Load of logs spills on busy public road but no cars hit

Safety Alert Type: 
Paved Roads
Location: 
Penticton, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-12-23
Company Name: 
Rod and Doug Webber Logging Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A logging truck with short logs on jeep and trailer heading north out of Penticton was proceeding around a right curve below posted speed limit when the load overturned, spilling logs over all 5 lanes of the highway.

This is normally a very busy corner and by sheer good luck, there were no vehicles hit by the logs. Substantial damage was sustained by the truck and the driver received minor injuries.

On examination, it was found there were 3 broken bolster-to-scale pad bolts allowing the load to tip when turning the corner (see photo in attached pdf).

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Part of every pre-trip inspection should include checking all visible bolts which could have prevented this incident before it happened. Any loose bolts should be replaced immediately.

With the added stress on the metal, there is too much risk of non-visible stress fractures to justify trying to retighten the loose bolt.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Rod Webber (250) 212-2037

File attachments
Load of logs spills on busy public road but no cars hit.pdf

Pickup and log truck collide in unexpected meeting

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
Ellis Creek Forest Service Road (near Penticton, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2014-01-06
Company Name: 
Lusted Logging Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

It was around mid-day when a worker in his pickup truck travelled southeast (down) the Ellis Creek FSR, heading for Penticton.

As he entered a corner at the 40.1 km mark, the pickup driver collided head on with an empty logging truck heading in the opposite direction (see photos in attached pdf).

It appears the pickup truck lost traction and control just prior to the corner and was attempting to correct as he entered the corner, when the collision occurred.

The pickup drivers’ logging radio was tuned into the logging contractor’s private operating channel rather than the road channel.

This would indicate that the pickup driver was unaware that the logging truck was travelling toward him and at what location.

The road was well maintained at the time of the collision.

It was noted that the driver was not wearing a seat belt at the time of the collision.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• OH&S Regulation 16.5 says, “The operator of mobile equipment must operate the equipment safely, maintain full control of the equipment, and comply with the laws governing the operation of the equipment.”

• Ensure the two-way radio in the vehicle is on the proper channel to allow for monitoring of and communication with other traffic in the area.

• Wear the seatbelt at all times

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Lusted Logging Ltd. tomlusted@nethop.net (250) 499-6201

File attachments
Pickup and log truck collide in unexpected meeting.pdf

Log truck driver hit in the jaw by binder

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
Southwest of Houston, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2014-01-10
Company Name: 
Andy Meints Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A log truck driver was wrapping up his load of logs - he threw the wrapper and was putting his binder on the wrapper chain.

As he was tightening his binder the truck driver’s wet gloves slipped, causing the binder to flip up and hit him in the jaw. His jaw was bruised and one of his teeth went through his lip causing a cut. The driver continued working for the rest of the day.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Use a bar to tighten binders

• Make sure gloves aren’t slippery

• Pay attention to the task at hand

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Ashlee Meints ameintscl@telus.net or (250) 845-7319

File attachments
Log truck driver hit in the jaw by binder.pdf

Mechanic suffers sore knee from work on helicopter

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
Gold River, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-10-18
Company Name: 
Canadian Air-Crane Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

While working in the cockpit of the helicopter a mechanic had been kneeling for an extended period of time while working on the collective.

Later that evening the worker noted that his knee began to feel sore. The next day when the worker was climbing off the helicopter he felt considerable pain in his knee and went to the clinic to have it checked out.

It was recommended that he take some time off to rest and allow his knee to heal.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

When working from a kneeling position for any duration always use a kneeling pad, knee pads or the use of other items to provide protection for your knees.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Canadian Air-Crane Ltd (604) 940-1715 or email: safety@air-crane.ca

 

File attachments
Mechanic suffers sore knee from work on helicopter.pdf

Cutting the corner leaves tri-drive truck, trailer and load at tipping point

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Farwell Canyon (west of Williams Lake, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-12-12
Company Name: 
Westline Harvesting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A loaded tri-drive truck with tridem hayrack trailer was travelling through Farwell Canyon, west of Williams Lake. The driver was ascending a hill and in the process of negotiating a sharp left hand corner (adverse switch back), when the trailer off-tracked over the inside edge of the roadway and upset. In turn, the passenger side tires of the truck were torqued into the air by the upset trailer and the truck ended up balanced on only its left side wheels.

