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Safety Hazard Alert

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-08
Company Name: 
BURKE PURDON ENTERPRISES LTD.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

While attempting to adjust the radio, a driver was distracted enough that he let the truck drift to the shoulder of the road. Although he corrected the truck, the trailer tracked into the ditch. This caused both units to flop on to their sides. Fortunately the driver was going slow when this happened and was wearing his seatbelt. It is probably these two reasons he was not injured.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

As professional drivers, do not let anything distract you from your duties. It is not safe to focus on activities that are not related to driving. Looking for lost objects in the cab, eating, talking on the phone, etc. are all activities that distract your attention. Please stop the truck if you can not focus on driving.

Hauling logs is a dangerous job. Respect it, don’t let it kill you.
Wear your seatbelt, slow down, and live to tell about it.

File attachments
2007-09-08 Undue Care Causes Truck To Roll onto Side.pdf

Checklist 16-1

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Seaward (tlasta) Business Area - Port McNeill Timber Sales Office
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-06
Company Name: 
BC Timber Sales
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A Timber Sales Licensee recently experienced a logging truck rollover relating to a road segment exceeding 18% which was not risk assessed as per the WorkSafeBC OHS Guideline 26.2-2 “Planning log hauling operations for varying road grades”. The Licensee was not aware of the requirement under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation to conduct a risk assessment on road grades exceeding 18%.

WorkSafe BC voiced concern that Licensees were not aware of the location of road segments exceeding 18% gradient, or of the WorkSafe requirement to conduct a risk assessment on these road segments. WorkSafe also advised that these guidelines are not being applied uniformly by Timber Sales Licensees, and therefore posed an ongoing safety hazard provincially.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Seaward (tlasta) Business Area as the first owner will make known those segments of road designed and/or built to exceed 18% gradient to respective Timber Sale Licence bidders.
Seaward (tlasta) Business Area recommends that the Forest Safety Council send out a safety bulletin to its members reminding them of:

G26.2-2 Planning log hauling operations for varying road grades
Issued: September 28, 2005
OHS Guidelines Part 26 Forestry Operations
The Forest Engineering Research Institute of Canada (FERIC) has developed descent guidelines for several operating conditions:
Development of guidelines for descending steep grades: British Columbia coastal off-highway truck applications FPInnovations - FERIC Division

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Glenn Piggot, Area Forester
Port McNeill Timber Sales Office
(250) 956-5106

File attachments
2007-09-06 Checklist 16-1.pdf

NEAR MISS

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-20
Company Name: 
AMBOY LOGGING LTD
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A pickup was travelling on a controlled road towards the job site. Suddenly it was confronted by a loaded log truck on the road coming towards it. The pickup had to swerve into the ditch/bush.
Neither the log truck driver nor the driver of the pickup were calling their kilometres. The weather conditions were less that ideal. It was raining and the clay ground was very slippery.
Luckily, no injury or damage occurred, but the incident could have resulted in serious injuries.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Always call your kilometres when driving on a controlled road. Both drivers should have adjusted their speed and awareness to compensate for the weather conditions. The driver of the pickup should be noting wider areas of the road where he can pull over to let the logging trucks by.

File attachments
2007-08-20 Near miss between pickup na dloaded logging truck.pdf

Buckerman Injured while working near log deck

Location: 
BC Southern Interior
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2006-12-01
Company Name: 
H.A. Friedenberger Contracting Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A buckerman was injured while bucking down slope from manufactured logs that were being decked on the high side of a small road right‐of‐way landing. An ice covered hemlock log that was over 49’ in length slid off the log deck while the loader operator was positioning it in the deck.
The buckerman saw the log approaching in his direction, so he ran and fell, twisting his knee. The loader operator grabbed the moving hemlock log with the grapple of his loader. This action stopped the log from sliding toward the buckerman, avoiding further injury to him.
The buckerman received medical treatment at the hospital in Nakusp, where it was determined that he had slightly torn ligaments in his right knee. There was no loss of time due to the injury.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Loader operators must ensure all workers are in the clear before decking logs / trees.
• Avoid constructing / utilizing log decks located on the high side of confined landings. Logs should be decked on the low side of confined landings.
• Logs should be decked at a height that will not compromise the stability of the logs being decked. Plan to have logs loaded and hauled by logging trucks before the decked logs’ height becomes a safety concern.
• Proceed with increased caution when handling ice covered logs.

File attachments
alerts-07-07-11-buckerman_injury.pdf

Buckerman Injured on Landing

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-01
Company Name: 
H.A. Friedenberger Contracting Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A buckerman was injured while walking to buck a turn of logs set out on a small landing located near a cable yarder setting.
As the buckerman was approaching the turn on the landing from his “safe area”, he tripped on some cedar branches that were covering a small depression. The buckerman experienced pain in his upper left leg.
The buckerman received medical treatment at the hospital in Nakusp, where it was determined that he had pulled a groin muscle in his left leg. There was lost time due to the injury.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Landings should be constructed level, free of depressions / mounds, and any other tripping hazards.
2. Slash and debris on landings should be cleared at a frequency as to not allow slash and debris to interfere with a
person’s safe access / egress while working on the landing.
3. Persons walking on landings should ensure good footing while doing so.

