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Stud Failure leads to “Wheels Off” Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
Hudson Bay, SK
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-12-10
Company Name: 
Weyerhaeuser
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Small cracks were visible on the back face of the outer rim (aluminium) of a heavy commercial vehicle's wheel. Experts indicate that these cracks form between stud holes as a result of wheels being “run loose” at some point. When cracks form from stud hole to outer rim edge, it is the result of contact stress (weights too heavy, hit bad bump etc).

In this incident a single stud had broken approximately 2 months prior to the wheels off incident (due to the cracked rim). Only the damaged stud was replaced and the cracked rims went unnoticed and uncorrected. When the single stud broke, it compromised the remaining studs, that were not replaced. At this point it was only a matter of time before another failure occurred.

Two months later, a catastrophic failure of all 10 studs occurred within 50-100km resulting in a wheels off on a public highway.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • When you have problems with wheel end components: a broken stud, a loose nut etc, you must investigate and correct the cause, not just the part that is broken. In this case the cause of the stud failure was the cracked rim. Fixing the broken stud did not - and would not - have prevented this occurrence without also replacing the rim.
  • Manufacturer’s recommendations must always be followed when completing a repair.  Common manufacturers such as Accuride Wheel End Solutions recommend replacing at least one additional stud on each side of a broken one. If two or more break, all must be replaced. From this investigation experts have recommended (due to haul weights) that in the event of even a single stud failure, all should be replaced and all additional wheel end components checked for issues.
  • The location of these cracks would have been extremely difficult to detect unless the wheels were off for maintenance. It is critically important that when wheels are off to change tires or complete other maintenance their components are assessed for damage and replaced if necessary (the age of these cracks was estimated to be at least one year old).
  • Work together with those completing maintenance and repairs, whether they be shops, yourself, or a mechanic you employ. Training and education on how to properly maintain your equipment is paramount and could have prevented this “wheels off” incident. The governing body that inspects the shops which perform this maintenance commercially have followed up and are working with them to ensure that training is provided to their employees.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Trish Kohorst, BC Forest Safety Council Prince George offices 1-250-562-3215

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Cracked_Rims_wheels_off.docx

Log truck compensator failure results in spilled load, smashed pickup truck and injuries

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Akolkolex Forest Service Road (near Revelstoke BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-11-15
Company Name: 
Downie Timber Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A Woodlands employee was travelling (to 16km on the Crawford) to visit a timber sale. He was monitoring the radio and communicating his location with logging trucks on the road enroute.

The employee heard a loaded logging truck call their location at 5km and proceeded to clear the road by backing into a wide landing at the bottom of the 4km hill (at 3.5km). His truck was fully clear of the switchback and parked on the other side of the ditch. He watched the loaded truck coming down the hill and the woodlands employee and the driver were chatting as the truck entered the turn of the switchback.

Just as the loaded truck was entering the switch the driver looked in his side mirror and noticed the trailer bunk “locked up” sliding towards the left. The trailer did not slide more than 15-20 metres, neither the woodlands employee or the driver is sure what happened next; the trailer pulled apart and the bundled load was spilled from the rear axle of the truck (still fully contained by wrappers) and struck the woodlands employee’s cleared pick up across the hood and windshield (see photos in attached pdf).

The woodlands employee was shaken up and reported a sore neck (and later - by the time the supervisors arrived on the scene to investigate) a bit of a headache. The employee was taken to hospital and diagnosed with a mild concussion.

The weather at the time of the incident was rainy with temperatures above freezing. Road conditions were muddy and wet with some small icy areas but reported as better than conditions on the previous day.

A truck inspection was completed before the first trip of the day. It was discovered on scene that the trailer pulled apart at the compensator after successfully traveling 3 other switchbacks before this point. The bolt on the compensator was found in the compensator but not in place. A nut was missing from the bunk pin. It is unclear if it was dislodged as a result of the incident or preceding it. Chains next to the compensator (shorter of the 2 sets) were in place. The safety chains normally attached to the reach were not connected to prevent binding on the switch back. The driver indicated the chains normally would be connected before travelling the highway.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Though not a legal requirement on off-highway haul routes, safety chains on the truck trailer could have prevented this incident from occurring. While there is no specific regulation requiring the use of safety chains until traveling on highways, the expectation is that they be put in place as soon as the trucks reach a mainline (ok to leave them off on short block spurs that do not have other traffic). In situations where there is a corner that is too tight, and the chains will bind, the direction is that they must add links to extend the chain and use a bungee cord to hold up the slack.

