Hazard Alert: Check log trucks for rocks and debris before travelling on public roads!

Location: 
Province wide
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2012-11-07
Company Name: 
TimberWest
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The November 7th incident on southern Vancouver Island, where a rock fell from a loaded logging truck and struck the driver of an oncoming vehicle, has resulted in heightened awareness about debris within loads.

Through monitoring incoming loads to their delivery locations, Vancouver Island-based company TimberWest has determined that debris (primarily rocks and log chunks) continue to arrive inside loads at these locations.

This is clearly a safety hazard in all regions of British Columbia, with trucks travelling on public roads and en route to log sort yards, where this debris creates hazards for ground personnel (see pictures in the attached pdf).

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Pre-planning: Identify areas within the worksite that may have potential for debris to be errantly loaded
  • Ensure logs are completely free of hazardous debris before being loaded onto trucks. Note: Focucs should be on loading, loading location - which includes location where logs are pre-decked (so loader isn't struggling with rocks) - and include planning to always minimize fly-rock from road construction that could end up in a tree and eventually a load of logs.
  • When loading in the dark, ensure lights on the loaer are in good working order
  • Drivers should check loads to the best of their ability during loading and  prior to leaving the worksite, and again before entering onto public roads
  • Review this topic with your entire crew and canvass other ideas to eliminate debris within loads

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

For more information contact: TimberWest Forest Company, South Island Operations (250) 729-3731

File attachments
Hazard Alert: Check log trucks for rocks and debris before travelling on public roads!.pdf
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