Log Hauling Shut Down Procedures

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2015-09-29
Company Name: 
INTERFOR (Adams Lake Division)
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Introduction: Every spring and fall there will be conditions / weather events that make for extremely challenging hauling conditions.

Interfor has already introduced the Mandatory Chain-Up Procedures to reduce logging truck related incidents. These Log Hauling Shut-Down Procedures are meant to support this goal.

There are certain days where road conditions make hauling very challenging. Sometimes shutting down the log haul is the best action to the incidents.

Shut Down Criteria: There are several scenarios that could cause the shut-down of a log haul. These are the most common scenarios:

Early/Late Season Snow Events:

  • -2 to +2 degrees Celsius temperature range
  • Fresh wet snow greater than 4-6 inches accumulation or freezing rain events.
  • Grader, Sand Truck not able to keep up.

Rain Events after periods of dry on steep ground.

Extreme Wind Events with a risk of trees coming down on passing trucks

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Procedures to Shut-Down a Log Haul: If any of the listed scenarios are experienced the following steps will occur:

1. As the Loaderman travels to the block in the morning he will contact the Lead Truck via radio and communicate:

  • Any new road hazards
  • The status of the grader / sand truck
  • Weather conditions on the road.

2. Based on the information provided by the Loaderman, the Lead Truck might make the decision to try the road with his empty truck because of his skill level and additional safety precautions taken (ie: extra chains).

3. Based on personal experience to that point in the day and also on the Loaderman’s information, the Lead Truck will make a recommendation on whether or not the haul should continue. If the Lead Truck feels it should be cancelled, he is to immediately contact his Contractor Supervisor to communicate the conditions and haul status.

4. It is the Contractor Supervisor who will make the final decision on whether the haul should continue or not. This way the Lead Truck is absolved of potential peer pressure from other trucks who may want the haul to continue. *All drivers have the power and authority to stop hauling themselves if they feel unsafe or unqualified for the conditions.*

5. Once the haul has been called off:

  • ALL trucks are to be notified immediately by the Lead Truck or the Contractor Supervisor
  • The Interfor Supervisor is to be notified as soon as possible.

Interfor encourages and supports the decision of any truck driver, lead truck or contractor who chooses or recommends NOT to haul on a road due to the condition of it. Shutting down the haul due to adverse conditions could be the single most effective “Tool” in reducing the number and severity of trucking incidents that we experience in the BC Interior.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Erik Kok, RPF Operations Superintendent, Adams Lake Division erik.kok@interfor.com 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-Hauling_Shut_Down_Procedures-29-9-2015.pdf

CLOSE CALL: Worker slips, falls down bluff

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
Conuma River (near Gold River, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-09-23
Company Name: 
Ranger Forest Services Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A worker was hanging falling boundary for a helicopter harvesting cutblock in very steep and broken terrain. After approximately three hours in the timber, the worker was near the top of a rock bluff when he lost his footing and slid/fell approximately twenty metres along a 130% slope, landing on his back.

After a few minutes of recovery, the worker was able to call on the radio to his partner, who came to his aid. After the co-worker assessed him they were able to walk to the pickup truck and drive to first aid.

Along the drive, the worker felt sick and requested the truck to pull over. The worker stood at the side of the road then fainted, falling down in the ditch. The worker recovered a few moments later and was able to continue the journey to first aid.

The first aid attendant suggested the injured worker see a doctor at the hospital for a more thorough evaluation for injuries. After applying a neck brace on the worker, first aid accompanied the worker and his working partner to the hospital where the worker was evaluated by a doctor.

The doctor examined the worker with an x-ray on the worker’s elbow to check for a fracture. The x-ray was negative for fracture. The worker received an anti-inflammatory shot and was released.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Always assess your worksite for injury potential and severity, do not take risks.
  • Understand fatigue and how it can affect your judgement. Take a break and assess any questionable task or worksite.
  • Discussion with employee to review circumstance of incident and ensure more diligence in assessing risk and taking safer routes.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Sandy White (250) 202-0007 sandy@rangerforest.ca 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Ranger-Forest-Services_2016-9-23.pdf

Reminder that vehicles need to be “winter ready” as of October 1st

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
Throughout British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-10-01
Company Name: 
Government of B.C. - Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Winter weather is just around the corner and the B.C. Government’s Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure is reminding motorists that winter tire rules come into effect as of Oct. 1.

That means drivers will be required to equip their vehicles with winter tires if they plan to travel on certain highways in the North, the Interior, the South Coast (such as the Sea to Sky Highway) and Vancouver Island (such as the Malahat, Highway 14, Highway 4 and Highway 28).

