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Speed of Pickups when Passing Graders

Location: 
Polar 200 Rd
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-09-26
Company Name: 
Canfor Woodlands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

I received a report on September 26, 2007 from a gradermen operating on the Polar 200 Rd that pickups are passing him at high rates of speed.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

As per Rule #2 of the Canfor Rules of the Road/Radio Calling Procedures all drivers shall slow down for oncoming traffic, when passing a stopped vehicle, and when meeting any road maintenance equipment. The expectation is that all traffic including pickups must slow down to 15 km/hr and slowly pass road maintenance equipment.

Could all harvest contractors (quota and private) please remind their crews driving pickups of the importance of slowing down when approaching a grader or other road maintenance equipment on the logging roads.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

PG Woodlands Safety Committee

File attachments
2007-09-26 Speed of Pickups when Passing Graders.pdf

Close Call

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Ladysmith, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-04-16
Company Name: 
CopCan Contracting Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On April 16, 2007, a CopCan Contracting Ltd. lowbed operator was unloading a machine off a lowbed when it struck a gate, which swung open. The gate hit a gravel bank and recoiled, striking the diesel tank of the lowbed, leaving a large dent but not rupturing. If workers had not been in the clear and had been struck by the gate, they could have been seriously injured. There were two spotters positioned in the clear, but the lowbed operator did not use them and so they were unable to notify the operator until after the incident happened.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Drivers, Operators and Spotters must assess the area more closely, prior to unloading machines. All spotters must be well in the clear at all times.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

John Gregson 250-754-7260

File attachments
2007-04-16 Lowbed struck gate.pdf

Recreational Use of Logging Roads

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-02-01
Company Name: 
Ted LeRoy Trucking Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Recently there was an incident in which a Ted LeRoy Trucking Ltd. truck driver suddenly encountered an ATV being driven on a logging road. Fortunately, the truck driver was driving at an appropriate speed and was observing all the safe work practices for his job and was able to avoid a collision.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

It is possible to encounter people driving ATV’s, riding bicycles, walking and even riding horses within our working areas and haul roads. Many people are unaware of the hazards they may encounter in active logging areas and on haul roads. Therefore, it is incumbent on all of us to use extra caution in the event we suddenly encounter recreational users within our active areas. The chance of these encounters increases during warm weather when recreational use such as camping and fishing increases. Please stay alert and expect the unexpected.

File attachments
2007-02-01 ATV on logging road.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Silviculture Operation
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-06-01
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

IMPORTANCE OF CURRENT DRIVER’S ABSTRACTS

Foremen staff had been hired from previous years employees both returning foremen and one new planting foreman. Foremen are responsible for driving their crews in company supplied “crew” vehicles. All foremen were asked to provide current Drivers Abstracts at the beginning of the season. Abstracts came in after a push by management after having too many – “too busy” & “I forgot” excuses.

One foreman in particular continued to avoid the process and management traveled to the site to have the driver/foreman produce their license on the spot. A 1-800 number was to be called from the site to have the abstract faxed to the office. The license produced was an “N”, with the restrictions of only 1 passenger that was not a family. This driver was fully aware of his license restrictions and the fact that he was driving outside of his “scope” and illegally, but directly told management that he it was their “due diligence” to ensure he was legal and that he had no problem taking the chance.

This truck was returned to town with a “valid” drivers license holder and was parked. The driver in question was terminated immediately for breaching several of the criteria for “immediate termination” as laid out in the company’s health & safety program and its discipline model.

The employee in question had worked the prior season for another company in the province in the same capacity (as a crew foreman – responsible for driving). In his dealings with management he was asked how he was able to drive for the other company, which he responded that the license issue was known by his prior employers and that they had contacted ICBC to get clearance. A call to both the prior employer showed that this was a lie – the ICBC agent laughed and the it was the first the prior employer had heard that this employee did not have a valid license.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. All employees that will be or may be driving company vehicles, are required to present a current drivers abstract prior to driving company vehicles. A deadline will be set prior to the next season’s operational start up.
2. A 1-800 number is available during business hours and if an employee is not able to physically attend a local licensing branch, a copy will be faxed to the fax of choice within hours of the request being heard.
3. Internal policy that company vehicles will not be operated without a current abstact on file.
4. Abstracts to be updated annually, with the employers discretion to request an abstract at any time.

The employee in question was 28 yrs old – an age that makes it easy to assume they would have a valid license. References were checked regarding their foreman duties the prior season, which made it easier to assume they had a valid license.

File attachments
2007-06-01 Importance of driver abstracts.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Island Highway #19 - Southbound Between Port McNeill & Woss, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-04-23
Company Name: 
Surespan
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Two Surespan semi trucks and trailers (tridem highboys) were transporting HC11- Terex
Crane Components from a forestru bridge project site to Surespan’s yard in Duncan. The
first truck’s trailer had the crane’s track counterweights tied down to it. Just before taking
a corner the driver of the first truck slowed down. Suddenly the track counterweights’ tie
down straps broke, causing the components to slide off the trailer and land in a ditch,
which was located parallel to the outside lane. The driver of the second truck did not
witness the incident but was able to safely stop and assist the driver of the first truck.
Incident reporting procedures were followed and corrective actions were implemented
accordingly.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Review trailer tie-down procedures and requirements for specific crane
components.
• Always ensure dunnage is placed underneath crane components before hauling.
• Always inspect tie-down materials/equipment prior to using them to secure loads
to trailers.
• Always check trailer load before leaving site.
• Review Safe Work Practices for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment with workers
involved in incident.
• Review Safe Job Procedures for Heavy Equipment Haulers with workers involved
in incident.
• Have toolbox meeting with crews to discuss incident.
• Circulate Safety Alert to BCFSC & Forestry Client as required.
• Post investigation and safety alert on EHS bulletin board at Head Office.
• Discuss incident investigation and corrective actions/recommendations at the
next regularly scheduled OHS Committee Meeting.