File attachments
alerts-07-09-01-buckerman.pdf

FOREST INDUSTRY SAFETY ALERT

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Meickle Creek Road
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-22
Company Name: 
Northwind Logging Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Mechanic was helping Low-bed driver attach cinches and chains to a load. While in the process of tightening a cinch, the handle broke off causing the mechanic to fall back. The sudden twist caused a minor sprain to his ankle, but could have been much worse.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

All truck drivers and others using cinches should inspect them periodically for cracks or flaws to help avoid this type of failure.

File attachments
2007-08-22 Broken handle leads to fall.pdf

Do Not Fall Trees Uphill on Steep Slopes

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-03-03
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A worker was falling a fir uphill on a 50 percent slope. The 175-foot fir had a sweep ("hockey
stick") at the butt and was leaning heavily uphill. As the fir fell, it struck two previously felled
trees and broke in two pieces. The butt end rolled to one side and slid down the slope. It hit the
faller as he exited along his escape route. He was dragged 28 feet downhill, sustaining serious
injuries.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Do not fall trees uphill on steep slopes. Limit the direction of fall to a maximum upslope
angle of 15 degrees off level.
• Discuss falling difficulties with your supervisor/bullbucker or falling partner.
• Consider alternative methods if the tree must be removed uphill on a steep slope.
• Recognize that a tree with an unusual shape may not fall in the intended direction.
• Brush out your escape route and plan an alternative route in case the tree does not fall
as intended.

File attachments
alerts-07-03-03-falling_slopes.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Main Tolko hauling road, approximately 60 km west of Williams Lake
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-10
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A loaded northbound logging truck was approaching an active company grader that was traveling south grading the road. The grader was working a section of running surface and had a berm of dirt and rocks in the centre of the road. It was unlikely that vehicles could straddle the berm without hitting their undercarriage on the larger rocks. To alleviate this, the logging truck chose to hug tight to the road edge. As he was doing this, a soft section of the road edge collapsed under the weight of the trailer, causing it to flop over onto its side. The driver was not injured but the trailer sustained extensive damage.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Where it is feasible to do so, grader is to place the dirt berm closer to the road edge to create a wider driveable surface on the opposite side. In circumstances where this is not feasible, graders are to work short sections of road at one time.

File attachments
2007-07-10 Trailer rolls after hitting soft spot on road.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Kamloops, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-31
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A logging truck pulling a B-train loaded the trailer after dumping at Tolko Industries, Heffley Division; and headed south on Highway 5. The truck went over a “frost heave” on the highway and the driver did hear a “clunk” but thought that it was just the trailer settling.

The truck went through an intersection and was accelerating to about 40km when it snagged a wire crossing the highway; the driver saw a telephone pole falling behind him and stopped immediately. He then realized that it was actually the chain holding the stake down on the trailer bunk that made the “clunk”, releasing the stake and making the truck over height.

When the stake caught the wire it actually caused 2 poles to fall; one on either side of the highway; the pole on the opposite side of the highway struck a vehicle heading north, luckily there were no injuries. The driver was given a ticket for being over height.

The DOT inspected the trailer at the accident site and deemed it safe for operation; but the stake would need to be replaced before hauling logs.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Upon further inspection the driver found that the chain on the stake actually broke. He realizes that he should have stopped and checked the “clunk” and in the future will stop when he hears any kind of noise from the back of the truck.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Shannon @ 250-378-5611

File attachments
2007-08-31 OverHeight Vechile Brings Down Power Lines.pdf

Worker Was Injured While Bucking a Windfall to Clear a Road

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2006-12-01
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

In December 2006, a grader was clearing snow and had
pushed through a group of two windfall trees. The tops were
broken off, and the trees were swept into the ditchline creating
tension in the logs. Approximately four hours later a worker
passed by the windfalls that the grader pushed / cleared off the
road. The trees were mainly in the ditchline, but crowding the
roadway. The worker decided to buck the trees further back
off the roadway. The worker bucked the first tree, a 9”
diameter fir log approx 38 feet long without incident. While
bucking the second log, a 5.5” fir approx 48 feet long it broke
under tension and swung back, hitting him on his left leg just
below the knee. The worker was sent to the hospital where it
was later assessed that he had a ligament tear in his left knee.

 

1. A grader pushed two small windfalls off the roadway
to clear the road, creating tension in the logs.
2. Later the same day, a worker decided to buck the
windfall logs further off the roadway and did not
recognize the tension in the logs.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Be aware of windfall logs that may be under tension as a result of graders or other equipment trying to push, or
remove them from the roadway.
2. If a grader or other machine operator creates a hazard by pushing logs / trees off a road and can not remove the
hazard they should tie a “danger tree” ribbon to the hazard and communicate the hazard and its location to their
supervisor.
3. Prior to bucking any tree or windfall, ensure proper time is taken to properly assess the tree for any hazards that
may exist, such as tension in a log.

File attachments
alerts-07-01-09-wfp_windfall.pdf
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