For more information on this submitted alert: 
File attachments
Safety_Alert-Downie_Timber-Log_Truck_Compensator_Failure-Nov_15-2018.pdf

Resource Road Driving: Don't blind the oncoming driver when clearing loaded industrial vehicles

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
REsource roads throughout British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-11-09
Company Name: 
INTERFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

As part of the ‘rules of the road’, a loaded industrial vehicle (logging truck, lowbed, etc) always has the right of way.

When clearing vehicles, especially in low light or dark conditions, headlights pointed towards the oncoming vehicle can result in a hazard as it limits the vision for the driver of the oncoming vehicle.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • When using a pull out, position your vehicle so that the lights are not in the direction of oncoming traffic.
  • If you choose not to angle your vehicle away from the oncoming traffic, turn off your headlights/light bars and turn on the ‘cargo lamp’ at the back of your vehicle. This ensures that your vehicle still remains visible in the dark while avoiding ‘blinding’ the oncoming driver.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 
File attachments
Safety_Alert-Interfor_ResourceRoadDriving-ClearingLoadedIndustrialVehicles_Nov_9-2018.pdf

Forestry Engineer suffers fractured skull

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
West Jordan Main FSR (Shawnigan Lake area)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-10-31
Company Name: 
Iverson Forest Management Inc.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A Forestry Engineer was pulling ribbon on a hillside; the terrain was mostly mossy, open ground, between trees. The Engineer was traversing the hill and took a step downward, causing a dead stick 5mm in diameter to stand straight up, it was below the sight line and easily not seen.

The Engineer followed through with his step and the stick went right up his nose and broke off (see photos in attached pdf).

The stick penetrated through the cribriform plate causing a skull fracture and cerebral spinal fluid to leak out.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Always be aware of surroundings, even in easy terrain
  • Do not remove penetrating objects. Leave them in place and seek medical assistance.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Iverson Forest Management (250) 710-1463

File attachments
Hazard_Alert_Iverson_Forest_Mgmt_Inc-Fractured_Skull-Oct_31-2018.pdf

Man-made Hazards

Safety Alert Type: 
Worksites
Location: 
Vancouver Island / Coastal BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-09-27
Company Name: 
Strategic Natural Resource Consultants Inc.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Crews completing post-harvest assessments identified “man-made” hazards that had been created in the harvesting phases (see photos in attached pdf).

Crews identified these hazards early, and ensured teams avoided being in the bight. The hazards were also reported to the land owner.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Although these acts may seem to showcase skills in equipment operation, creation of these hazards can be devastating for post-harvest activities including surveying and / or planting.

Created hazards such as these can also be a serious problem months or years down the road, when stumps rot or harvesting occurs in future.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Aaron Frost, OHST, CSO Strategic Natural Resource Consultants Inc.

aaron.frost@snrc.ca

(250) 233-4632

File attachments
Safety_Alert-SNRC-Man_Made_Hazards-Sept_27-2018.pdf

Use caution in areas burned by wildfires

Safety Alert Type: 
Worksites
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-09-14
Company Name: 
BC Wildfire Service
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The 2018 wildfire season has been one of the most challenging in British Columbia’s history, and some areas of the province have sustained considerable damage.

Hunters, recreationalists and anyone else heading into the backcountry should use caution when travelling in areas affected by wildfires, since there may be safety hazards present. These hazards could include:

  • danger trees (fire-damaged trees that have become unstable and could fall over without warning)
  • ash pits, which may be hard to detect and can remain hot long after the flames have died down
  • unstable soils and terrain
  • increased potential for landslides or rock falls
  • damaged trails or irregular trail surfaces
  • increased water runoff, which could lead to flooding or debris flows
  • damaged fencing, which could allow livestock to enter roadways

In areas that have been severely burned, post-wildfire risks may last for two years or more. However, the increased risk of floods or debris flows in severely burned areas may persist much longer.

