Tire rim explodes on skidder

Safety Alert Type: 
Heavy Equipment
Location: 
Northern Interior of BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2017-12-02
Company Name: 
D Fehr Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A skidder operator was working when suddenly he heard a loud “BOOM”. He stopped right away and got out of his machine to see what happened and discovered one of his front rims had exploded and was split in half.

The rim was installed on the skidder only days before the incident, but no obvious cracks or breaks were noticed.

Had somebody been working on the rim or tire when it exploded, it could have caused serious injuries or death.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Before working on a tire or rim always very carefully inspect rim
  • Never stand directly beside the tire when tire is being filled with air
  • Never exceed maximum air rating on tires.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Tyson von den Steinen RPF Manager, Safety & Continuous Improvement Forest Management Group, Canadian Forest Products Ltd.

Tyson.vondenSteinen@canfor.com

 

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert-D Fehr Contracting Ltd-Skidder Rim Explodes-Dec 2-2017.pdf

Log truck takes out pole, powerlines brought down onto trailer bunk

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
Northern Interior Region
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-01-09
Company Name: 
CANFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A log truck driver lost control of the truck before leaving the road, entering the ditch, and rolling over onto the driver side. The front bumper of the truck hit a power pole breaking it approximately 10 feet above the ground.

The power lines came loose from the top of the pole and remained suspended above the roadway and two lines became tangled in the log bunks.

The driver was luckily wearing a seatbelt at the time and was not injured; the driver had to break through the window in order to climb out of the truck.

Potential Hazards

  • Driving too fast for road conditions
  • Potential electrical shock due to exposure to broken powerlines that could have been still transmitting electricity
  • Fallen or broken power lines may be energized, even if they're not sparking, smoking or making a buzzing sound.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

If your vehicle contacts a power pole, follow these steps:

  • If you can safely drive away from the power pole, do so. Travel the length of a bus (10 metres or 33 feet) before stopping
  • If you can't drive the vehicle because you're injured, the vehicle is inoperable, or there are obstacles in your way - stay where you are. Do NOT get out of the vehicle unless there's an emergency, such as a fire in the vehicle

If you absolutely must exit the vehicle (e.g. because of a fire), do not to touch the vehicle and the ground at the same time with any part of your body or clothing and follow these steps:

1. Remove any loose-fitting clothing.

2. Use the handle to open the door of your vehicle.

3. Stand at the opening of your door with your elbows tucked into your stomach and your hands held close to your chest.

4. Jump out and away from the vehicle. As you exit, don't touch the door and the ground at the same time. Land with your feet together.

5. Calmly shuffle with your feet together. Keep your feet touching as you shuffle. The heel of one foot should still be touching the toe of the other when you start moving the other leg.

6. Keep shuffling until you are at least 10 metres (33 feet) or a bus-length away from the vehicle.

7. Call 911 for help.

(Information provided by BCHydro)

Follow up questions to ask workers:

1. Can you describe the procedure you would follow if you were involved in an incident and there was a broken powerline down & close by and you were trapped in the vehicle?

2. What is the height clearance of your truck when it’s loaded with logs, equipment, or materials and how do you ensure you won’t come in contact with overhanging powerlines?

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Email Tyson von den Steinen at

Tyson.VondenSteinen@canfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert-Canfor_Powerlines_Jan_9-2018.pdf

Series of mishaps occur at log yard trailer hoist, causing damage

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
BC Interior Region
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-01-02
Company Name: 
CANFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Incident Summaries

1) Jan 2nd – Trailer got stuck in hoist when it failed to stop after being lifted; fortunately the driver remained on scene and was cooperative with crews in getting the trailer down and the completing the investigation.

2) Jan 5th – Hoist pendant was activated by driver before the down contacts fused, which resulted in the cable rewinding backward back onto the spool and burning out the motor; unfortunately the driver left the scene and did not report the incident.

3) Jan 12th – Driver drove away from hoist with the hook still attached to trailer, which resulted in significant damage to the hoist (i.e., both main support beams were bent and the anchors were torn from concrete); unfortunately the driver left the scene and did not report the incident.

Potential Hazards - Not following proper safe work procedures, such as:

  • Checking for clearance before lifting trailer
  • Ensuring the trailer is completely unhooked before driving away
  • Not inspecting equipment before use and using it even though it might have been in disrepair
  • Failing to report damage to equipment before it is used again.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Equipment will be removed from service until repairs are completed and certified by engineer
  • Reminder to ALWAYS report any damage to equipment or incidents that occurred so hazards can be removed before others are exposed
  • Drivers must ALWAYS confirm that the trailer is free of the hoist before driving away. Signage will be placed at site to remind operators to always check for hook clearance
  • Remote disconnects will be installed at safer location on hoists (i.e., control side of hoist)
  • Trailer hoist inspections will be continued to be completed daily, monthly, annually, and whenever modifications are made
  • Starter contacts on hoist to be replaced annually
  • Cameras will be installed for everyone’s safety and to record activity.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Tyson von den Steinen RPF - Manager, Safety & Continuous Improvement

Forest Management Group Canadian Forest Products Ltd.