“Drivers who travel on high mountain passes and designated routes where weather can suddenly change need to make sure their vehicles are winter ready,” said Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Todd Stone. “We want to be certain drivers are prepared for unpredictable and changing driving conditions. Make sure you are using winter tires that are in good condition, with solid treads, and adjusting your speed to match road and weather conditions.”

In British Columbia, winter tires are defined as those labelled with either the Mountain Snowflake symbol or the Mud and Snow (M+S) symbol.

Winter tires must be in good condition with a minimum tread depth of 3.5 mm, and must be used on designated highways Oct. 1 to March 31. Winter tires improve driving safety by providing better traction in snow, slush and icy conditions. Drivers are also reminded to check tire air pressure frequently, as it decreases in cold weather.

Commercial vehicles that are 27,000 kg gross volume weight (GVW) and greater - such as tractor trailers - are required to carry chains on the designated routes. The ministry recommends that commercial vehicle drivers keep chains onboard at all times and must be prepared to install them when conditions warrant.

Signs are posted to identify those highways where winter tires are required for lighter cars and trucks, and chains are required for heavy commercial trucks. These routes are generally located approaching high mountain passes and highways which see significant winter conditions and where conditions can change from rain to snow very quickly.

Note: Since more than 60% of B.C. motorists drive in parts of the province where snow conditions are not common, the ministry is not considering requiring all drivers to equip their vehicles with winter tires – it’s only for motorists travelling on the designated routes.

Drivers planning to travel through these designated routes are encouraged to “know before you go” and check DriveBC.ca for the latest for latest highway conditions, highway cams, route forecasts and delay information.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Quick facts:

  • Drivers who don’t have the proper winter tires on their vehicle on the designated routes can receive a fine of $121.
  • Drivers who don’t have the minimum tread depth on their tires (3.5mm) on the designated routes can receive a fine of $109.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information on:

A) Winter tire and chain requirements in B.C., go to: http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/transportation/driving-and-cycling/tra...

B) Driving preparation and tips, visit the “Shift into winter” website at: http://shiftintowinter.ca/ 

(SOURCE: This information provided through the Government of BC, Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure: https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2016TRAN0280-001797)

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Winter_Tire_Rules-Oct_1-MofT-2016.pdf

Close calls emphasize the importance of proper radio and hauling procedures

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
Leo Creek Forest Service Road (near Fort St. James)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-08-24
Company Name: 
KDL Group
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A close call was reported at the 46 km mark on the Leo Creek Forest Service Road (FSR). Two loaded trucks were travelling down and two empties and a pick up were travelling up and they met at 46 km. There are sharp curves, poor sight lines and a single lane bridge at this section of the road.

The investigation indicates that loaded calling procedures were taking place but it was unclear as to the number of loaded trucks. The first loaded truck went past the 3 empties in a pull-out and then the empties started up the FSR and had a close call with the second loaded logging truck. All vehicles were on the proper radio channel and were able to clear but it was a close call.

Over the last month there has been an increased effort by all users of the Leo Creek FSR to enforce proper radio and hauling procedures. This has been a joint effort that has had a positive impact on the overall safety of the road network. Following radio and haul road procedures are critical components of safe operations.

We must always drive to the conditions and drive as if there is someone on every corner/pinch point – not all road users have a radio.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Follow the Driving Forest Roads & Radio Procedures
  • Drive at a safe speed with headlights and taillights on. Be aware of the road conditions, drive accordingly, and obey all posted speed limits and road signs, including “Must Call” signs.
  • Area roads are “Radio Assisted and not Radio Controlled” You must drive thinking that you could meet someone around every corner or pinch point!

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

KDL Group www.kdlgroup.net

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_KDL_Group_2016-8-24.pdf

Lunch Break Fires: Be sure to properly and fully extinguish them!

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
Higher elevation forestry site
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-09-14
Company Name: 
Columbia Extreme Contracting Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On September 11th, a forestry worker on a high elevation worksite built a lunch fire, which he did not properly extinguish. There had been 6 inches of snow that morning.

Crews working on the site on September 14th smelled smoke, and found the smouldering remains of the fire. The fire was then fully extinguished, and checked again at the end of the day.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Cold, damp and even snowy conditions don’t necessarily negate the chance of forest fires.
  • Use utmost care and attention when starting any type of camp fire, any time of the year.
  • Always follow BC campfire regulations.
  • Dig down to mineral soil.
  • Clear a fire guard 1 metre x 1 metre in area to be free of fuels adjacent to the fire.
  • Have either 8 litres of water or a hand tool on site while the fire is burning.
  • Keep fire smaller than 0.5 metres x 0.5 metres.
  • Make sure the ashes of your fire are fully extinguished and cool to the touch before you leave the area.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Mark Teasdale (250) 348-2234

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Columbia_Extreme_2016-9-14.pdf

HAZARD ALERT: Diesel trucks, fuel tank vent systems, refuelling and the risk of flash fires

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-09-15
Company Name: 
WorkSafeBC
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A log transport truck quit running while driving up a steep hill on a main highway.