Every year, post-wildfire hazard assessments are completed on significant wildfires to identify potential threats to public safety, buildings or infrastructure. Risk mitigation and rehabilitation planning are already underway in some areas.

The BC Wildfire Service reminds members of the public that they also need to use extreme caution in regions where fires are still burning. Wildfires are active worksites where fire suppression efforts may be ongoing.

People can expect to see smouldering ground fires and smoke within the perimeters of existing wildfires over the coming weeks. This is common with large wildfires and may continue for some time. If smoke is rising from well within a fire’s perimeter and the area is surrounded by black, burned material, this is typically not a concern. However, smoke rising from green, unburned fuel or from outside a fire’s perimeter should be reported immediately.

To report a wildfire, unattended campfire or open burning violation, call *5555 on a cellphone or 1 800 663-5555 toll-free. For the latest information on current wildfire activity, burning restrictions, road closures and air quality advisories, visit: www.bcwildfire.ca

You can also follow the latest wildfire news:

Quick Facts:

  • Area restriction orders are still in effect for Crown land in the vicinity of some active wildfires, to help protect public safety and avoid interference with firefighting activities.
  • A list of areas affected by area restriction orders is available online at: www.gov.bc.ca/wildfirebans
  • Even if an area restriction order has been rescinded, officials engaged in fire control (including firefighters) have the authority under the Wildfire Act and its regulations to order anyone to leave the area.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

A “Landslide and Flooding Risks Due to Wildfires” brochure describes how wildfire activity may increase the risk of landslides and flooding, lists warning signs that people should watch for and advises what they should do in an emergency. The brochure is available online: http://ow.ly/WKGJ30lNvX4

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kevin Skrepnek, Chief Fire Information Officer - BC Wildfire Service Provincial Wildfire Coordination Centre (250) 312-3051

File attachments
Hazard_Alert_Use_caution_in_areas_burned_by_wildfires-BCWS-Sept 14-2018.pdf

Carrot pin bracket detaches from log truck, strikes vehicle on highway

Safety Alert Type: 
Paved Roads
Location: 
Kootenay Region
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-08-14
Company Name: 
INTERFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A logging truck driver heard the sound of a blown tire, and pulled over.

While inspecting the tire, the driver of a public vehicle approached the logging truck to explain that a piece of metal had flown off the logging truck, and broke through the hood of the vehicle on the driver’s side (see photos in attached document).

Upon further investigation, the logging truck driver discovered that a carrot pin bracket was missing off the forward bunk.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Remove the carrot pin from the bracket while the truck is loaded
  • Complete pre & post trip inspections on logging trucks, and correct identified issues
  • Schedule routine maintenance inspections to inspect all welds, including carrot pin welds.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kait Baskerville, Woodlands Safety Coordinator, Kootenay Operations: Kait.Baskerville@interfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert-Interfor-Carrot_Pin_Bracket_Maintenance-Aug_14-2018.pdf

Staying Hydrated: Vital for forest worker health, especially on the wildfire lines!

Safety Alert Type: 
Workers
Location: 
British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-08-10
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

When the topic of dehydration is raised, don’t think it only happens on the fireline. All forestry workers including those working in logging, silviculture and other field positions can be affected by dehydration.

To many, thirst is the first indication that they need something to drink. In reality, by the time you are thirsty it is too late and you could already be 2% dehydrated. At 4%, you are unable to do your job efficiently, at 7% you likely will be throwing up. At 10% you are near death.

Keep this in mind – the best way to determine if you are drinking enough is to:

  • Check your thirst – if you have dry mouth or are thirsty, you most likely have not been drinking enough fluids
  • Check your urine – if your urine has a strong smell and is a dark yellow colour, you may not be getting enough fluids. Your urine should be clear in colour or light yellow and you should frequently urinate throughout the day
  • Observe your state of mind – if you are tired, light-headed, have many headaches, or are unable to focus, you could be dehydrated.

