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Safety Alert

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-06-01
Company Name: 
Weyerhaeuser / BC Forestlands
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Two employees were using a steam pressure washer to clean off some mobile equipment in the yard at the end of the day. When finishing up they then used the pressure washer to clean off their work boots. After finishing cleaning off his own boots, the one employee proceeded to wash the other employees’ boots off as that employee held his leg out. A stream of hot steam/water shot up under the tongue of the worker’s boot resulting in a scald on the top of his foot.

The employee had to get medical aid treatment for the burn.


High pressure steam can cause severe burns to exposed skin, and high pressure air from an air hose onto exposed skin can cause an embolism which can be fatal.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

It is UNACCEPTABLE to use a steam cleaner or an air hose:
•on exposed skin, or
•to clean off any apparel while being worn

And always use appropriate PPE (eye protection and gloves) while using this equipment.
If in doubt about safe operation of this type of equipment ask your supervisor.

File attachments
2007-06-01 steam pressure washer leads to burn.pdf

Worker Injured While Lifting Water Tank

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-04
Company Name: 
Galena Contractors Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A worker was injured while attempting to attach a water tank, which was mounted on a trailer, to a vehicle so the water tank could be moved to a new location.

The worker was using a jackall to raise the trailer hitch of the water tank so he could attach the hitch to the trailer ball mounted on the back of a vehicle. The worker had jacked the hitch to the required height and had backed the vehicle into position so the hitch could be lowered onto the trailer ball.

The jackall slipped as the worker was lowering the trailer hitch, and the handle struck him on the right side of his head. The worker experienced pain in his head, eye, and jaw. The employee went for medical attention, and there was lost time due to the injury.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Jackalls can be very dangerous if used improperly or if used attempting to lift an object heavier than their
recommended capacity. A Safe Work Practice (SWP) regarding the use of jackalls should been developed by
employers, and the SWP should be circulated, reviewed, understood, and incorporated into practice.

2. It is extremely important to make sure at all times that the reversing catch of the jackall is in the upright position
whenever a load is held. Similarly, the operating handle should always be left in the upright position against the
rack when a load is on the toe.

3. The reversing catch of the jackall must never be released when the operating handle is in the lowered position
because with a heavy weight on the toe of the jack, that handle will almost certainly fly up against the rack. This
shock on the jackall will cause the handle to fly back down again as the pegs take their turn in lowering the load
rather rapidly, and that handle will continue in flying up and down until the load comes off the toe. If you have
lifted a load halfway up the jackall rack, that handle could easily fly in each direction a dozen times in a blur of
speed. The uncontrolled handle can cause serious injuries.

4. Maintain pressure on the jack handle while the load is being lowered – doing so will help ensure that the jack
handle does not spring up, and fly up and down as the load is released from the jackall.

File attachments
2007-10-04 Worker Injured While Lifting Water Tank.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
Geographic Area Identified as Kitchen Creek located near Kinbasket Lake in the Golden TSA
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-08-01
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Two workers were carrying a tank and went to place it in the back of a pick up. While lowering the tank one worker pinched a finger under the tank. The finger was also cut.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Ensure workers wear gloves and ensure that when items are placed down it is in such a manner that fingers will not become pinched. (i.e. carry tank by handles or place the object on a piece a wood to create a sufficient gap).

File attachments
2007-08-01 Pinched finger under tank.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
Howe Sound DLS
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-14
Company Name: 
S. McKillop Logging Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Two scalers were grading logs with a log tape between them. The edge of the steel tape caught one of the scaler’s right hand. He received one half inch cuts to both his middle and pinky fingers. He cleaned up the wounds himself and returned to work. Two days later his hand was swollen and he required antibiotic treatment.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Scalers must wear gloves while taping and grading logs.
Workers must seek immediate attention

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Scott McKillop (S. McKillop Logging Ltd.) 250-729-1100

File attachments
2007-10-14 Grading Results in Injury.pdf

Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
May Lake near Bamfield B.C.
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-16
Company Name: 
HFN Forestry L.P.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A four man shake and shingle crew were reloading a row of shingle blocks onto the
back of a flatbed truck after the row had fallen over due to moving unrestrained.
Two workers were on the deck of the truck and a third was handing up a block to
them when the nearly completed row fell over on them. The two workers on the
deck were pushed off by the falling blocks onto the third worker and the blocks
landed on top of them. One worker sustained a fractured bone in his foot, another
received a cut requiring five stitches and the third suffered bumps and bruises. The
accident investigation revealed that the shingle blocks were 20 inches long and the
two rows of blocks were placed on a 36-inch pallet making the front of the row
unstable.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Don’t take shortcuts. Take the time required to do things safely.
Never move a load without restraints.
Both rows should have been replied on a 40-inch pallet.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Mark Godard 250-204-7060 mark.godard@hfnforestry.com

File attachments
2007-10-16 Reloading Shingle Blocks Causes Injury.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
Geographic Area identified as Kitchen Creek located near Kinbasket Lake in the Golden TSA
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-07-17
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

An excavator had been utilized on a cable harvesting operation as a mobile back spar. The planned use of the mobile back spar was limited to operationally feasible terrain. Part of the block was deemed too steep for the excavator.

After the planned use of the mobile back spar was completed, the excavator was to be moved and parked on benched terrain. The cable yarding crew was to begin stump rigging. Post mobile back spar use, the excavator operator decided to walk off the benched terrain straight down the hill on a gradient of approximately 63% for 7 to 8 meters prior to stopping. At this location the operator decided to construct a level spot, on 60% terrain adjacent to the excavator, to park the machine.