For more information on this submitted alert: 
File attachments
2007-04-23 tie-down break leads to crash.pdf

Safety Hazard Alert

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2006-12-29
Company Name: 
Blackwater Construction
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On December 29, 2006 the Molly on a logging truck broke while trailer was being unloaded.

This caused the trailer to fall, damaging a stake and 2 air bags.

This happened because the Molly had slipped within the clamps attached to the trailer, causing the loader to be lifting on an unprotected area. This resulted in the cable being cut through.

This could have happened while driver was loading trailer.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

One action is to add block protection all the way around Molly and replace blocks when worn.

The other action is to bring to the attention of all drivers, the necessity of complete equipment inspections prior to, during, and after work activities.

Ensure the Molly and lifting blocks are centered for lifting.

If your log states your equipment is in good repair, it needs to have been inspected, not taken for granted. Especially areas we might not inspect often enough. (Molly’s, bunks, 5th wheels, suspension, etc.)

Be safe; ensure your equipment is in prime operational condition.

File attachments
2006-12-29 Molly broke while trailer being unloaded.pdf

2007 Safety Alert #2

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Exiting from Highway 1 onto the Squilax Anglemont Road
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-04-16
Company Name: 
Adams Lake Lumber
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

In recent years there have been several trucks flip on to their side when exiting from Highway 1 onto the Squilax Anglemont Road. In all cases truck drivers were surprised and didn’t anticipate the outcome.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Key Points to remember when negotiating this turn:
•Be aware of the short exit lane prior to the turn. This lane doesn’t give logging trucks much room to slow down prior to entering the curve.
•Drivers should be aware of on coming traffic from the east bound lane. Traffic entering on to the Squilax Angelmont Road often cross lanes in order to cut the corner.
•Reduce your speed to a recommended maximum of 20km/hr.
•Lower speeds may be required depending on truck configuration (i.e. jeep trailers).

This is a high volume traffic area. Any incident in this area has the potential of causing a fatality or a serious injury. Drivers must be aware of these hazards and should not become complacent when negotiating this turn.

File attachments
2007-04-16 truck flip onto side.pdf

Safety Alert

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-03
Company Name: 
Weyerhaeuser / BC Forestlands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On July 3, 2007, a log truck driver from one of BC Forestlands - Princeton operations logging contractors was seriously injured while his truck was being loaded. His most severe injuries include a broken leg, multiple broken ribs, a bruised kidney and a punctured lung. He is fortunate to be alive and is now faced with a long recovery.
From the preliminary investigation, so far we have learned that;
- it appears the driver made a decision to move out of the designated safe zone while loading was ongoing. BC Forestlands standard for loading states “Remain in the cab or stand in front of the truck well away from the risk of moving equipment, logs or flying debris”.
- while the grapple loader was getting a grapple of logs from the log deck, a 3’ chunk of debris was picked up with the grapple full of logs. When the loader came back to the truck, some of the logs escaped from the front of the grapple and fell toward the truck. The driver was standing near his driver door at the time and was struck by the logs. It appears that the chunk of debris tangled in the grapple of logs contributed to the logs falling out of the grapple

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1.Remind drivers they MUST stay in their safe zone at all times while loading is in progress
2.Inspect frequently to ensure that this and other critical standards are being followed.
3.Ensure, as much as reasonably possible, that debris is put in the debris/slash pile and does not get into the log decks.

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Chetwynd, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-02-05
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Oil Patch pick-up collided with loaded log truck on a radio controlled road.
This accident resulted in injury to pick-up truck driver that required medical attention, as well as serious damage to the pick-up. It was determined that the pick-up did not have a two-way mobile radio and was traveling too fast for road conditions.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. All road users must have and use two-way radio communication on radio controlled roads.
2. Empty vehicles must clear loaded vehicles.
3. Drive according to road conditions.

File attachments
2007-02-05 pick-up collided with logging truck.pdf

Safety Alert

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-02-04
Company Name: 
Weyerhaeuser
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Recently a log hauler stopped at the designated pull out area to hammer mark his load where he got injured. The location selected for this activity was a wide spot in the road where a cattle guard was located. The location was chosen as it was wide enough to allow for oncoming traffic to pass while a truck driver is outside his truck attending to his load.

The existence of the cattle guard created a hazard to drivers as they walked around their loaded trucks inspecting their loads, especially in darkened conditions.

The investigation discovered that there are no written standards for selection of safe worksites being designated for marking loads or chaining up.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1) When selecting sites for chaining up &/or marking & checking loads consideration must be given to avoiding the following hazards as a minimum;
- flat grade
- free of tripping hazards (cattle guard, pot holes , snow berms etc.)
- wide enough to accommodate anticipated traffic (consider other users as well)
- adequate sight lines ( for non radio equipped traffic)
- free of danger trees
2) As these sites are part of the worksite they need to be inspected for changes in conditions that can lead to development of unsafe working conditions
- do maintenance as necessary

File attachments
2007-02-04 cattle gaurd causes injury.pdf
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