The driver got out to investigate the cause. While he was investigating, a flash fire occurred after he removed the diesel tank fuel cap.

The driver was seriously burned.

See the attached document from WorkSafeBC for full details.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

(See attached document)

For more information on this submitted alert: 

WorkSafeBC Prevention Information Line: 1-888-621-7233

File attachments
Safety_Alert_WorkSafeBC-Diesel_Flash_Fire_Risk-September 15-2016.pdf

Grader operators need to keep the doors closed on their machine

Safety Alert Type: 
Heavy Equipment
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-08-19
Company Name: 
Interfor (Adams Lake Division)
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

During the hot summer weather it is very important to ensure your grader’s air-conditioning unit is working.

Proper functioning AC units will allow operators to comply with the WCB regulations of keeping doors shut at ALL TIMES while in operation.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Jill pokes, branches, collisions or a machine roll-over are all hazards that can endanger operators while driving with the door open
  • Graders are NOT permitted to operate with the door open
  • Grader Owners and Supervisors play a part in ensuring this policy is adhered to by making sure AC units are functioning properly and window cleaner is available at all times.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Erik Kok, Interfor Adams Lake Division. Email: erik.kok@interfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-Adams_Lake_2016-8-19-Grader_Door.pdf

Driver Fatigue: A serious hazard!

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-08-18
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Driver fatigue played a role in two separate incidents involving an empty logging truck and a loaded logging truck.

Both were single vehicle accidents which fortunately resulted in only minor injuries. In addition, there was approximately $55,000 in damage caused.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Fatigue can be as much of a hazard as someone who is impaired by other means.

Employees should ensure they have adequate rest and hydration and are encouraged to self-report and assess their ability to perform their assigned duties.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Ron Neufeld (250) 845-8960

New weigh scale safety procedures aim to protect workers

Safety Alert Type: 
Worksites
Location: 
Grand Forks, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2016-07-20
Company Name: 
Interfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A log truck driver left the scales without following correct procedures, putting a Weighmaster at risk. Drivers must not get in their cabs when a worker is on the scales.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

A cone will be placed outside of driver’s door upon arrival (see photo in attached pdf). Driver may not move the cone or leave the scales until the Weighmaster/Scaler determines the area is clear and removes the cone.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

J. Walker Scaling Ltd. (250-574-0802) or Ron Last (778-206-4082)

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Interfor-Scale_Procedures_2016-7-20.pdf

Hazard Alert: Worker caught, seriously injured in unguarded auger

Safety Alert Type: 
Booming and Towing
Location: 
Coastal British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2014-07-03
Company Name: 
Issued by WorkSafeBC
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A worker was operating an unguarded, gas-powered auger mounted to a floating deck tied to a barge. The auger was being used to drill holes in boomsticks.

While positioning a boomstick under the auger — which was still running — the worker was exposed to the rotating auger shaft. The worker’s clothing got caught in the counterbore portion of the auger drill bit, and he became entangled in the bit. The worker sustained serious injuries.

Several factors played a role in this incident:

  • Failure to inspect or safely maintain equipment — Purchased secondhand, the auger was made operational using unmatched engine parts. As a result, the unguarded auger and transmission parts were always moving or turning while the engine was running.
  • Lack of safeguarding — Workers had direct access to the rotating drill bit because no guards or barriers prevented auger contact.
  • Lack of safe work procedures — Safe work procedures were not on site and did not address lockout.
  • Lack of supervision and training — The worker received a site orientation but no formal training or written instructions for auger use or lockout.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

 

Safe work practices:

  • Conduct risk assessments of boom augers and follow the manufacturer’s instructions on using augers safely.
  • Conduct inspections of equipment before use.
  • Ensure augers are guarded — and belts safeguarded — as required.
  • Train supervisors on auger guarding requirements.
  • Review safe work procedures with supervisors and workers before using equipment.
  • Ensure workers are fully trained before operating any equipment, even seemingly straightforward equipment.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For assistance and information on workplace health and safety, call toll-free within B.C. 1.888.621.SAFE (7233) or visit their website at worksafebc.com.

To request a copy of the complete investigation report, contact the WorkSafeBC Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy office toll-free at 1.866.266.9405.

File attachments
HazardAlert-BoomstickAuger-WorkSafeBC-June_30-2016.pdf
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