Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Main Tolko hauling road, approximately 60 km west of Williams Lake
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-10
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A loaded northbound logging truck was approaching an active company grader that was traveling south grading the road. The grader was working a section of running surface and had a berm of dirt and rocks in the centre of the road. It was unlikely that vehicles could straddle the berm without hitting their undercarriage on the larger rocks. To alleviate this, the logging truck chose to hug tight to the road edge. As he was doing this, a soft section of the road edge collapsed under the weight of the trailer, causing it to flop over onto its side. The driver was not injured but the trailer sustained extensive damage.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Where it is feasible to do so, grader is to place the dirt berm closer to the road edge to create a wider driveable surface on the opposite side. In circumstances where this is not feasible, graders are to work short sections of road at one time.

File attachments
2007-07-10 Trailer rolls after hitting soft spot on road.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Kamloops, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-31
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A logging truck pulling a B-train loaded the trailer after dumping at Tolko Industries, Heffley Division; and headed south on Highway 5. The truck went over a “frost heave” on the highway and the driver did hear a “clunk” but thought that it was just the trailer settling.

The truck went through an intersection and was accelerating to about 40km when it snagged a wire crossing the highway; the driver saw a telephone pole falling behind him and stopped immediately. He then realized that it was actually the chain holding the stake down on the trailer bunk that made the “clunk”, releasing the stake and making the truck over height.

When the stake caught the wire it actually caused 2 poles to fall; one on either side of the highway; the pole on the opposite side of the highway struck a vehicle heading north, luckily there were no injuries. The driver was given a ticket for being over height.

The DOT inspected the trailer at the accident site and deemed it safe for operation; but the stake would need to be replaced before hauling logs.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Upon further inspection the driver found that the chain on the stake actually broke. He realizes that he should have stopped and checked the “clunk” and in the future will stop when he hears any kind of noise from the back of the truck.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Shannon @ 250-378-5611

File attachments
2007-08-31 OverHeight Vechile Brings Down Power Lines.pdf

Worker Was Injured While Bucking a Windfall to Clear a Road

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2006-12-01
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

In December 2006, a grader was clearing snow and had
pushed through a group of two windfall trees. The tops were
broken off, and the trees were swept into the ditchline creating
tension in the logs. Approximately four hours later a worker
passed by the windfalls that the grader pushed / cleared off the
road. The trees were mainly in the ditchline, but crowding the
roadway. The worker decided to buck the trees further back
off the roadway. The worker bucked the first tree, a 9”
diameter fir log approx 38 feet long without incident. While
bucking the second log, a 5.5” fir approx 48 feet long it broke
under tension and swung back, hitting him on his left leg just
below the knee. The worker was sent to the hospital where it
was later assessed that he had a ligament tear in his left knee.

 

1. A grader pushed two small windfalls off the roadway
to clear the road, creating tension in the logs.
2. Later the same day, a worker decided to buck the
windfall logs further off the roadway and did not
recognize the tension in the logs.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Be aware of windfall logs that may be under tension as a result of graders or other equipment trying to push, or
remove them from the roadway.
2. If a grader or other machine operator creates a hazard by pushing logs / trees off a road and can not remove the
hazard they should tie a “danger tree” ribbon to the hazard and communicate the hazard and its location to their
supervisor.
3. Prior to bucking any tree or windfall, ensure proper time is taken to properly assess the tree for any hazards that
may exist, such as tension in a log.

File attachments
alerts-07-01-09-wfp_windfall.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-09
Company Name: 
Dunkley Lumber Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

An employee of Dunkley Lumber Ltd. called “loaded” at a mandatory call sign posted immediately before the junction of 2 major roads. Immediately after this call, another mandatory call was made by a logging truck that was approaching this junction on the opposite road. The Dunkley employee realized that they would be meeting at this junction at the same time and therefore slowed down slightly and paid extra attention. At the junction, the Dunkley employee witnessed the logging truck drive through the “yield” sign without checking for traffic that had right-of-way. If the Dunkley employee had not slowed down and paid extra attention to the situation, an accident would have occurred.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• The Dunkley employee immediately after this incident talked to the driver of the logging truck to inform him of what he had done and to review Dunkley’s “Safe Driving Rules and Practices”, especially the section on obeying all traffic signs.
• A notice about following Dunkley’s “Safe Driving Rules and Practices” has been distributed to all of the contractors using this road system.
• Some of the trees and debris at the junction of the road were removed to increase visibility for all drivers approaching this junction.