Email: Tyson.VondenSteinen@canfor.com

File attachments
Safety_Alert-Canfor-Trailer_Hoist_Jan_3-2018.pdf

Tethered machine creates a hazard for hand fallers

Safety Alert Type: 
Manual Tree Falling
Location: 
Washington State
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2017-08-31
Company Name: 
Washington State Dept. of Labour & Industries
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Two manual fallers were hired to fall trees that a tethered machine could not cut.

The fallers packed their gear to two alder trees that were to be hand felled. They assessed the situation and found it to be unsafe. The trees were brushed in and had been struck by trees felled by the tethered machine.

A large limb had broken off of one tree and was laying against the other standing tree. 

The fallers made the right choice and did not fall the trees due to the hazardous situation.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • When possible, mark out areas to be hand felled and allow the fallers to work first
  • Fall trees into the open and do not rub timber that has to be hand felled
  • If brush or timber are piled against standing timber, clean the area up for the hand fallers
  • When planning units to be felled with a tethered machine, communicate with hand fallers to ensure that they can do their work safely
  • If you see a hazardous situation, speak up! Walk away if the work can’t be done safely.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Washington State Dept. of Labour & Industries. Link to web site and PDF of this alert: https://goo.gl/DdtsZr 

Multiple Alerts: Tether Line Incidents in Winch-Assist Harvesting

Safety Alert Type: 
Winch-Assist Harvesting
Location: 
Washington State
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-01-23
Company Name: 
Washington State Dept. of Labour & Industries
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The following alerts from Washington State relate to incidents with tether lines and cables in winch-assist harvesting operations. The information can be found on the web site for the Washington State Department of Labour & Industries. A link is provided at the bottom of this page.

The following links will direct you to 3 specific alerts. PDFs are available on these pages as well:

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Washington State Dept. of Labour & Industries web page:  https://goo.gl/eNmHbe

Log Falls Off Truck on Island Highway

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Mid-Vancouver Island
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-01-10
Company Name: 
Island Timberlands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A small log (5” x 18’) was discovered on Highway 19, south of Nanaimo. There were no witnesses that saw it come off the log truck. The closest vehicle to the location was a multi bunk truck hauling similar logs.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • When hauling logs on industrial and public roads the logging truck driver has the responsibility to ensure that the load is secure. All drivers must check that their load is secure before leaving the landing. If they have concerns, the loader operator should adjust the load
  • All log truck drivers are required to stop and check their load for securement and any other issues before entering on to any public roadway
  • Use extra binders if you are not certain that your load is secure
  • Loader operators are to build crowned loads to ensure sufficient downward pressure is applied to the load from the binders
  • Loader operators should build loads as level as possible.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 
File attachments
Safety_Alert-Island_Timberlands-Log_on_Hwy_19-Jan_10-2018.pdf

Low bed booster axle moves too far, worker suffers fractured leg

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
Northern Interior Region
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2017-11-11
Company Name: 
CANFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A low bed operator attempted to disconnect the booster axle from the beavertail of a low bed trailer before disconnecting the air supply first.

The ground was frozen and icy so the booster axle slipped off and slid a greater distance than normally is the case before coming to a complete stop. The operator's leg was fractured when it got “pinched” in between the booster axle and trailer.

Potential Hazards

  • Complacency, as typically the booster axle will only slide a short distance before coming to a stop when it comes in contact with the road
  • Not following the proper safe work procedures
  • Completing work on icy ground that was not flat
  • Standing in the “line of fire” or “bight”.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Review safe work procedures with all operators:

  • Only attempt to disconnect the booster axle on level ground
  • Disconnect the air supply to the booster axle and ensure brakes have engaged before proceeding
  • Caulk wheels on booster axle to ensure it cannot slide or roll away
  • Disconnect the booster from the trailer
  • When all clear, slowly pull the tractor trailer ahead allowing the booster axle to slide off
  • Never stand in the “line of fire” and stay clear of the “bight”.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Tyson von den Steinen, RPF - Canadian Forest Products Ltd.

Email: Tyson.vondenSteinen@canfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert-Canfor-Low_bed_booster_axle_slides-Nov_11-2017.pdf

Close Call: Unloading a trailer with a loader

Safety Alert Type: 
Heavy Equipment
Location: 
West Kootenay Region
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-01-09
Company Name: 
INTERFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A loader operator was unloading the trailer off a logging truck, with the tracks parallel to the truck, on a slight inclined snow-covered loading platform.

As the machine picked up the trailer and turned, the shift in weight resulted in the loading platform failing, causing the loader to slip down the snow bank, and tip sideways onto the trailer.