The driver was not injured, but the truck and trailer sustained substantial damage. Further damage and/or injuries may have occurred had the truck tipped over completely or if this incident occurred at a higher speed.

Root Causes:

• The driver cut the corner and did not remain on the proper side of the roadway (lack of situational awareness, attempt to save time and effort).

• The driver failed to stop and reattempt the corner when the truck started to lose traction and slide to the inside of the corner, instead he attempted to power through the corner (attempt to save time and effort, failure to recognize hazard).

• The driver failed to monitor the position of his trailer and allowed it to off-track over the edge of the roadway (lack of situational awareness, attempt to save time and effort, failure to recognize hazard).

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Workers are reminded that in an upset condition to take their time, thoroughly assess the hazard/risk of a situation and take appropriate corrective action(s).

• Drivers must remain on the proper side of the roadway and not cut corners.

• Drivers must know the location/position of their truck and trailer, and take trailer off-tracking into consideration.

• Drivers of tridem hayrack trailers need to pay special attention to the positioning of the trailer due to the excessive off-tracking associated with this configuration.

• If traction is at all in question, stop and put on tire chains prior to losing traction.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Wayne Erlandson at (250) 392-2001

File attachments
Cutting the corner leaves tri-drive truck, trailer and load at tipping point.pdf

Log truck chain-up stop nearly ends in tragedy

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Farwell Canyon (west of Williams Lake, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-12-11
Company Name: 
Westline Harvesting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A worker was driving an empty super-b-train through Farwell Canyon (west of Williams Lake) to get a load of logs when his truck & trailer spun out. The driver set the maxi-brake on the truck but did not set the maxi-brake on the trailer before exiting the truck to chain up.

As the driver stepped on the ground, the truck slid backwards slightly and stopped. The driver then attempted to take the tire chains off the chain hanger when the truck started sliding down the hill. The driver lost his balance with the tire chains still on the chain hanger. The driver was dragged down the hill for a distance before making the decision to release his grip on the chains and roll out of the way of the driver’s side steering tire.

Unfortunately the driver did not completely clear the driver’s side steering tire. The tire contacted his lower back, and virtually squirted him out from under it. This could have been a fatality had the tire run completely over the driver.

Root Causes:

• The driver was in a hurry to get the roadway cleared, and was trying to save time by not applying the trailer maxi-brake (dumping all the air out of the system).

• The driver failed to recognize the hazard that the hot drive axle tires posed on sloped icy road grade.

• The driver failed to recognize the limited holding power that the 8 hot tires on the two drive axles provided.

• The driver failed to ensure that the transmission was properly in gear.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Workers are reminded that in an upset condition to take their time, thoroughly assess the hazard/risk of a situation and take appropriate corrective action(s).

• Apply the maxi-brakes on both the truck and trailer when stopped on an incline. In this incident, the braking/holding power would have been increased by 250% had the trailer brakes been applied.

• If traction is at all in question, stop and put on tire chains prior to losing traction.

• Ensure that your transmission is properly in gear.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Wayne Erlandson at (250) 392-2001

File attachments
Log truck chain-up stop nearly ends in tragedy.pdf

Mobile tail spar rolls over during move, now a write-off

Safety Alert Type: 
Yarding and Loading
Location: 
Approximately 90 km north of Terrace, BC (km 61 on Big Cedar Mainline)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-08-26
Company Name: 
Brinkman Forest Ltd./Coast Tsimshian Resources
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On a logging show near Terrace, a back spar machine was walking into the setting to prepare to set-up for grapple yarding. It up-ended on a steep, unstable pitch in the setting and flipped over a number of times into the cut block below, while the operator remained inside. The operator was not injured. The machine suffered severe damage and was unrecoverable.