The constant intake of fluids is essential. Fluids help to:

  • lower your risk of dehydration and heat stroke
  • control your body temperature
  • keep a normal blood pressure
  • protect and cushion your joints and organs
  • move nutrients and waste through the body

It is hard to quantify the amount of fluids an individual is required to drink on a daily basis. This is because there are many factors involved including the level and type of physical activity, age, gender and the environment the person is working in.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Tips to meet your fluid needs

  • Be aware of your thirst and drink fluids often throughout the day
  • Choose water when you are thirsty. Avoid soft drinks
  • Keep water nearby when you are at work, at school, exercising or out and about
  • Enjoy other fluids to help you meet your fluid intake such as milk, fortified soy beverages, vegetable or fruit juices and soups
  • Choose decaffeinated drinks more often to keep you well hydrated. Drinks with caffeine should be limited to 3 cups per day
  • Take sips of water while eating meals and snacks
  • Keep a container full of ice water with lemon, lime or other flavours, in your fridge at home or at work
  • When going to the field, ensure that crews and individuals have plenty of water
  • Remember to drink additional water in hot weather and when you are very active.

Everyone must be diligent in monitoring themselves and their co-workers for proper hydration habits.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Gerard Messier at messier@bcforestsafe.org

 

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Dehydration_in_forestry_workers-August-2018.pdf

Keep your mind on task (crew cab rolls over)

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-06-29
Company Name: 
BC Forest Safety Council (Transportation Safety)
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On an active resource road in the Prince George area, a crew cab truck carrying 5 passengers and the driver rolled after meeting a loaded logging truck.

Road calling procedures required that only loaded traffic call kilometres. The driver of the crew cab thought they were at a different kilometre on the road and therefore failed to find a pullout when hearing a loaded log truck call his kilometre.

The two vehicles met on a narrow stretch of road and passed without incident. However the shoulder was soft and steep which contributed to a slow roll-over of the crew cab. Fortunately, no one was injured in the incident.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Always be aware of your location (mind on task). Even experienced drivers can become distracted with thoughts, conversation and forget the importance of knowing their location.
  • As a precaution, use a 2km rule. When you hear a loaded vehicle coming within 2kms, find a pullout and wait. Roads can be narrower than normal making it difficult for vehicles to pass by each other. There may be fewer pullouts than you expect.
  • Ensure adequate planning to help contractors reduce travel on busy haul roads. • Always wear a seatbelt.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Call the BCFSC Transportation Department at (250) 562-3215

File attachments
Resource_Road_Alert-BCFSC_June_29-2018.pdf

Fire Danger Ratings High to Extreme in BC

Safety Alert Type: 
Weather
Location: 
Province-wide
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-07-31
Company Name: 
BC Wildfire Service
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Forestry companies are reminded to be vigilant with industrial and/or high-risk activities, as hot and dry weather has resulted in High to Extreme fire danger ratings throughout British Columbia. As the wildfire risk increases, the standard of care used by industry should change accordingly to reflect current conditions. Human-caused wildfires divert critical response resources away from naturally occurring wildfires.

Please pay particular attention to the Fire Danger Class rating in your area, ensure that you are using the appropriate weather station data for the area where you’re operating, and adhere to the shutdown formulas outlined in the province’s wildfire regulations.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

To view the Fire Danger Class Report, please visit www.bcwildfire.ca and click on the “View Fire Danger Ratings” button.

Remember that if you see or cause a wildfire, you have an obligation to report it, take action with available resources and extinguish the fire if it’s practicable to do so. Please ensure that you carry out your industrial operations in accordance with the Wildfire Act and the Wildfire Regulation.

Wildfire Act: http://www.bclaws.ca/EPLibraries/bclaws_new/document/ID/freeside/00_04031_01

Wildfire Regulation: http://www.bclaws.ca/EPLibraries/bclaws_new/document/ID/freeside/11_38_2005

A summary of good practices related to fire preparedness for the forest industry can be found at: https://www.bcfpb.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/SIR30-Summary-of-Good-Practices.pdf

To report a wildfire or open burning violation, call 1-800-663-5555 or *5555 on your cellphone.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Provincial Wildfire Coordination Centre Information Line (250) 312-3051

File attachments
Safety_Alert-Fire_Danger_Ratings-August_2018.pdf
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