The tipped loader narrowly missed a trailer stake from entering the cab. No Injuries, minor damage to trailer and loader.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • When unloading a trailer with a loader, track placement should be perpendicular to the truck to maintain proper load distribution
  • Use caulks for winter conditions on tracked equipment, to help prevent the equipment from slipping or losing traction
  • Loader operators should inspect the loading/unloading area for hazards and ensure loading platform is solid and stable
  • Prior to loading/unloading trailer, the loader operator is to instruct the truck driver to stay in the cab of the truck at all times until task has been completed. The truck driver is to wait to receive confirmation from loader operator prior to exiting the cab of the truck
  • Always wear your seatbelt while operating equipment
  • Always confirm load limit capability of equipment prior to commencing a lift.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kait Baskerville, Kootenay Operations.

Kait.Baskerville@interfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert-Interfor-Unloading_Trailer_with_Loader_January_9-2018.pdf

Concussion, torn knee ligament the result of fall from cab of log truck

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2017-10-31
Company Name: 
New Zealand Forest Owners Association
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The following information is from a member company of the New Zealand Forest Owners Association (NZFOA). The information provided has relevance to forestry operations in British Columbia as well. Link to the NZFOA alerts web page: https://nzfoa-iris.com/SafetyAlerts.aspx

After a log truck had been loaded, the driver got in the truck and drove up the road a short distance to a flat area to chain down the load. He did this to get clear of the landing and allow the yarding crew room to continue working. Where the driver stopped to chain down his load was out of sight of the crew due to an adjacent crop of younger trees.
When the driver climbed down the steps of the truck, his left foot became caught between the bottom step and the truck mudflap. The driver lost his balance and fell backwards, twisting his leg. He then hit his head on the ground and was knocked unconscious.
The driver lay there unconscious for approximately 80 minutes until the next truck driver coming along found him lying on the side of the road.

At that point the emergency response was initiated - an ambulance was dispatched, but upon arrival the ambulance crew subsequently ordered the rescue helicopter. As well as the concussion, the driver suffered a torn ligament in his knee.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Truck drivers are required to get in and out of their cabs on a regular basis every day. Some of these times will be within view of other people, and occasionally it will be when they are by themselves (for example in this situation, or when they stop at the forest entrance to check their chain tensions). The main control to avoid slips/trips/falls is for workers to use 3 points of contact when getting on and off vehicles and machinery. As an added control however, Port Blakely would also recommend that truck drivers chain down their load in view of the harvesting operation wherever possible, so that help is quickly available if required.

In addition, the following points have also come from this incident:

  • Hazards associated with vehicles and machinery, where other objects may interfere with people’s ability to safely use the steps, are to be reviewed
  • When dealing with a suspected serious injury in isolated areas, the person contacting emergency services should suggest that a rescue helicopter would be the best initial response option.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

PDF copy of this alert from New Zealand Forest Owners Association: https://nzfoa-iris.com/SafetyAlerts/ShowSafetyPDF.aspx?id=185

Falling debris hits manual tree faller

Safety Alert Type: 
Manual Tree Falling
Company Name: 
New Zealand Forest Owners Association
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The following information is from a member company of the New Zealand Forest Owners Association (NZFOA). The information provided has relevance to forestry operations in British Columbia as well. Link to the NZFOA alerts web page: https://nzfoa-iris.com/SafetyAlerts.aspx

A manual tree faller had been instructed to fall an additional strip of trees to widen a previous road lining operation. The faller was on his third tree of the day and had completed the back cut. As the tree started to go he has looked up while retreating and was struck by a falling limb to the face and shoulder.

The faller doesn’t remember the incident clearly, but fortunately he had his radio on him, the tree falling safety plan operated as it should, and he received prompt assistance from other members of the crew. He was taken to hospital and monitored for concussion while receiving stitches to the laceration to his face. The faller had been off work to recuperate following the concussion, and has since returned to work.

If the branch had been any bigger this could have resulted in very severe injuries.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Contributing factors:

  • Assessment – In this case the faller had not seen the dead, hung-up top as part of his assessment. This reinforces the need to assess each tree to look for potential hazards, and to follow the 5 STEPS correctly – Site Assessment, Tree Assessment, Escape Route, Practice Safe falling techniques, Step back and observe. Where the hazard has been identified a control for it is to be implemented.
  • Previous operations – The edge of the road lining operation had been identified as having numerous dead tops and debris hung up in the standing tree branches. It is likely that the previous road lining operation may have created some of these overhead hazards by machine felling back into the stand. Although not necessarily the cause in this instance, it could be a contributing factor.

Learnings:

  • No operation should create hazards that will effect subsequent phases / operations. Where it is possible during road lining operations, trees should not be felled back into trees that will be left standing, and any hazards that are created must be eliminated wherever possible.
  • If a hazard can’t be eliminated it must be reported, mapped, and built into the site specific hazard register for the next operation, and appropriate controls implemented.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

PDF copy of this alert from New Zealand Forest Owners Association: https://nzfoa-iris.com/SafetyAlerts/ShowSafetyPDF.aspx?id=191

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