Log truck bunk straps should be closely inspected

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Nootka Island (west coast)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-11-07
Company Name: 
Nootka Sound Timber Company Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A log truck driver left the landing with a full load and proceeded downhill. As the truck rounded a switchback about 550 metres from the landing, the driver heard a noise come from the front bunk and saw part of the load spill as the bunk strap broke.

On initial inspection, the bunk strap looked to be in good shape but upon closer inspection a couple of strands at the quick-connect knob had deteriorated, causing wire to become crystallized and weakened.

A new strap was installed and the truck was reloaded.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• The toggle connection and anchor knob are weak points and require more effort to inspect, as they’re often covered in dirt and also hidden by the bunk frame. Extra time must be taken to free the strap ends and clean away dirt to visually asses wire for rust, rot and wear.

• Drivers should inspect strap daily, paying special attention to the toggle and quick-connect knob ends.

• Document these inspections on trip inspection forms and record on the time card whenever a stake strap is changed or a repair has been made.

• Share this information with all log truck drivers during tailgate/crew meetings.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Nootka Sound Timber Company Ltd. (250) 830-2292

File attachments
Log truck bunk straps should be closely inspected.pdf

Logging Truck Fatality, Log Sort Fatality, and a Fatality Reclassification

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-11-07
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Sadly, the BC Forest Safety Council has learned of a direct harvesting fatality that occurred on November 7th in the Chetwynd area.

The tractor of a loaded cut to length (CTL) logging truck went off the side of a single lane bridge. The tractor came to rest on the driver's side of the cab. The driver was found on the ground under the cab.

Updated: An investigation report has been completed and is available from WorkSafe BC at: http://www2.worksafebc.com/Topics/AccidentInvestigations/IR-Transportation.asp?ReportID=37623

A previous incident that was considered a direct harvesting fatality has recently been reclassified so the addition of the Chetwynd incident brings the total to 11 for 2013.

Also, a manufacturing fatality occurred on November 13th at a forest products manufacturing and log sorting operation in Mission. A young worker was fatally injured when struck by a bundle of logs that was being pushed into the Fraser River.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Although the causes of these incidents have not been identified, it is important for the forest industry to examine their operations and make any necessary changes to prevent similar incidents.

  • When operating vehicles or equipment it is critically important to wear seatbelts. Staying in the cab with your seatbelt on will offer the best protection if you roll-over or lose control.
  • New and young workers (under age 25) are at high risk for injuries at work. Thorough orientations, effective 2-way communication and close supervision are required to keep these workers safe.
  • Winter is here and there are new hazards to watch out for:
    • Poor visibility and increased darkness
    • Cold temperatures
    • Slippery conditions
  • Ensure there are good communications if it is necessary for a person on foot to enter an equipment operating area. The best practice is to keep equipment operations and people on the ground separated.

 

File attachments
BCFSC-20131107-FatalityAlert.pdf

Log truck slides into another, neither with driver inside

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
10km Klo Creek Rd. (Southwest of Houston, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-11-18
Company Name: 
Andy Meints Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A logging truck was being loaded when it started sliding down a slippery hill and ran into a loaded logging truck that was ahead. This caused the loaded logging truck in front to be pushed in the ditch.

Both trucks sustained damage. The logging truck that was being loaded had a damaged hood and the truck that was hit had a dented fuel tank from going into the ditch.

No one was injured. Neither of the drivers was in the trucks at this time. Both of the trucks didn’t have their trailer brakes on because if they used them they would lock up because it’s so cold.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Stay in the truck while it is being loaded in slippery conditions

• Make sure roads are properly sanded as needed

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Ashlee Meints ameintscl@telus.net or (250) 845-7319

File attachments
Log truck slides into another, neither with driver inside.pdf

Congested worksite puts rock truck, workers at risk

Safety Alert Type: 
Road Building/Deactivation
Location: 
Head of Adams Lake Rock Creek FSR (Shuswap region north of Chase, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-10-31
Company Name: 
Glenn Jackson Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A culvert was being replaced on the Rock Creek Forest Service Road.

A rock truck was hauling fill to an excavator on narrow road with a steep bank leading down into a creek. There was about 4” of fresh snow and the air temp was around 4 degrees resulting in slippery conditions.

