work if he felt uncomfortable with continuing his duties. Worker took his lunchbreak to see if the shooters(s) would come back but nothing happened. He decided it was safe to continue and finished the task for the day.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Although the worker could not record the licence plate number because the truck was in motion, he gathered a description of the truck. However, the description was not enough for the police to investigate the incident further.

The police suggested that the employee / supervisor should have immediately dialed 9-1-1 to dispatch police to investigate and possibly locate the shooter(s) closer to the time of the incident.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Infinity-Pacific Stewardship Group Krys Stec, Safety Coordinator (604) 870-1191

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Infinity-Pacific_2015-11-11.pdf

Wheels lock up on icy road, crew truck slides to a “soft landing” in snow-filled ditch

Safety Alert Type: 
Crew Transport (land, water, air)
Location: 
Kenney Dam Road – Vanderhoof, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-01-05
Company Name: 
Ponderosa Forestry Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Cruising crews finished work for the day at 4:00 p.m. While the two sleds were being loaded and the truck was warming up, the driver cleared the recent snow off the windshield (1-2cm).

Once everything was loaded and secured on the flat deck, the crew got into the vehicle while still wearing their rain gear and boots as they were chilled from the sled ride and it was a short 30 minute drive back to town.

The truck entered the main public road and drove a short distance (1,000m) when the windshield started fogging up. The driver removed a file folder from the dash thinking it was obstructing the heat flow, when the entire windshield became frosted and unable to see out of.

The driver applied the brakes (approximate vehicle speed of 40 km/h) but the wheels locked up on the ice and the vehicle gradually entered the right hand ditch, coming to rest at a 45 degree angle.

Previous freezing rain and snow accumulation of 30cm made for unusually poor road conditions. The large amount of snow in the ditch softened the impact for both the vehicle and the passengers. No vehicle damage or personal injury occurred.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Before a crew vehicle leaves a worksite ensure all snow / ice is removed from the windshield and all other glass, mirrors and external marker lights
  • Snow must be fully removed from the hood, grill, front bumper and especially the roof, as it may quickly slide onto the windshield, obstructing the driver
  • Don’t drive a vehicle until there is sufficient cab heat to fully defrost the windshield. Keep on full defrost mode until it is safe to switch to a mix of floor / defrost
  • Ensure there are no large objects on the dash that may obstruct heat flow.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Dean Toll, Ponderosa Forestry Ltd. (250) 567-2469

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Ponderosa_Forestry_2015-Jan-05.pdf

Close Call: Lunch break triggers severe food allergy

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
Williams Lake area
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-12-10
Company Name: 
Kennedy Forest & Safety Consultants
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A forestry worker was eating lunch in the area of Riske Creek, BC. While eating a can of cold Chunky Stew the worker started to feel the side of his neck swelling up and his hands got very itchy.

The worker recognized he may be having an allergic reaction but had never experienced symptoms this severe. The worker drove himself to a nearby store in a small First Nations community looking for Benadryl to ease the symptoms. The store did not have any but the worker eventually found a member of the small community who went home and got some Benadryl. The worker took two Benadryl tablets and the itching in his hands immediately subsided and the swelling in the neck seemed to have stopped.

The worker decided to drive the 40 kilometres to the hospital in Williams Lake. On the way, the worker started to experience swelling around his throat area and was having difficulty swallowing. The worker had a Satellite phone and called the nearest RCMP detachment who transferred his call to the local 911 ambulance service. The worker was worried about a total shut down of his airway and the ambulance was dispatched immediately to meet the worker.

The worker was pulled over with 4 way flashers on about 15 kilometers west of Williams Lake when the ambulance arrived. The worker was able to walk into the ambulance and was transported to Hospital for treatment.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Although the worker knew he had allergies to certain foods, he was always able to work through the symptoms without any issues and generally avoided those foods.
  • With the onset of the allergic reaction happening so quickly, the worker will carry a supply of Benadryl and purchase an Epi Pen to have in his First Aid kit.
  • The worker also should have had someone drive him to the hospital or stopped and waited on the highway after he made the call for help to Emergency Services. If his airway had closed and he became unconscious, he may have caused an accident or further injury.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Craig Kennedy at (250) 267-3722 or email: kennedysafety@gmail.com

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Allergic_Reaction_2015-12-10.pdf

Icy log slides off poorly-built load on steep grade

Safety Alert Type: 
Yarding and Loading
Location: 
West-Central Vancouver Island
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-11-24
Company Name: 
A.H. Green Log Hauling
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

After checking and tightening cinches, log truck driver left the landing with a load of logs covered with ice and began down a 25 per cent grade. The loaderman had not crowned off the load so the middle top logs were not restrained by the cinches.

Due to the steep grade and ice on the load, one log slid ahead and over the cab, causing extensive damage to the roof and shattered the passenger-side windshield. The driver sustained no injuries (see photos in attached pdf).

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Loaderman to be diligent in assessing the safety of loads in adverse conditions (such as ice or sap in the springtime)
  • Reminder issued to all loader operators and log truck drivers to communicate about load status before truck leaves the landing

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Tony Green, A.H. Green Log Hauling (250) 749-6570

File attachments
Safety_Alert_AH_Green_Log_Hauling_2015-11-24.pdf
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