Incident Details and Timelines: On August 23rd, 2013, a Friday near the end of the work day, a brief logging inspection was conducted on the above mentioned logging show to check on the status of a road capping (gravelling) project.

At that time, grapple yarding operations were taking place. The terrain was relatively steep, with side slopes around 35% in the area that was being yarded. The yarder was rigged to a stump within the setting, as the boundary of the setting was bordered by an older, free-growing block of regeneration with no tail holds.

Prior to leaving the setting, the Operations Forester was having a conversation with the in-charge bush foreman. The foreman had asked if they could use their mobile tail spar along the western boundary of the setting in order to speed up productivity. The answer was yes; however, they had to construct an excavated or bladed trail through the setting for safety reasons due to the steep side slope.

On Monday, August 26th, the Operations Forester received a phone call from the contract owner in the late afternoon, that the mobile tail spar had rolled down the hill from the setting edge and flipped a few times through the regeneration, with the operator inside the cab, prior to coming to rest approximately 80-metres from the edge of the setting to where it up-ended.

When asked, the owner confirmed that the operator was uninjured, with the exception of some minor cuts and bruising etc. The operator was assessed on-site by the First Aid attendant and subsequently taken to the hospital for further examination.

A follow-up investigation was conducted early the next day. The first aid attendant pointed out where the machine had begun walking into the setting from the road edge and the approximate location of where it went over. It is alleged that the yarder operator was the only witness to the machine flipping over.

Upon walking the path of travel of the back spar machine, it became quite clear that there was no attempt made to actually construct a level “trail” for the purposes of walking the machine through the setting with secure and stable footing. The machine was walked across the stumps and logging debris at an angle that cut across the contours of the slope but in a downward direction. Upon doing so, it encountered obstacles of debris and steeper pitches of undulating terrain.

To make the situation worse, the ground beneath the logging debris was wet and soft from previous days of rain (hence the capping of the road) and there were sporadic sections along the travel path where the machine slid downwards along the hill in short, steep pitches, indicating unstable terrain. The travel path of the machine was clearly evident within the block and showed exposed, silty clay material, confirming soft ground at the time (see photos in attached pdf).

Just prior to the location where the machine up-ended, there were a few chunks of logs and debris pointing up and down the slope at a steep angle across the travel path of the machine. It was concluded that failure to remove the coarse debris and construct a flat, level work area caused the up-ending of the machine and subsequent rollover(s).

Investigation Findings - Incident Causes:

• Failure to follow Safe Work Procedures by ensuring that the path of the machine is clear of logs and other obstacles and that traction is adequate. Construction of a flat, level trail for solid machine footing across steep ground did not take place.

• Lack of recognition of / or disregard for unsafe act. • Unstable, undulating terrain and soft, wet ground (weather).

• Improper loading of machinery onto unstable debris.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Safe work practices were established for this phase of the operation but not followed. This will be discussed with crew at tailgate meetings. In addition, it was determined that the SWP’s were not complete based on this incident and required revision.

• The Safe Work Practices for Mobile Grapple Yarder Operations only specified that “traction should be adequate” and that “the path of the machine should be clear of logs and other obstacles”. It does not specify that an actual “flat trail” be constructed to safely maneuver machinery across a slope, as this was implied. This will need to be added to the SWP’s as it was a contributing factor to the incident. Even if the operator had ensured that the path of the machine was clear of logs and other obstacles, it is unlikely that the incident would have been prevented since there is evidence of the machine sliding on steep, unstable, wet terrain.