The rock truck was backing to culvert location from the loading site approx. 200m and had to negotiate around the engineers’ pickups as well as make sure he did not get too close to the edge of the road. The worksite / dump location was too constrained, adding unnecessary difficulty to the maneuver of backing up and dumping his load on the narrow road.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

The supervisor stopped the rock truck driver and excavator operator to discuss the situation as well as measures to reduce the hazard.

A few easy solutions were:

1) Move the two pickups in the active worksite to expand the safe area for the rock truck

2) Keep rock truck away from the soft shoulder of the road

3) Plow off the snow or spill some dirt on top of the snow to add grip to the road surface

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Glenn Jackson Contracting Ltd. Jackson2@telus.net 

File attachments
Congested worksite puts rock truck, workers at risk.pdf

Close Call: Logging truck's broken reach

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Grand Forks Interfor Mill
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-10-28
Company Name: 
Interfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A loaded logging truck was parked in front of the scales waiting to approach. When the driver proceeded to pull up to the scales it became obvious the reach was broken as the back end of the trailer was on a different trajectory from the tractor.

Upon closer inspection the reach was found to be broken inside the housing. This event didn’t result in a highway accident but easily could have.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Ensure that you are performing thorough pre-trips and that mechanical inspections are completed on every truck as regularly scheduled.

Learning Point: The broken reach may or may not have been visible during a pre-trip inspection but it would be beneficial to periodically extend the reach to its full length for a thorough inspection.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Ginny Sorensen at Interfor Grand Forks Division. (250) 443-2459

File attachments
Close Call: Logging truck's broken reach.pdf

Safety Alert - Fatality - 2013-10-24

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
Near Port McNeill
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-10-24
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Tragically two direct harvesting fatalities occurred on October 24th when a float plane crashed into an island near Port McNeill. The pilot of the plane was also fatally injured in the crash.

Investigations by the Transportation Safety Board and the Coroner’s Service are still in progress and additional information will be released as it becomes available.

This incident brings the number of direct harvesting fatalities to 11 for this year. The industry experienced 10 fatalities in 2012.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Here are some recommendations to consider before taking your next flight:

  • Plan the trip well in advance and identify other transportation options. If the weather is poor or marginal for flying, consider safer options such as water or land transportation to your site.
  • Are you familiar with the aircraft’s emergency procedures if there are problems? Get a detailed pre-flight briefing before you go and consider taking an underwater egress training course.
  • Well informed and actively engaged passengers are part of the solution to reducing aircraft incidents. Help your pilot spot hazards, follow all the pilot’s directions and don’t rush when working near aircraft.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 
  1. The BC Forest Safety Council has gathered several air transportation safety resources together on our website:

    www.bcforestsafe.org/airSafetyResources

    The webpage includes an Air Carrier Standards document that is recommended reading for all companies transporting workers by air. Also included are float plane passenger guides and helicopter safety information.

  2. A report from the Coroner’s Service was released in 2011 that contains several recommendations to reduce the risks associated with float plane travel.

    http://www.pssg.gov.bc.ca/coroners/publications/docs/death-review-panel-aviation.pdf

 

File attachments
BCFSC-20131024-FatalityAlert.pdf

September 2013 - Working Safely Around Power Lines

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-08-29
Company Name: 
BCFSC
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Recently there were 3 close call incidents involving power lines that potentially could have been very serious:

  • After unloading at a mill's log sorting yard, an empty self-loading log truck loaded its trailer and drove out of the yard with the crane boom still extended. The extended boom contacted overhead service lines, which pulled down the utility pole and attached high-voltage power lines.
  • A track-mounted log processor was crossing under overhead conductors when the boom of the machine contacted a telecommunications cable. The overhead power lines were not contacted and no injuries were reported.
  • A mechanic was testing the brakes on a mobile crane when he inadvertently contacted a 25-kV overhead power line.

Recommended Preventative Actions from Fortis BC:

Remember the safe limits of approach. Electricity can arc or “jump” from the wire to a conducting object like a piece of equipment or a truck. Keep at least 3 meters distance between you and overhead distribution power lines and 6 meters for high voltage transmission lines at all times.