The operator constructed the pedestal and attempted to walk the machine to it, but then realized a stump was in the way. At this point, part of the track was sitting on a rock. The operator then focused on carefully removing the stump to complete the move. The operator finally plucked the stump from the ground and the jarring motion caused the excavator to slide sideways on the rock. The excavator began to roll. The excavator rolled down a 60% gradient for approximately 17 meters through logging slash and then another 80 meters at 63% gradient through the timber before coming to a rest against a tree. The operator safely exited the machine with minimal injuries.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Operator must follow supervisors instructions regarding avoiding identified steep terrain. Operator must take the time to properly assess down slope hazards and develop a plan prior to operating on steep terrain. Operator must adhere to the Contractors’ Safety Program procedure and WCB legislation regarding operating on steep terrain (procedures and legislation set limits for the machine and operator). Operator must not operate on terrain that is beyond the operators training, comfort zone and established procedures. Operator must safely stop and request for assistance if at any time the machine becomes or is perceived to become unstable.

File attachments
2007-07-17 Excavator rolls down hill.pdf

Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
Miller Main Bridge Site 5+800, Miller Main FSR
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-20
Company Name: 
Surespan Construction Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Worker was on the carbody of the crane (American 5460 – 55t Friction / Conventional rubber-tried crane), walking from controls in operators cab to the engine behind in order to de-energize the crane, shutting down for the day. While walking on the catwalk (approx. 6ft to 8ft in length, 2ft wide) secured to the outside of the cab, the catwalk gave way. The worker and the catwalk fell approx. 7ft into a small ditch with a slightly sloped grade. Worker sustained injury to left heel. Incident was reported immediately to Surespan Management.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Worker should have visually/physically inspected the catwalk and its “fastening”
mechanisms secured to the carbody after installing it during rigging/mobilization of the
crane;
• Completion of investigation with assistance of worker involved, Equipment Manager and
Senior Management;
• Review and amendment to Surespan’s Safe Work Practice for Crane Rigging and Hoisting
– circulate to workers;
• Arrange for the repair of catwalk (belonging to American 5460 crane);
• Review incident/investigation at the next Occupational Health and Safety Committee
Meeting;
• Refresher training of Surespan’s Safe Work Practices and Safe Job Procedures scheduled
for early January, 2008.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Angela Bester, Manager of Health & Safety, Surespan Construction Ltd.
Email: angie@surespan.com

File attachments
2007-11-20 Catwalk Collapses Causing Injury.pdf

Safety Alert

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-21
Company Name: 
Blackwater Construction
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A mechanic and a young apprentice were dropping a belly pan from a dozer. They had only one floor jack and wood blocks to secure the pan from falling. The pan slipped off the jack/blocks and impacted the apprentice’s right hand. There were no serious injuries and the apprentice was back at work for the next shift.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Please ensure that proper tools are used for the job. A proper jack would in all likelihood have prevented this incident from occurring. Do a pre-work to ensure safety. And remember, young workers need enhanced instructions and supervision to accomplish a job safely

File attachments
2007-11-21 Always Use Proper Equipment.pdf

HAZARD ALERT

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-11-20
Company Name: 
LTN Contracting Ltd. / Roga Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On November 20, 2007 at approximately 7:00 PM a contract lowbed (Roga Contracting Ltd.) was transporting a TigerCat 870 feller-buncher into a block.

While making a low speed right-hand turn, the lowbed bound up with the tractor. The resulting pressure caused the neck and deck to come apart (the lowbed came apart), with the latch pin failing and the d-ring keepers being bent.

There were no injuries and minimal damage to the lowbed from the mechanical failure of the attachment components.

The age of the lowbed is 10+ years. Maintenance records indicate a recent inspection and timely repair and service records.

Root cause for the equipment failure is age of equipment and underlying metal fatigue that is not visible to naked eye.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Remind lowbed drivers that they are professional drivers and it is their legal responsibility to monitor and inspect their equipment daily and notify their supervisor of any problems or potential problems immediately.
2. For all lowbed trailers over ten years of age, all attachment components are to be inspected monthly for signs of wear or fatigue by company mechanic or certified mechanic.
3. For all lowbed trailers, repair or replace lowbed attachment components as required, or schedule the work to be completed by a certified facility.

File attachments
2007-11-20 Pressure Causes Lowbed to Come Apart.pdf

Close Call/Serious Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Other
Location: 
K&D Shop Ft St James
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-12-01
Company Name: 
KDL Group
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The first worker to enter the shop that day encountered a hissing sound originating from the oxy/acetylene bottles. He discovered the bottles had been left on overnight. This is in contravention of the Cutting Torch Operation Training Brief. He quickly shut off the gas flow at the bottles and opened the shop doors to air out the building. He was able to accomplish this without any further consequences.
Due to the severity of the hazard, he was unable to discover the source of the hissing. The oxy/acetylene bottles were locked out and the hoses and flashback valves were replaced. After discussion with a welding supply dealer, it was learned that flashback valves need to be replaced every 2-3 years.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1)Workers are to be reminded of the consequences when company safe work procedures are not followed.
2)Flashback valves should be added to the company preventative maintenance program and replaced every 2 years.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Martin Elphee
Health & Safety Coordinator
KDL Group
250-996-8032

File attachments
2007-12-01 Close Call Involving Cutting Torch.pdf
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