File attachments
2007-10-09 Close Call At Intersection.pdf

Hand faller struck by oversized fir tree

Location: 
Horsefly, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-16
Company Name: 
Progressive Harvesting (2000) Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The Worker, a Sub-Contracted Hand Faller, was struck mid-back by tree while engaged in hand falling operations of an oversized fir tree. The worker was not pinned by the tree and was able to free himself and walk out to his vehicle, located on a spur road approximately 100 yards downhill from where he was falling. The worker was met on the road by the worksite foreman and advised him of the incident.
A review of the scene location and subsequent investigation performed by the company has lead to the conclusion that the worker was stuck by a tree other than the one that he had intended to fall. It appeared that the hand faller had followed proper safety practices with respects to making proper cuts on the tree that he had intended to fall, choosing the correct direction in which to fall the tree and in identifying an appropriate escape route.
It is unclear if the tree that struck the worker was free standing or if it had been “hung up” in the standing trees prior to the oversized fir tree being fell. It was noted that the popular tree, which struck the worker did have a green top, however it appeared that the roots were rotten. Further to this the butt of the tree appeared to have sustained machine damage, possible due to mechanical harvesting operations that had been undertaken in that area a few weeks earlier.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Review overhead hazard assessments with all mechanical and manual fallers operating on a worksite where the company has been designated with Prime Contractor status. If a hand faller believes that there is potential for injury as a result of overhead hazard(s) the hand faller will cease falling operations in that area of the worksite.

2. Potential overhead hazards are to be flagged by the hand faller and the worksite supervisor is to be notified. The worksite supervisor and the hand faller will then reassess the potential hazard(s) together and determine and appropriate course of action for eliminating the hazard(s) so that hand falling activities can be resumed.

3. Review of Standard Operating Procedures and Safe Work Procedures as they relate to both mechanical and manual hand falling in and effort to identify and rectify potential weaknesses so as to prevent further occurrences similar to this one.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Progressive Harvesting (2000) Ltd.
PO Box 4357
Williams Lake, BC
V2G 2V4
(250) 392-4410 – phone
(250) 392-4405 – fax
progressive_harvesting@hotmail.com

File attachments
alerts-07-08-06-faller_struck.pdf

2007-10-18 Windfall damages log truck

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Ingram Creek
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-18
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

An empty logging truck was traveling about 10 – 15 km per hour past a small wildlife tree patch, when a strong gust of wind caught an 80 ft green spruce tree and upended it on across the hood of the truck. Just after this tree fell two more close to the road fell behind the vehicle and two more further in crashed down as well.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Review the positioning of Wildlife Tree Patches (WTP) when setting up blocks.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

 

BC Forest Safety Council

 

“Unsafe is Unacceptable”

 

 

File attachments
2007-10-18 Windfall damages log truck.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
2.5 km on King Edward Lake Rd.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-20
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

One of our loaded logging trucks was following another loaded truck down King Edward Lake Rd in dusty conditions. The first truck notified our driver of a dirtbike coming up the road. But due to the thick dust he wasnt able to see the dirtbike and the dirtbike almost ran into our logging truck.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Ultimately ,the dirtbike was not authorized to be on a posted logging road, but expect the unexpected. Also extra caution should be used when travelling in dusty conditions where visibility is reduced.
You never know what you'll encounter!!

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Driver involved : Wyatt Schwartz 250 547 9795
Supervisor : Jeff Kineshanko 250 306 2687

File attachments
2007-07-20 Dusty road leads to near miss.pdf

HAZARD ALERT

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-21
Company Name: 
Stones Bay Holdings Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

There were 2 near miss road incidents yesterday. In both cases, loaded log trucks were on their way to the mill for the first trip of the day. Both log trucks were being complacent and not calling any miles as they did not think that there was going to be anyone on the road.
At different locations the log trucks met crew cab pickups on their way to work. Both pickups narrowly missed the log trucks and avoided driving off of the road. When the pickup called to see why the log truck had not called kilometers, he replied “Oh well. You are the first that I have seen on the road this morning!”
When traveling on bush roads, expect the unexpected. Call all loaded kilometers regardless of day of the week or time of the day. Stay focused with your mind on the task, and don’t become complacent.

File attachments
2007-11-21 Neglecting to Call in Kilometres Results in Near Miss.pdf

Faller with allergy to bees stung in the woods

Location: 
Prince Rupert
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-01
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Faller was hiking into quarter and walked through a bees nest and was stung multiple times in the upper body. The faller knew that he was allergic but had not been stung in over 20 years in the bush. He did not have an eppy pen kit on him. Luckily he was a 3 minute hike to the heli pad and a 30 second flight to the hospital.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

All Crew allergies will be posted in the project book as well on all medi-vac on person procedures. No one who is allergic to bees is allowed on the hill without a eppy pen kit.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Jason (250)701-1911

File attachments
alerts-07-09-15-bee_stings.pdf

Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
East Ootsa Fraser Lake
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-03-16
Company Name: 
Ambroy Equipment Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Loader man was lifting the log bunk with the loader and a log was in the way; he got out to move the log and the truck driver thought he was ready for him to back up so he could put on the bunk back on. The loader man was between the loader and the log truck were he was crushed injuries were in the pelvic area and lost time incident. The forks on the loader prevented that could have been a fatality.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Reviewed working close procedures, and communication policy with both workers. Do not operate any equipment until you are told or you can see the person you are working with.

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