Look up and live. Before you start work, look up and around the site and make sure you and your crew are aware of all overhead lines. Ladders, cranes and pipes are all good conductors of electricity, and remember, it doesn’t need to be touching a power line to become energized.

A downed power line is deadly. If you spot a fallen wire, keep at least 10 meters away, even if it doesn't appear to be live. If a wire falls across your vehicle, don't get out—you could become a path for electricity if you touch the ground. If you must get out, hop out clear and land on both feet, then hop or shuffle until you are 10 meters clear of the vehicle.

Be aware of safety hazards below. Call before you dig, phone the local power company to avoid coming into contact with underground cables and service lines. The call is free, and it could save your life.

You hold their lives in your hands. Safety training is critical and as a supervisor or foreman, you hold your workers' lives in your hands. Don't put them at risk. Ensure that they have the critical safety training they need to go home safely to their families.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Dump truck spreading gravel tips onto side

Safety Alert Type: 
Road Building/Deactivation
Location: 
1 hour northwest of Prince George
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-10-16
Company Name: 
Stones Bay Holdings Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Tridem end dump operator was spreading gravel in the wee hours of the day on a road that already had a traction lift. The drivers had discussed an issue that had come up and there was a plan to spread in a different area.

This driver came to the spot where he thought he should be (off the end of the previously spread load) and raised his box to spread. As he was about to spread (box raised), he came to where the previous spread had ‘actually’ finished. It was here that he encountered a ridge of gravel.

As the truck went over the ridge, the truck rocked side to side and the driver hit the control lever to lower the box; however, it was too late and the truck went over on the passenger’s side.

Root Causes: The directions were confusing and the operator misunderstood where he was to spread his next load. This was complicated by the time of day (still dark out). The operator also neglected to dump the air from his airbags. This contributed to the truck rocking and going over onto its side.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Learnings & Follow-up: This incident was reviewed with the gravel truck operator (even though it was the last day of the gravelling season) and the Gravel Truck Procedures portion of the Company’s safety program was reviewed then too. Emphasis was placed on the importance of dumping air from airbags to help stabilize the rear of the truck while the box is raised with a load.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Darren McQueen at (250) 996-8912

File attachments
Dump truck spreading gravel tips onto side.pdf

2013-10-21

Safety Alert Type: 
Booming and Towing
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-10-21
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Fatality Alert

Sadly, the BC Forest Safety Council has learned of a direct harvesting fatality that occurred on October 21st.

This incident occurred at a cedar salvaging operation in a remote area north of Sayward. The exact cause of the injury is not known but one of worker’s jobs was bucking cedar logs. The injured worker was found by his partner who was working nearby. Unfortunately, the worker died before he could be transported to hospital.

The investigations are still in progress and additional information will be released as it becomes available.

This incident brings the number of direct harvesting fatalities to 9 for this year.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Although the causes of this incident have not been identified, it is important for the forest industry to examine their operations and make any necessary changes to prevent similar incidents.

  • Think of the worst case scenario and test your Emergency Response Plan for each new location. Do not rely on the standard plan for each area. How does it need to change if there is no road access, steep ground, poor weather or other barriers that prevent quick and safe medical evacuation?
     
  • Test your communication devices to make sure you can access emergency services. Do you have coverage for your mobile phone, satellite phone or radio? Be familiar with your location so you can give the emergency dispatcher step by step directions on how to get there.
     
  • Do not rely on one person to lead the emergency response. If the supervisor on site is injured, will the other workers know what to do? Build a team that knows what to do through regular practice of emergency procedures.
     
  • Have another look at your workplaces and identify those hazards that can lead to common forestry injuries. Here are some examples:
    1. Slips, trips and falls from elevation. Hazards: Loose bark on logs, snow and ice, jumping from the cab or tracks of machines.

       

    2. Workers being hit by trees, rocks, machinery and other objects. Hazards: Operations located directly above you on steep slopes (stacking), leaning or dead danger trees, or logs with stored energy that may be released when cut or moved.

       

    3. Muscle and joint injuries, sprains and strains. Hazards: Repetitive motions, awkward movements and improper lifting. No warm up of muscles and joints before starting work.
       