• Revise SWP’s and discuss with crew at tailgate meetings. It is an acceptable practice to build and utilize trails on steeper terrain if it will create a safer working environment for machinery.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information contact: Benjamin R. Korving, RPF Operations Forester, Brinkman Forest Ltd. / Coast Tsimshian Resources Ben_Korving@brinkman.ca

 

File attachments
Mobile tail spar rolls over during move, now a write-off.pdf

Serious Incident: Equipment operator left behind, forced to spend overnight in his machine

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
Northwest of Prince George, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-11-14
Company Name: 
Stones Bay Holdings Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A subcontract buncher operator had stopped for repairs near the end of his shift. He needed to walk out to his pick-up for tools approximately 1.5 – 2.0 kilometres away. It was late and dark outside. He looked in his machine and his flashlight was missing. He called his co-workers (employees of the subcontractor) and received no reply.

Ultimately, the buncher operator spent the night in his buncher—dark and cold. The employees of the subcontractor had gone home early and said nothing.

Root Causes: The employees of the subcontractor left early and did not advise anyone they were leaving. Also, the buncher was not adequately prepared for winter (no flashlight, etc.). MAN CHECKS ARE VERY IMPORTANT! Be sure they are being done.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Review this incident at both safety committee meetings and tailgate meetings with emphasis placed on importance of man checks and winter preparedness.

• Make sure you have adequate, suitable clothing and other emergency supplies - you never know when you might need them!

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Darren McQueen, Stones Bay Holdings Ltd. (250)-996-8912

File attachments
Serious Incident: Equipment operator left behind, forced to spend overnight in his machine.pdf

Communication is vital on fast changing weather and road conditions

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
14.5 km Owl Head Forest Service Road (near Sicamous, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-10-28
Company Name: 
Gudeit Forest Products
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A log truck driver in first haul position headed empty up to the block. Road conditions were clear with frozen mud rutted areas due to muddy conditions prior.

From experience and driving the road prior, the driver assessed that one set of chains would be sufficient. After loading and beginning his descent down to the mill, he came upon an icy patch that was in a leaning bend in the road (it had become icy due to all the traffic on the road that followed up behind him). Also, fast changing weather conditions on this road are normal and were an issue.

The tandem quad axle unit slipped in this bend and the force and weight of the trailer pushed sideways over the bank causing the truck to roll over one full revolution along with the trailer (see attached pdf for photo).

The driver sustained injuries from which he is recovering at home.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Experienced driver to not only assess road conditions on the way up to but to factor in road traffic and weather changes that are very common on this road.

• Emphasize communication with other drivers on the road prior to descending the block as to how current conditions of the road are, to determine if more chains would be required.

• Road maintenance to grade out mud ruts so trucks don’t get stuck in them and so they can grab shoulder gravel for traction.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Gudeit Forest Products (250) 542-2325

File attachments
Communication is vital on fast changing weather and road conditions.pdf

Broken coupling leaves skidder without hydraulics, brakes

Safety Alert Type: 
Heavy Equipment
Location: 
Hyas Lake (near Kamloops, BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2013-10-03
Company Name: 
Interfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A skidder (630 Tigercat model) was backing up a hill in reverse to grab a turn of logs. The hill had a gentle slope of approximately 20 per cent.

The skidder made a sudden noise, stopped; lights and buzzers came on and the machine took off forward (as if in neutral), down the hill. The operator attempted to apply the brakes and lower the blade to the ground in order to stop the machine from moving. The hydraulic functions did not work.

The operator then tried steering the skidder onto a flat piece of ground where the machine finally came to a stop, approximately 20 metres from where it started to roll away.

Upon investigation, it was discovered that the coupler between the engine and the hydraulic pump had broken. The 630 Tigercat skidder is hydrostatic drive and when the coupler broke, the machine lost all hydraulic functions (brakes, blade, steering).

The operator was startled by the incident but did not sustain any injuries.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Refer to the operator’s manual for the use of and testing of the emergency braking system. It is recommended that this be done prior to the start of each shift.

• Contact a Tigercat sales representative/service advisor with regards to the availability of an updated coupler for this model of skidder.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information: Ed Coombes, Interfor (250) 679-6863

File attachments
Broken coupling leaves skidder without hydraulics, brakes.pdf
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