Resources:

  1. Personal Satellite Location Devices can be used to notify emergency services from
    remote locations.

    http://www.bcforestsafe.org/node/2457
     

  2. Need Ideas for Testing your Emergency Plans? Have a look at this innovation.
    http://www.bcforestsafe.org/innovations_first_aid_drills.html
     
  3. Chainsaw Training offered through the BC Forest Safety Council.
    http://www.bcforestsafe.org/basic_chainsaw
     

Click here for a pdf version of this document for printing and distribution.

File attachments
BCFSC-20131021-FatalityAlert.pdf

Log Truck Incident Update

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-10-23
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

 

Within the last 5 days, the industry has experienced an unusually high number of log truck related incidents on public highways. Here is a summary of the recent incidents and an important reminder of industry best practices for log trucks.

Recent Incidents:

  • On Saturday, Oct. 19th, a person riding a motorcycle on the Sea to Sky Highway at Whistler was fatally injured when struck by logs spilled from a logging truck.
  • On Oct. 21st, a logging truck incident occurred on the Nisga’a highway north of Terrace. The driver lost control of the truck, a guard rail was damaged, spilled some logs and some fuel entered into a stream. No injuries were reported.
  • An incident occurred on Oct. 22nd when an empty log truck left Highway 97 near Quesnel and entered the ditch. The driver was found deceased in the truck. No other vehicles were involved in this incident.
  • On Oct. 23rd, a log truck went out of control going around a corner on Highway 101 and struck a concrete barrier near Madeira Park on the Sunshine Coast. The trailer went over the barrier and into a ravine, pulling the truck with it. No injuries were reported.
  • Also on Oct. 23rd, a logging truck wound up on its side after failing to make the turn on the Squilax-Anglemont road turnoff from the Trans-Canada Highway near Chase. The driver reported that two tires on the trailer blew out just before the incident. No injuries were reported although lanes on the turnoff were blocked.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

 

All of these incidents are still under investigation and it would be premature to speculate on causes. However, it is important for the industry and drivers to pause and reassess their trucking operations to make sure all safety requirements and best practices are being met. These include:

  • Regular inspections of your rigging, tires, brakes and other components are essential to a successful day. Regulations prescribe points to inspect during your pre-trip. Of equal importance, are checks during the day – tires, wheel nuts, rigging, lights, mirrors, you know the list. Walk around the unit again while you are fuelling up and make sure everything is good to go for tomorrow. If something is wrong, get the mechanic to fix it that evening.
  • Proper load securement is key to a successful trip. Properly loaded logs and well-maintained wrappers and bunks are necessary. By law, drivers are responsible to check and confirm the load is secure at all times. Practically, that means a check when you leave the loading site, before entering the highway system, and at all other times when / if the wrappers come loose during the trip. Doing additional check stops during long trips is a best practice and required by law in some cases.
  • Overweight loads spell trouble. They increase stopping distance, impair vehicle dynamics and decrease truck stability. Consistent overloading severely taxes the ability of your equipment to reliably deliver. Overloading increases maintenance costs – not only for the truck owner, but for taxpayers (you and I) who have to invest more money in repairing our highways and bridges. Avoid overloading.
  • Fatigue is a common contributor to many Motor Vehicle Incidents. Make sure you regularly get off-duty time (at least enough to comply with Hours of Service requirements). A healthy diet and adequate hydration is a good start, but when you are feeling a little worn out, pull over and hop out for a quick walk-about (during which you can re-check your tires). A 20-minute nap can do wonders. A well-rested driver is sharper and will react faster when something goes wrong.

 

These recent incidents have the public concerned about log truck safety. The media, on behalf of the public, quite rightly is questioning if loads are secured and checked, if vehicle inspections are being done, if trucks are in good mechanical shape, if loads are within weight limits, if speed is a factor and if drivers’ hours at work are a factor. Some of the comments from the public on these stories support the progress that log truck drivers have made to improve safety, but many indicate ongoing concern.

Log truck drivers deliver over 1.5 million loads a year in BC. It only takes a handful of incidents for the public to lose confidence in our ability to keep them safe. Each load needs to be delivered safely.

File attachments
BCFSC-20131023-LogTruckIncidentUpdate.pdf
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